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Côte d’Ivoire: Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund
Published Date:
July 2012
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Executive Summary

1. The implementation of the Poverty Reduction Strategy took place in a post-crisis environment. The following sections provide a summary of the PRSP implementation report for the period 2009-2011.

Chapter I: Context of Implementation and Financing of the PRS

Socio-political context

2. The Côte d’Ivoire Government’s PRSP, prepared with the participation of all sectors of the population, was adopted by the Council of Ministers on March 26, 2009 and approved by the executive boards of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, respectively, on March 27 and 30, 2009. On that date, the country attained the decision point under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative.

3. The implementation of the strategy over 2009-2011 took place in a socio-political environment dominated by the national pacification process following the military-political crisis of 2002. The process was interrupted by the post-election crisis in 2010, which resulted in deterioration of the security situation, an alarming social divide, extensive loss of human life, massive displacement of populations, a slowdown of economic activities, and the destruction of numerous social infrastructures and a substantial portion of potential production.

4. Since the end of the crisis in April 2011, Côte d’Ivoire has gradually recovered economic activity and social cohesion, as reflected in the reopening of banks, schools and health centers, markets, and industrial enterprises; the redeployment of the administration throughout the territory; and an improvement in the security environment. This situation paved the way for legislative elections in December 2011, which were judged free and transparent by the international community, in a context of political calm.

Economic environment

5. The principal economic commitment over 2009-2013 concerns support for growth through economic recovery, with a growth rate on the order of 5.8 percent on average, and specifically 3.9 percent for 2009 compared to 2.9 percent in 2008.

6. The country is further committed to take measures to comply with all WAEMU convergence criteria and successfully implement all the reforms provided in the economic and financial program agreed with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the technical and financial partners.

Specific measures implemented

7. In 2009, the Ivorian economy took advantage of the relative improvement in the sociopolitical, economic and financial environment. This situation enabled the Government to: (i) conclude an economic and financial program supported by the Extended Credit Facility (ECF, formerly the PRGF) in March 2009, and at the same time achieve the decision point under the HIPC initiative; (ii) receive external financial support serving to clear a substantial portion of domestic payment arrears; and (iii) obtain restructuring of its debt vis-à-vis Paris Club creditors.

8. The reforms undertaken over the period 2009-2011 include preliminary structural and sector measures. All the preliminary measures were executed, which concerned (i) eliminating arrears to multilateral institutions; (ii) producing the monthly treasury position; (iii) publishing the Government’s negotiation strategy for the restructuring of its external debt; (iv) reducing the export duty (DUS) from CFAF 220 to CFAF 210 per kilogram and the registration duty from 10 to 5 percent of the CIF price; and (v) providing interim audit reports of PFO debt and contracts executed pursuant to the five conventions for major public investment works.

9. Structural measures were geared primarily toward improving tax collection and rationalizing expenditure. In regard to mobilizing resources, the measures implemented concerned (i) suspending exemptions on imported rice; (ii) eliminating advance payments of tax revenue; (iii) completing the inventory of service receipts; (iv) implementing the transit information module of the customs merchandise clearance system (SIDAM) between the Port of Andizhan and certain border posts (Noé and Takikro).

10. The implementation of structural reforms defined in connection with the ECF-supported economic and financial program was severely disrupted by the socio-political situation. However, certain measures were executed, including (i) the effective implementation of a VAT at a cumulative rate of 22 percent of the CIF price on cocoa, beginning with the 2010-2011 crop year; (ii) effective implementation of the National Public Contracts Regulatory Authority (ANRMP); and (iii) continued implementation of the PRSP through the execution of pro-poor spending and preparation of a medium-term expenditure framework for the social sectors (health and education-training).

11. Fiscal consolidation continued in 2009 with (i) the start of accelerated refunds of VAT credits to private operators; (ii) the cessation of Government financial interventions in public banks; and (iii) the Chamber of Accounts’ adoption of the fiscal year 2008 budget review law prior to presentation of the 2010 budget.

12. Efforts to clear domestic arrears continued in 2010. The Government also focused on the management of external debt, in particular, with the restructuring of the securities held by private London Club creditors. However, due to the post-election crisis in November 2010, the execution of government financial operations was not fully in accordance with the benchmarks and performance criteria of the program concluded with the Bretton Woods institutions.

13. The budget reforms reinforced the structural benchmarks for public finance to improve the collection of domestic revenue, reduce losses in the use of resources, and improve traceability and reporting with respect to the use of public resources.

14. In regard to the public expenditure cycle, the efforts consisted of decentralizing the SIGFIP system and improving the interface with the ASTER government accounting monitoring application.

15. In addition, quick impact efforts to control government spending and improve the administration’s performance were undertaken in 2009, including the census of civil servants and preparation of a public administration reform plan for the CGRAE.

16. In the financial sector, the Government established a monitoring committee responsible for preparing and implementing the strategy based on the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) action plan. It also adopted a law against terrorism financing and an order on banking regulation as part of the institutional reform of West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the BCEAO.

17. The beginning of 2011 was marked by the post-election crisis, which seriously disrupted economic activities. In response to the situation, the new Government that took office in June 2011 adopted appropriate measures to mitigate the impact of the crisis on the economy and create conditions favorable to the recovery of economic activity. The measures concerned, inter alia, the implementation of the Presidential Emergency Program (PPU), the resumption of relations with all the development partners, improvement of business climate, strengthening of good governance, and the continuation of efforts to achieve the HIPC completion point. In this context, in June 2011 the government concluded an interim program supported by the Rapid Credit Facility (RCF). The program aims to implement the Government’s priority actions and stabilize the macroeconomic framework. Satisfactory implementation of the program that focused on the Government’s priority actions and stabilization of the macroeconomic framework led to the adoption of the new ECF-supported program concluded in September 2011, covering the period 2011-2014.

Evolution of selected macroeconomic aggregates over the period 2009-2011

18. In 2009, growth of the global economy was negative (-0.5 percent) following the 2008 financial crisis. In Côte d’Ivoire, the economy withstood the effects of the 2008 international financial crisis relatively well. The rate of GDP growth stood at 3.8 percent in 2009 compared to 2.3 percent in 2008, exceeding demographic growth (2.9 percent) for the first time since 1999.

19. At the start of 2010, the economy benefited from the gradual normalization of the sociopolitical situation. However, it was disrupted by endogenous shocks, primarily the electricity cutoffs observed over the first half of the year, the drastic decline in the production of crude oil, and the post-election crisis that erupted in November 2010. GDP growth stood at 2.4 percent compared to 3.8 percent in 2009, although it had been projected initially at 3 percent. In 2011, despite the Government’s efforts to normalize the socioeconomic and political situation, the country’s GDP contracted relative to 2010, to approximately -5 percent, reflecting the magnitude of impact of the post-election crisis.

20. The overall implementation of the structural reforms defined in the economic and financial program produced encouraging results, particularly in the area of public financial management based on the Public Expenditure Management and Financial Accountability Review (PEMFAR). The execution of government financial operations was marked by the support of the development partners.

Outlook

21. The Government’s economic outlook provides, inter alia, for: (i) improved macroeconomic forecasting through strengthened human resource capacities and the utilization of appropriate tools; (ii) increased tax and nontax resources through expansion of the tax base, improved collection of taxes and customs duties, the crackdown on tax fraud, and the contribution of service revenues to the Government’s budget; (iii) the continued control of current spending and operating expenditures to give priority to capital expenditure; (iv) improved management of public and quasi-public enterprises; (v) improved budget management through strengthening of the government budget preparation mechanism; (vi) improved fiscal management, with particular emphasis on interconnecting the different information systems and increasing transparency in public spending and the public debt management mechanism; (vii) improved monitoring of banks and financial institutions’ financing of the economy; (viii) improvement of the microfinance sector management and development framework; (ix) adoption of a consensual framework for assured intervention and disbursement by the technical and financial partners; (x) increased promotion of the Ivorian economy through international actions; and (xi) strengthened international economic and financial cooperation.

22. Through these interventions, the Government intends to achieve strong growth in the medium term to more effectively fight against poverty, create jobs (particularly for youths), and ensure budgetary and external sustainability.

Financing of the PRS

23. The financing of the poverty reduction strategy (PRS) is provided largely through budget resources and assistance from the Government’s technical and financial partners (TFP). In addition to the Government’s own revenue, budget resources are provided partly through assistance from the TFP in the form of budgetary support and partly by raising funds on the subregional financial market. The assistance from the TFP may also take the form of project grants or program grants.

Government efforts

24. The Government’s efforts led to funding of a number of actions provided in the PRSP priority action plan (PAP) from the government capital budget. PAPs have been used since 2010 for programming public investments and during budget conferences.

25. The Government’s budget resources consist largely of tax revenue and nontax revenue, in addition to grants.

26. Over the period 2009-2011, expenditures categorized as pro-poor increased to approximately CFAF 843 billion in 2009 (or 7.7 percent of GDP), CFAF 885.2 billion (or 7.8 percent of GDP) in 2010, and roughly CFAF 840.1 billion in 2011 (end-September 2011). In total, over CFAF 2,568.3 billion was spent on pro-poor efforts over the period. The proportion of these expenditures in total government expenditure is estimated at 32 percent in 2009, 30 percent in 2010, and 27 percent in 2011. These expenditures cover capital expenditures as well as ordinary expenditures executed by the ministries and other technical structures whose areas of intervention cover the sectors classified as pro-poor.

27. Based on budget data broken down by the sectors identified in the PRSP, total expenditures over the same period relating to implementation of the PRS came to over CFAF 3,423 billion, of which roughly CFAF 2,756.9 billion in ordinary expenditures and over 666.5 billion allocated specifically to capital expenditure.

28. Ordinary expenditures include both operating expenditures and wages and salaries. Capital expenditures relate to all programs and projects executed by the Government and its agencies over the period 2009-2011.

29. The analyses provided in the following paragraphs essentially concern the social sectors and certain key sectors for poverty reduction as presented in the PRSP.

30. Over all the sectors identified, education (preschool, primary, and secondary education) received the largest amount of budget resources over the period 2009-2011. In total, the sector received over CFAF 1138 billion, representing roughly 33.2 percent of all PRS-related spending.

31. Over 2009-2011, the health sector received a total of CFAF 338.4 billion. In addition to this, CFAF 19.1 billion was allocated to efforts to fight poverty. The entire health sector and the fight against HIV/AIDS received CFAF 357.5 billion, or roughly 10.4 percent of total PRS-related expenditures.

32. With over CFAF 40.4 billion in 2009, budget appropriations for the agriculture sector decreased from 38.2 billion in 2010 to 34.2 billion in 2011. Over the period 2009-2011, the sector received over CFAF 112.8 billion, or roughly 3.3 percent of effective PRS-related expenditure.

33. The infrastructure and transportation services development sector received roughly CFAF 693.6 billion in effective financing over 2009-2011, or about 20.3 percent of total resources allocated to the PRS. Spending in this sector increased over the period, from CFAF 194.7 billion in 2009 to over CFAF 248 billion in 2010, and CFAF 250.9 billion in 2011.

34. Spending for the energy sector totaled CFAF 225.2 billion, or close to 6.6 percent of the resources allocated to PRS implementation over 2009-2011. The efforts in the energy sector focused largely on the electrification of rural areas and increasing energy production capacities in order to cover national demand.

Contribution of the Technical and Financial Partners

35. The implementation of the PRS also benefited from support from the Government’s TFP. A portion of this support was provided in the form of budget support and is included in the budget expenditures detailed above. Other contributions from the TFP were made in the form of project support, based on framework documents adopted by the country in the different sectors and areas of the partners’ interventions.

36. The United Nations agencies (UN), through the UNDAF, aligned their interventions on the strategic pillars defined in the PRSP. The total 2009-2013 UNDAF budget is estimated at US$426,491,000.

37. Expenditures made in 2009 total US$95.9 8 million (or approximately CFAF 48 billion). These expenditures primarily financed basic social services (education, health, water and sanitation, protection, HIV/AIDS, 59.3 percent), the governance and decentralization pillar (24.8 percent), and the economic recovery and food security pillar (24.9 percent).

38. Expenditures in 2010 totaled US$57.14 million (approximately CFAF 28.6 billion), of which 47.1 percent for basic social services, 26 percent for the governance pillar, and 25.1 percent for the UNDAF economic pillar. The environment pillar (1.7 percent) received the lowest amount of financing of the UN system sectors.

39. In total, the UN spent over CFAF 76.6 billion in 2009 and 2010 on poverty reduction efforts.

Chapter II: Results of Implementation of the Poverty Reduction Strategy

Restoring and strengthening the foundations of the Republic

40. In the context of consolidating peace and social cohesion, the Government organized training workshops and seminars on preventing and managing conflicts for civil society and community leaders. The populations were involved in promoting national reconciliation through monitoring and outreach committees and through the efforts of inter-ethnic partnerships and relatives to restore conviviality. To facilitate the return to peace after the post-election crisis, the Government created and organized the CDVR. These efforts by the Government led, inter alia, to the return of military and civilian exiles and the organization of the December 2011 legislative elections in a climate of political calm.

41. In regard to restoring the Government’s authority throughout the national territory, the Government rehabilitated and re-equipped socioeconomic infrastructures in the Center, North and West (CNO) areas. The acquisition of command vehicles for the sub-prefectures facilitated the redeployment of all prefectural forces throughout the national territory and the gradual return of government officials and staff. In addition, to secure production processes and the issuance of administrative documents, the Government, with support from the TFP, implemented the Civilian Government Modernization Program (MECCI) beginning in 2009.

42. In the effort to improve the security of persons and property throughout the national territory, the Government demobilized 18,222 former Armed Forces of the New Forces (FAFN) combatants and disarmed 17,889 former militia. In addition, the former FAFN and Armed Forces of Côte d’Ivoire (FANCI) were merged in a single army, the Republican Forces of Côte D’Ivoire. In addition, a national commission to control the circulation of light arms and small caliber weapons (COMNAT-ALPC) was created. Also, to restore trust between populations and the police and security forces, the crackdown on racketeering was intensified through outreach campaigns, a reduction in the number of barracks to 33, and the creation of an anti-racketeering unit (ULR) and a military police force. Also, the rehabilitation and re-equipping of infrastructures strengthened operational capacities and improved mobility for security forces redeployed throughout the national territory.

43. In regard to judicial coverage, the Government upgraded and reopened a number of courts and redeployed magistrates and judicial assistants.

44. In the reform and modernization of the public administration, the efforts concerned the preparation of a code of ethics and professional conduct for public officials and the census of government employees to support control and forward management of staff. The “tiroir” operation instituted by the Government facilitated the processing of pending dossiers, including 11,556 dossiers relating to 26 actions of different kinds. Also in the context of reforms, the general organization of regional administration was reorganized into districts, regions, and departments, subprefectures, and villages and two types of decentralized administrative entities (regions and communes).

45. In the area of economic governance, the Government created the ANRMP in 2009. The Government also continued the decentralization of the SIGFIP, ASTER, and the public contracts information management system (SIGMAP). Efforts were also directed to strengthening management capacities in the petroleum sector, establishing a regulatory framework for the coffee/cocoa segment and conducting an audit of that segment. Also, the Government initiated a study based on the PEFA methodology to assess the fiscal management system.

46. In the effort to involve populations in managing local administrative entities, 15 local development plans were prepared by the districts and departments, with the effective participation of populations in various stages of the planning process. Also, the Government’s efforts helped provide the local administrations with infrastructure and professional equipment. In addition, qualified personnel were trained and assigned to local government services. In addition, local elected officials took part in regional and international meetings and exchanges of experience in the context of decentralized cooperation. With respect to reducing regional disparities, the Government implemented communes throughout the national territory and implemented the regional development scheme for the San Pedro district (the former Bas-Sassandra region).

Transforming Côte d’Ivoire into an emerging country

47. To professionalize the agriculture sector, professional agricultural, livestock and producer organizations received training to acquire the techniques needed for rational management of their operations. The training enabled producers of cotton, rice, cocoa, rubber, palm oil, and other food crops (cassava, maize, banana, plantain) and livestock producers (poultry, pork, grass-cutter, sheep and cattle) to intensify production systems through grants/subsidies from the Government for high-quality agricultural and veterinary inputs, effective animal and plant reproductive materials, and agricultural and livestock machinery.

48. In particular, the coffee-cocoa segment benefited from the “Quantity, Quality, Growth” program for cocoa at a cost of CFAF 6.9 9 billion. In regard to cotton, a CFAF 30.7 billion subsidy launched the segment’s recovery. A CFAF 5.2 billion SIFCA-PROPARCO credit agreement signed in 2011 served to rehabilitate and modernize the Zuénoula and Borotou sugar complexes. Fifteen fishing sector enterprises received tax exemptions totaling CFAF 2,783,424,322.

49. The installation of five processing units launched the processing of cashew nuts. Critical investments were made in infrastructures such as water reservoirs, rural roads, and storage and collection facilities essential to increasing agricultural yields and marketing products. In regard to securing agricultural operations, 79 land certificates were issued and 168 parcels delimited. Actions to build stakeholder technical capacities included the rehabilitation of certain agricultural technical infrastructures and animal and fishery resources. In regard to animal health, vaccination campaigns facilitated the inoculation of 1,162,471 cattle and 1,056,269 small stock against contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and small ruminants plague. In the area of consumer protection, health inspection and control agencies conducted inspections of animal-origin food products.

50. To improve the movement of persons and goods, development, rehabilitation and equipment work were conducted in the transportation infrastructure and services sector.

51. In regard to roads, 45,000 square meters of paved surfaces over 134 kilometers of roads and passages serving Abidjan and San Pedro, and 100 kilometers of surfaces on the Singrobo-Yamoussoukro corridor were repaired. The service level was improved for 43 itineraries over 4,000 linear kilometers of paved interurban roads and 577 kilometers of dirt roads. Critical points were treated over 3,100 kilometers of dirt roads, and 1,741 kilometers of paved national roads were regularly maintained through brush control and cleaning of drainage facilities. With respect to construction, some 20 civil engineering works and 76 culverts were completed, with the installation of 6,000 concrete culverts and 4,700 metal culverts over the highway network.

52. These actions served to connect a number of areas to the highway network that were disadvantaged, isolated, and economically unfeasible for private investors.

53. Other major efforts in the sector were the construction of docks and piers for maritime and port operations, the creation of a steering committee for the opening of the Academy of Civil Aviation and Meteorological Trades, and the opening of permit operations centers at Yamoussoukro and Daloa. The one-stop window at Korhogo was set up and equipped, and is now operational. Maintenance work also resumed to rehabilitate railroads and real estate and land assets in Abidjan. In the same vein, the regional aeronautical medicine center, the service building for the Garde Côtière Ivoirienne in Marcory, and the Highway Safety Office (OSER) bus station and training center in Grand-Bassam were rehabilitated. In addition, the Regional Academy of Motion Science and Techniques (ARSTM) and health center received medical goods and supplies. Satellite surveillance equipment was also provided by the International Maritime Organization, and inflatable boats, radar equipment, vehicles and IT equipment were procured.

54. In the mining segment, in addition to the mines already in operation in Ity, Angovia, and Bonikro, the Government’s efforts led to the start of extraction operations at the country’s largest gold mine, discovered at Tongon in 2009. Also, manganese extraction in the Bondoukou region continued, with production falling from 83,567.23 tons in 2009 to 40,401 tons in 2011. In addition, to better assess the mining potential of Ivorian subsoils, geological maps of the Daloa, Gagnoa, Sassandra, Soubré and Tabou departments were completed in 2009.

55. Efforts by the Government and its partners in the energy segment facilitated completion of the third phase of the CIPREL thermal plant (110 MW), which came on stream during the first half of 2010. Also, to mitigate the energy crisis of February through May 2010 caused by a service outage at the Azito plant combined with a shutdown of the 110 MW CIPREL turbine for maintenance work, the Ivorian Government imported energy from Ghana and leased generators of 70 MW guaranteed power for two years. In addition, 141 new areas were electrified using conventional systems, and two villages received solar photovoltaic powered public lighting systems as part of a pilot project. Also, 87.1 kilometers of medium-voltage lines, 200.4 kilometers of low-voltage lines, and 4614 street lamps were completed. Also, 32 condenser batteries were installed at 16 sites in connection with energy savings efforts at public buildings. Data was also collected, processed, and analyzed in an audit of lighting and climate control systems in public buildings conducted in 2010.

56. These accomplishments improved the principal indicators for the sector. The electricity penetration rate was 33 percent in 2010 compared to 31 percent in 2008. The percentage of the population living in electrified areas represented 74 percent of the total population in 2010 compared to 71 percent in 2008. The proportion of households with access to electricity also improved, from 20 percent in 2008 to 25 percent in 2010.

57. In the petroleum segment, the Government’s efforts improved transportation and storage infrastructures for petroleum products. GESTOCI undertook construction of two spherical storage tanks of 2,000 tons each in Abidjan to store butane gas. A 4,000 ton spherical tank with filler capacity of 300 tons per day is also under construction by PETROCI. A fourth 1500-ton tank is being built by the SAEPP. Construction of the Abidjan-Yamoussoukro-Bouaké pipeline and conversion of a 12 inch kerosene line to a butane line with SIAP docking is also in progress. All these facilities and works will be delivered in 2012.

58. Most of the activities to create jobs were implemented by the Government and its development partners through various post-conflict placement programs for ex-combatants, self-defense group, and other at-risk youths. Official statistics indicate that approximately 38,241 persons were reintegrated into the Ivorian economy.

59. In regard to the hiring of young graduates, the Government devoted significant budget resources to place roughly 8,435 persons in the education (4,535) and health (3,900) sectors, thereby improving the social development indicators relating to the MDGs.

60. The private sector benefited from a number of actions. In regard to institutional strengthening, a proposed law defining SMEs was validated by all stakeholders in 2011 and forwarded to the Government for adoption; a national good governance and anticorruption plan was prepared in 2009, and the revision of the 1995 investment code begun in 2010 was validated by the stakeholders.

61. In the context of improving the business climate and firms’ competitiveness, the Government substantially reduced the number of roadblocks in 2011, resulting in a 49 percent reduction in travel time for users at each roadblock.

62. A number of measures were also undertaken to reinvigorate the private sector, including (i) strengthening the capacities of numerous sector structures, including the accredited management centers (CGA); (ii) the adoption of measures in budget annexes to support enterprises; (iii) settlement of the debts of 41 SMEs in the context of the SME revitalization support program (PARP); and (iv) the organization of a national SME conference to consolidate government-private sector cooperation.

63. In addition, Côte d’Ivoire was declared eligible for the United States African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) program in 2011. At end-December 2011, CFAF 2577.1 billion in domestic debt (of a total of CFAF 3570.8 billion at the time) was cleared, reducing the Government’s arrears to the private sector to CFAF 296.8 billion.

64. To effectively combat cyber crime, protect individuals’ property and reassure investors, the Government created a cyber crime squad (CERT) in 2009. In 2010, the Government updated the new telecommunications/information and communications technologies (ICT) code, and in December 2011 it adopted a decree concerning identification of mobile phone subscribers and Internet users.

65. To reduce telecommunications costs and facilitate broader access to ICT services, the Government continued the full liberalization of the sector begun in 2004 and granted seven operator licenses for mobile telephone service. To fulfill the objectives of universal service and access, the Government began preparation of a national electronic governance strategy, which was finalized in 2011.

66. Among the actions undertaken to develop telecommunications infrastructure and media, the Government initiated a plan in 2009 to restructure the Ivoirien Postal Service, gradually reopen six post offices in former CNO areas, and rehabilitate and re-equip the former ISAPT. The Government also launched activities and the Pan-African Online Services Project, consisting of the introduction of telemedicine, e-education and diplomatic communications.

Improving welfare for all

67. Promotion of the education system was consolidated by reaffirming the policy of free education, reinstating school uniforms, cleaning up the school environment, strengthening capacities of sector stakeholders, recruiting 4,067 teachers, and distributing school kits and French, mathematics, and civic and moral education textbooks to over 90 percent of students.

68. The goal of increased access to education was furthered by the construction of 4,574 classrooms, the rehabilitation of 1,570 primary and secondary classrooms, and the rehabilitation and equipping of a number of new classrooms in Abidjan and other cities.

69. The distribution of textbooks resulted in coverage of 93.8 percent of students for French, 92.3 percent of students for math, and 90.1 percent of students for civic and moral education. In addition, 5,762,334 school kits were distributed. Also, to ensure that primary school students remain in school, 5,046 functional school canteens were opened.

70. All of these actions served to improve access to education. The gross admissions rate for the first year of primary school (CP1) increased from 73.4 percent in 2009 to 75.3 percent in 2011. The gross primary school enrollment rate, which was 76.2 percent in 2009, increased to 82.7 percent in 2011; the rate for secondary school increased from 35.9 percent to 36.7 percent.

71. Scientific research, in turn, served to provide improved plant and animal materials for rice, cassava, rubber, and fish producers.

72. In the area of higher education, the measures primarily concerned strengthening the legal and institutional framework, consolidating the private higher education sector, and rehabilitating, expansion, and equipping public universities and residence halls. Unfortunately, a substantial portion of the results were annihilated by the 2010 postelection crisis.

73. In regard to technical and professional training, the measures carried out related to the adoption of legal and regulatory texts, construction of several buildings, cleared arrears for scholarships and allowances, and the award of scholarships and stipends. The combined effect was to improve the quality of education and the sector’s financial position.

74. To improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the health system, the Government strengthened the institutional framework for the health system by recruiting 1,653 staff, rehabilitating and re-equipping hospital structures, supplying healthcare vehicles, conducting vaccination campaigns, providing coverage for surgery, and distributing healthcare materials. In 2001 the Government instituted free healthcare in public and community health establishments. The combination of these efforts increased the rate of births attended by qualified personnel from 67.5 percent in 2010 to 69.2 percent in 2011, and the early screening rate for Buruli ulcers to 67.65 percent.

75. In regard to the prevention of HIV/AIDS, the efforts concerned studies, rehabilitation and re-equipping of health structures, training of practitioners, outreach for populations at risk, distribution of resources, and care for infected persons and orphans. Collectively, these actions increased the percentage of HIV-infected pregnant women receiving anti-retroviral (ARV) treatment, the number of vulnerable orphans and children receiving care, and the number of treatment centers.

76. In the area of nutrition, the Government’s efforts helped provide food for orphans and vulnerable children, persons living with HIV, persons suffering from malnutrition, and pregnant women and nursing children receiving ARV treatment. These actions served to reduce maternal and infant-child mortality by improving the nutritional status of women and children.

77. In the context of promoting gender equality, outreach and awareness activities were conducted regarding the National Equal Opportunity, Equity, and Gender Policy adopted in 2009. The percentage of women in government declined from 21 percent in 2010 to 14 percent in 2011, below the target of 30 percent. For the 2011 legislative elections, 105 women ran for office, or approximately 11 percent, compared to 3 percent for the 2001 legislative elections. In secondary education, the girl/boy parity index increased from 0.81 in 2009 to 0.83 in 2011, still below the target of 0.90.

78. Concerning drinking water, the Government professionalized the management and operation of rural water works (village water (HV) and improved village water (HVA) systems) to protect and extend the life of installations and ensure continuity of public drinking water service in rural and semi-urban areas; and created the National Village Water Point Management Unit (CNGPEV) to assist rural communities in managing hydrological works with increased empowerment of women. The actions reduced the rate of outages from 54 percent to about 39 percent at end-2011. To provide disadvantaged populations with an effective solution to drinking water supply problems in their communities, the Government completed standpipes and service lines and provided connections for health centers to the drinking water distribution networks. The Government’s actions also supplied the populations’ drinking water needs in urban, semi-urban, and rural areas through the construction and rehabilitation of HVA and small and medium hydraulics. Collectively, the measures increased coverage of drinking water from 61 percent in 2008 to approximately 65.9 percent in 2011 nationwide (with 79 percent in urban areas and 53.1 percent in rural areas) compared to the 74.2 percent expected to achieve the MDGs in 2015.

79. In regard to the environment, the actions addressed strengthening of the legal and regulatory framework and the reforesting of 14,209 hectares of land. In addition, 70 village committees were established and revenue-generating activities were financed for river communities of the Tai national park. In support of the “clean city” operation, gutters were cleaned and garbage removed in the Abidjan and Yamoussoukro districts and communities including Grand-Bassam, Toumodi, Tiassalé, N’Douci, N’Zianouan, Daoukro, Daloa, and Man. In addition, analyses were conducted of the Ebrié lagoon and water tables in Abobo, Duékoué, Yopougon, Toulepleu, and Blolequin, which had been combat zones during the post-election crisis, to warn populations of the risks of pollution.

80. With respect to sanitation, orders creating and organizing the ONAD and FNAD were issued. The Gourou canals were also concreted and rehabilitated, asbestos cement conduit was replaced with PVC as well as [] the network extension to Adjamé Latin to Abobo four stages and to the Treichville sports arena area [sic]. Also, efforts served to rehabilitate and build pumping and lifting stations and install gravity and sewage conduit. All of these actions brought the sewage network into conformity and reduced the discharge of wastewater into the Abidjan lagoon. In the context of improved, sustainable access to sanitation in urban areas outside Abidjan and rural areas, 35 out of 127 villages were FDAL certified by the ministry in charge of sanitation, with support from UNICEF, and 6,000 latrines were constructed in 237 villages.

81. In the area of housing and living conditions, the measures served to strengthen provisions relating to urban development and habitat through the preparation and validation of a housing promotion strategy paper and the establishment of land reserves made viable by the construction of low-income housing. Also, the Housing Support Fund and Urban Terrain Account were revised to increase the capacity to produce decent housing and promote access and ownership for low-income households.

82. In the context of social protection, the achievements concerned the consolidation of assistance and management of indigent populations, strengthening of basic social structures, reintegration of internally displaced persons, and humanitarian assistance to populations affected by the post-election crisis. Nationwide, these actions produced a significant reduction of 71.8 percent in the total number of persons internally displaced following the post-election crisis, which declined from 600,958 to 169,486 at end-November 2011. However, the need for statistical data and information to assist in decision-making and policy development in the social and solidarity sectors remains a major concern. Also, the lack of intervention mechanism limits the capacities of units responding to emergency situations.

83. In regard to civil protection, the achievements of the ORSEC plan served to limit damage from flooding, reduce the occurrence of disasters, provide assistance to the injured, and reduce the number of victims from 11 deaths in 2010 to 6 deaths in 2011.

84. Regarding sports and leisure, the activities concerned the renovation and equipping of the National Youth and Sports Institute (INJS) and renovation of the National Sports Office (ONS) stadiums in Daloa and Gagnoa. Also, proposed laws were prepared concerning (i) the organization of sports and physical activities, (ii) restructuring of the INJS, (iii) the Ivorian Office of School and University Sports (OISSU), and (iv) the ONS.

85. Concerning culture, the measures served to restore government property and museums and build museums and training centers. Also, in 2010, the Government financed the Abidjan International Short Film Festival (FICA) and assistance for Clap-Ivoire, a film festival for young film producers from the WAEMU states. Also, the process of registering the city of Grand Bassam as a UNESCO world heritage site, initiated in 2006, was reinstated in 2011.

86. For the tourism sector, the actions served to increase the tourist flow from 205,152 in 2008 to 231,000 and 2009. The growth rate, which had been 8.86 percent from 2004 to 2006, increased to 12.61 percent in 2008-2009. Nationwide, movements of persons increased considerably following the political peace effort. With respect to hotel occupancy, nearly all of Côte d’Ivoire’s accommodation capacity is concentrated in Abidjan and the surrounding areas. Accordingly, the Abidjan district, with approximately 5,500 approved rooms, accommodates over 70 percent of Côte d’Ivoire’s hotel capacity. That capacity, which was 12,000 rooms in 2002, is estimated at about 15,000 rooms in 2009. The average occupancy rate observed nationwide was 56 percent in 2009.

87. In the artisanal industries, a proposed artisanal industries code was prepared and forwarded to the Government for adoption. The Craft Promotion and Support Fund (FAPA) Management Committee was established and commenced operations in 2010. A government/SME-artisan advisory committee was instituted in 2011 and is operational. Also, the National Chamber of Trades signed a partnership agreement with the National Chamber of Trades of Sarre (France) to implement a training plan called the “Interregional Network for the Adaptation of Technical and Professional Education to the Needs of the Crafts” (RIFA).

88. In regard to domestic trade, measures were implemented crack down on counterfeit products and contraband and address poor quality products. Discussion sessions with operators in the basic staples segments (sugar, rice, dairy, meat) resulted in measures to consolidate the market and make it more competitive. Actions to control dominant positions led to the adoption of texts eliminating priority importer clauses for rice so as to prevent monopolies. In addition, the Bouaké wholesale market was rehabilitated to restore its role as liaison between northern producers and the southern markets.

89. In regard to population activities, the government’s efforts led to completion of the fourth General Population and Housing Census (RGPH), revision of the RGPH design, the start of activities by members of the organizational framework, and revision and update of all technical documents (project documents, revised budget, timetable, promotional documents). However, the RGPH suffers from weak mobilization of resources, currently estimated at over CFAF 11 billion. Also, the Côte d’Ivoire 2010-2040 RAPID Model, highlighting the social economic consequences of demographic growth, and outreach modules regarding the population issue and development were finalized.

Transforming Côte d’Ivoire into a dynamic actor on the regional and international scene

90. Regarding international cooperation and regional integration, sector governance was strengthened through the preparation and adoption of the policy document on “Ivorian Diplomacy, Missions, Assessment, 2025 Outlook and Charter,” and the preparation of proposed decrees ratifying 17 international conventions and accords regarding money laundering and terrorism financing. In February 2010, the PACIR program was launched with €16 million in support from the European Union. Also, Côte d’Ivoire reestablished relations with all bilateral and multilateral partners. The government paid CFAF 1.5 billion of a total of CFAF 7 billion arrears in contributions owed to international organizations and contribute[d] to revitalizing the Mano River Union and the Conseil d’Entente, and took part in preparing the ECOWAS Community Program.

Introduction

91. Côte d’Ivoire, which initiated the PRSP process in 2000, produced an interim PRSP in March 2002. However, the military-political crisis that erupted in September of the same year cut short the process of preparing the final PRSP and dashed hopes of obtaining debt relief in the context of the HIPC initiative.

92. Following the March 2007 signature of the OPA, which created a favorable context to restoring and consolidating lasting peace, the Government conducted the process of preparing the final PRSP from December 2007 to January 2009. The PRSP is the result of a participatory, consensual approach entailing consultations among development stakeholders and populations in the development centers, the utilization of studies, application of sector policies, and the assessment of the program in progress.

93. In finalizing the PRSP, the Government met the need for a coherent, consensual reference framework geared toward specific results that establishes the major strategies for development and poverty reduction over the period 2009-2013.

94. The Bretton Woods institutions’ approval of the final PRSP and the 2009-2011 economic and financial program on March 27 and 30, 2009, facilitated achievement of the HIPC decision point. The completion point is expected to be attained at the conclusion of satisfactory implementation of the PRSP over at least one year, confirmed by an annual status report submitted by the Government to the AID and the IMF.

95. However, full implementation of the PRS took place in a post-crisis environment marked by the electoral process; the demobilization, disarmament, and reintegration of ex-combatants; and the redeployment of government throughout the national territory. Moreover, the post-election crisis of December 2010 brought disruption of socioeconomic activities and deterioration of infrastructures in various regions of the country, thereby creating additional, urgent needs which the Government was compelled to address.

96. This report, prepared on the basis of information available at end-December 2011, serves a dual objective: (i) to assess the implementation of the PRS, and (ii) to identify the constraints and difficulties that hindered the implementation of actions over the period and describe the outlook for the coming years.

97. In methodological terms, the report was produced following a participatory approach that encouraged the involvement of all stakeholders. Accordingly, the process of preparing this PRSP implementation report involved several stages:

  • the collection of local data with the assistance of local PRSP monitoring committees located in the 10 development centers;
  • the collection of central government data from the different sector ministries;
  • synthesis of the data collected and preparation of an initial draft report;
  • submission of the draft report to all actors, particularly the sector ministries, civil society organizations and TFP to solicit their comments and contributions; and
  • production of the final version of the report incorporating the comments and contributions of the different stakeholders.

98. The report is structured as six chapters grouped in two major sections. The first section describes the socio-political context and economic environment during the implementation period. It also describes the Government and its partners’ efforts to mobilize resources, the resources allocated, and extent of execution. The second section details, by impact and sector, the commitments assumed by the Government, the specific measures implemented, and the results achieved in terms of performance and prospects for 2012. The final chapter of the section identifies the major constraints encountered in implementing the PRSP and provides recommendations for adjustments to be contemplated to continue implementation of development and poverty-reduction activities on a more satisfactory basis.

Part I: Context of Implementation and Financing of the PRS

Chapter 1: Socio-Political and Economic Environment

Socio-Political Context

99. The PRSP, prepared with the participation of all sectors of the population, was adopted by the Council of Ministers on March 26, 2009 and approved by the executive boards of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, respectively, on March 27 and 30, 2009. At that date, Côte d’Ivoire achieved the decision point under the HIPC Initiative.

100. Implementation of the PRSP over the period 2009-2011 took place in a socio-political environment shaped by the emergence from the 2002 crisis. In accordance with the OPA signed in 2007, the Government’s efforts focused on the post-crisis programs, consisting of: (i) demobilization and reinsertion of ex-combatants; (ii) restoration of the Government’s authority in the ex-CNO areas; (iii) procedures for the judicial issuance of birth certificates, in order to reconstitute lost or destroyed vital statistics records; and (iv) the preparation and organization of presidential elections.

101. The end of 2010 was severely disrupted by a challenge to the presidential elections results. That situation plunged Côte d’Ivoire into an unprecedented crisis lasting six months. It resulted in serious human rights violations, loss of human life, and massive displacement of populations. In economic terms, business activity slowed, social infrastructures and many of the regions’ production potential were destroyed, and the security environment deteriorated significantly.

102. Since the end of the crisis, marked by the inauguration of President Alassane Dramane Ouattara in May 2011, Côte d’Ivoire has experienced strong economic recovery and a return of social cohesion, reflected in the reopening of banks, schools, health centers, shops, and industrial enterprises; redeployment of the administration throughout the national territory; and an improved security environment. This situation facilitated the organization of free and transparent elections in December 2011 in a climate of political calm. However, certain opposition parties chose not to participate in those elections.

Economic Environment

Commitments assumed for the period

103. The commitments assumed for the period 2009-2013 concern supporting growth through economic recovery, with growth on the order of 5.8 percent on average and specifically 3.9 percent for 2009 compared to 2.9 percent in 2008.

104. The country was required to take measures to comply with all WAEMU convergence criteria and successfully implement all reforms provided in the economic and financial program concluded with the IMF and the TFP.

Specific measures implemented

105. During 2009, the national economic situation evolved in an international and foreign environment marked by a widespread decline in commodities prices other than cocoa and gold. However, the Ivorian economy took advantage of the relative improvement in the socio-political, economic, and financial environment. The socio-political context enabled the Government to: (i) conclude an economic and financial program supported by the ECF (formerly the PRGF) in March 2009, accompanied by achievement of the decision point under the HIPC Initiative; (ii) receive external financial support, resulting in the clearing of substantial domestic payment arrears; and (iii) obtain restructuring of its debt to Paris Club creditors.

106. The reforms undertaken include preliminary structural and sector measures. All of the preliminary measures were executed, which concerned (i) eliminating arrears vis-à-vis multilateral institutions, (ii) monthly production of the treasury position, (iii) publication of the Government’s negotiating strategy to restructure its external debt, (iv) reducing the export duty (DUS) from CFAF 220 to CFAF 210 per kilogram and the registration duty from 10 to 5 percent of the CIF price; and (v) provide interim audit reports of PFO debt and contracts executed pursuant to the five conventions for major public investment works.

107. Structural measures were geared primarily toward improving tax collection and rationalizing expenditure. In regard to mobilizing resources, the measures implemented concerned (i) suspending exemptions on imported rice; (ii) eliminating advance payments of tax revenue; (iii) completing the inventory of service receipts; (iv) implementing the transit information module of the customs merchandise clearance system (SIDAM) between the Port of Andizhan and certain border posts (Noé and Takikro).

108. The Government also adopted a plan to reform the CGRAE to reduce subsidies provided to the fund. Over CFAF 54.2 billion in unrequited transfers were provided to the CGRAE in 2009 to enable it to meet its commitments.

109. Fiscal consolidation continued with (i) the start of accelerated refunds of VAT credits to private operators; (ii) the cessation of government financial interventions in public banks; (iii) the Chamber of Accounts’ adoption of the fiscal year 2008 budget review law prior to presentation of the 2010 budget.

110. The budget reforms reinforced the structural benchmarks for public finance to improve the collection of domestic revenue, reduce losses in the use of resources, and improve traceability and reporting with respect to the use of public resources. In this regard, the financial results of firms in the coffee-cocoa segment were adopted in the Council of Ministers, and certified extracts of the PETROCI financial statements were published.

In regard to the public expenditure cycle, efforts to decentralize the SIGFIP system and improving the interface with the ASTER government accounting monitoring application continued.

111. In addition, quick impact efforts to control government spending and improve the administration’s performance were undertaken in 2009, including the census of civil servants and preparation of a public administration reform plan for the CGRAE. In addition, the retirement age was increased from 55 to 57 and reforms of the CGRAI and CNPS were adopted.

112. In 2010, implementation of the economic and financial program continued amid gradual normalization of the socio-political situation, attributable in part to the execution of the post-crisis program. However, program execution was suspended following the electoral events.

113. In regard to public finance, efforts to clear domestic arrears continued. Efforts also focused on managing external debt, in particular, with the restructuring of securities held by private London Club creditors. However, the execution of government financial operations was not fully in accordance with the benchmarks and performance criteria agreed with the Bretton Woods institutions due, notably, to the November 010 postelection crisis.

114. The implementation of structural reforms defined in connection with the ECF-supported economic and financial program was severely disrupted by the socio-political situation. However, certain measures were executed, including (i) the effective implementation of a VAT at a cumulative rate of 22 percent of the CIF price on cocoa, beginning with the 2010-2011 crop year; (ii) effective implementation of the ANRMP; and (iii) continued implementation of the PRSP through the execution of pro-poor spending and preparation of a medium-term expenditure framework (MTEF) for the social sectors (health and education-training).

115. In the financial sector, the Government established a monitoring committee responsible for preparing and implementing the strategy based on the FSAP action plan. It also adopted a law against terrorism financing and an order on banking regulation as part of the institutional reform of the WAEMU and the BCEAO.

116. The beginning of 2011 was marked by the post-election crisis, which seriously disrupted economic activities. The aggravation of the crisis led to the partial destruction of the productive apparatus, the pillaging of companies’ inventories, and widespread insecurity throughout the national territory.

117. In response to the situation, the new Government that took office in June 2011 adopted appropriate measures to mitigate the impact of the crisis on the economy and create conditions favorable to the recovery of economic activity.

118. The measures concerned, inter alia, the implementation of the Presidential Emergency Program (PPU), the resumption of relations with all national and international development partners, the consolidation of peace, restoration of security throughout the national territory, anti-racketeering measures, the rehabilitation of socio-economic infrastructures, improvement of the business climate, and strengthening of good governance with particular emphasis on promoting the rule of law, and the continuation of efforts to achieve the HIPC completion point.

119.In this context, in June 2011 the Government concluded an interim program supported by the RCF. The program aims to implement the Government’s priority actions and stabilize the macroeconomic framework. Satisfactory implementation of the program that focused on the Government’s priority actions and stabilization of the macroeconomic framework led to the adoption of the new ECF-supported program concluded in September 2011, covering the period 2011-2014. These actions were part of the Government’s continued efforts to achieve the HIPC completion point.

Evolution of key macroeconomic aggregates by sector

120. The assessment of the macroeconomic framework is based on an analysis of the dynamic and interrelation between the real sector, public finances, the external sector, and the monetary position.

121. In 2009, growth of the global economy was negative (-0.5 percent) following the 2008 financial crisis. The implementation of fiscal stimulus measures and rigorous monetary policies in the major industrialized countries, combined with regulatory initiatives in financial markets around the world, revived growth in 2010 (5.1 percent), with growth on the order of 4.4 percent expected for 2011.

122.In Côte d’Ivoire, the economy withstood the effects of the 2008 international financial crisis relatively well, due in part to the continued normalization of the socio-political situation, full restoration of relations with the development partners, particularly the Bretton Woods institutions, domestic debt reduction efforts, the favorable trend in mining extraction, and strong agricultural export production. The GDP growth rate was 3.8 percent in 2009 compared to 2.3 percent in 2008, exceeding demographic growth (2.9 percent) for the first time since 1999.

123. At the start of 2010, and the economy benefited from the gradual normalization of the socio-political situation. However, it was disrupted by endogenous shocks, primarily the electricity cutoffs observed over the first half of the year, the drastic decline in crude oil production, and the post-election crisis that erupted in November 2010. The shocks adversely impacted industrial production, services, government operations, and the economy in general. In December alone, the post-election crisis cost the country over 0.4 percentage points of GDP. The growth rate, initially projected at 3 percent, ultimately stood at 2.4 percent. The effect of the shocks, then, was to slow economic growth relative to 2009 levels (3.8 percent).

Table 1Distribution of GDP by sector of activity in 2010
PrimarySecondaryTertiaryPublic ServicesTotal GDP
GDP growth (%)0.54.72.72.02.4
Share of GDP (%)28.721.336.813.2100
Sector contribution to GDP growth0.21.01.00.32.4
Source: DGE/DCPE
Source: DGE/DCPE

124. In 2011, despite the Government’s efforts to normalize the socioeconomic and political situation, the country’s GDP contracted relative to 2010, to approximately -5 percent, reflecting the magnitude of impact of the post-election crisis. The decline in GDP largely reflected the downturn in the secondary and tertiary sectors, with the primary sector remaining fairly stable relative to 2010.

125. Concerning prices, inflation in 2009 stood at 1 percent compared to 6.3 percent in 2008, reflecting the decline in international energy and food prices, and continuation of the tax exemption for rice. In 2010, the general index of prices, rose from 2009 (1 percent) albeit relatively moderately, at 1.8 percent compared to the community average of 3 percent. This trend was largely the result of increased prices of foodstuffs. The difficulties in supplying the domestic market with produce, partly the result of the post-election crisis, is expected to push inflation upward in 2011. In fact, inflation was estimated at 5.2 percent in March 2011. [However,] the combined effects of a relatively stable international environment, strong food crop production, and the Government’s actions to control rising energy prices and crack down on racketeering are expected to contain inflation within the community average of 3 percent.

126. In regard to the external accounts, the overall balance in 2009 was a surplus of over CFAF 127.8 billion, after a deficit of CFAF 13,5 billion in 2008. This favorable development primarily reflects the strong current account balance of CFAF 804 billion (+7.4 percent of GDP) combined with the trade balance surplus and declining structural deficits for the services and current transfers balances.

127. In 2010, the current balance was a surplus of 4.6 percent of GDP after performance of 7.4 in 2001, essentially reflecting a contraction of the trade surplus. Reduced volumes of cocoa and petroleum exports were mitigated by strong prices. The trade balance was CFAF 1731.8 billion (15.7 percent of GDP) in 2011 compared to CFAF 1392.2 billion (12.3 percent of GDP) in 2010. This improvement was due to a decline in imports and higher export prices.

128. The monetary position at end-2009 was characterized by (i) consolidated net foreign assets of CFAF 127.9 billion; (ii) a CFAF 222.4 billion deterioration in the Government’s net position; and (iii) a CFAF 180.6 billion increase in credit to the economy. The money supply, in turn, increased by CFAF 514.6 billion, to CFAF 3,511.9 billion.

129. In 2010, net foreign assets increased by 20.6 percent, net credit to the Government by 26.7 percent, and credit to the economy by 8.7 percent. As a result, the money supply increased 18.2 percent.

130. Overall, the implementation of structural reforms provided in the economic and financial program produced encouraging results, particularly in regard to public financial management based on the PEMFAR and strengthening of the institutional framework for execution of the PRSP. The execution of government financial operations was marked by the support of the development partners. Notable in this regard was the signature of an accord restructuring the Paris Club debt. Also, the Government received an allocation of Special Drawing Rights (SDR) in the amount of CFAF 172.2 billion, which contributed to the reduction of domestic arrears to further the recovery of economic activity.

Outlook

131. The Government’s economic outlook provides, inter alia, for: (i) improved macroeconomic forecasting through strengthened human resource capacities and the utilization of appropriate tools; (ii) increased tax and nontax resources through expansion of the tax base, improved collection of taxes and customs duties, the crackdown on tax fraud, and the contribution of service revenues to the Government’s budget; (iii) the continued control of current and operating expenditures to give priority to capital expenditures; (iv) improved management of public and quasi-public enterprises; (v) improved budget management through strengthening of the government budget preparation mechanism; (vi) improved fiscal management, with particular emphasis on interconnecting the different information systems and increasing transparency in public spending and the public debt management mechanism; (vii) improved monitoring of banks and financial institutions’ financing of the economy; (viii) improvement of the microfinance sector management and development framework; (ix) adoption of a consensual framework for assured intervention and disbursement by the TFP; (x) increased promotion of the Ivorian economy through international actions; and (xi) strengthened international economic and financial cooperation.

132. Through these interventions, the Government intends to achieve strong growth in the medium term to more effectively fight poverty, create jobs (particularly for youths), and ensure budgetary and external sustainability. The realization of the medium-term prospects will depend on Côte d’Ivoire’s progress in regard to security and political normalization and the execution of structural reforms to eliminate obstacles to economic growth.

Chapter 2: PRS Financing

Government efforts

133. The financing of the PRS is provided largely through budget resources and assistance from the TFP. In addition to the Government’s own revenue, budget resources are provided partly through assistance from the TFP in the form of budgetary support and partly by raising funds on the subregional financial market. The assistance from the TFP may also take the form of project grants or program grants.

134. Regarding alignment of the budget with the PRSP, the Government’s efforts resulted in the funding of a number of actions provided in the PRSP priority action plan (PAP) in the capital budget. PAPs have been used since 2010 for programming public investments and during budget conferences.

135. The Government’s budget resources consist largely of tax revenue and nontax revenue, in addition to grants.

136. Receipts and grants totaled CFAF 2368.6 billion in 2009, a 9.7 percent increase relative to 2008. Tax revenue collection improved by 10.4 percent through the concerted efforts of the revenue collecting agencies. Mobilizations of grants represented CFAF 310.9 billion, including CFAF 183.9 billion provided by the AfDB to clear arrears vis-à-vis that institution. Receipts declined in 2010, from [] CFAF 2282.7 billion, largely due to the disruption of economic activity by electric power cutoffs in the first half of the year and the post-election crisis of November 2010.

137. On an exceptional basis, the 2011 budget covered the period from April 26 through December 31, 2011 because of the post-election crisis that disrupted economic activity during the first quarter of the year. The revenue objectives are an appropriate balance between temporary support to the private sector and a gradual return to a normal recovery. The budget is based on the assumption of a gradual recovery of economic activity. In 2011, budget revenue declined sharply, reflecting the impact of the postelection crisis and tax relief measures, including suspension of payment of the car registration tax and a reduction of licensing taxes (50 percent reduction for trade licensing and 100 percent for transportation), enacted to support the economic recovery.

138. Total expenditures and net lending were executed at CFAF 2291.9 billion in 2009 compared to CFAF 2201.1 billion the previous year, or an increase of 4.1 percent, largely attributable to subsidies and transfers (31.2 percent), social services (7.8 percent), and personnel expenses (4.7 percent). In 2010, these expenditures represented CFAF 2497.7 billion, resulting in an overall deficit of CFAF 214.9 billion (-1.9 percent of GDP), which is covered by resources mobilized on the money and financial markets and external assistance.

139. The 2011 budget appropriations targeted the Government’s priority actions provided in emergency programs including the PPU, which reinforced the pro-poor orientation of the 2011 budget. The budget also aims to address the humanitarian and social impacts of the crisis, the rehabilitation of infrastructures, support for the private sector, and re-equipping of agencies.

140. Expenditures, in turn, increased from 22 percent of GDP in 2010 to 26.4 percent of GDP over the last three quarters of 2011, and targeted the Government’s priority actions geared toward pro-poor spending, which represented CFAF 840.1 billion.

141. Over the period 2009-2011, pro-poor spending totaled roughly CFAF 843 billion in 2009 (7.7 percent of GDP), CFAF 885.2 billion (7.8 percent of GDP) in 2010, and roughly CFAF 840.1 billion in 2011 (end-September 2011), or a total of over CFAF 2,568.3 billion. The proportion of these expenditures in total government expenditure is estimated at 32 percent in 2009, 30 percent in 2010, and 27 percent in 2011. These expenditures cover capital expenditures as well as ordinary expenditures executed by the ministries and other technical structures whose areas of intervention cover the sectors classified as pro-poor.

142. Based on budget data broken down by the sectors presented in the PRSP, combined PRS-related expenditures over the same period totaled over CFAF 3423 billion, of which roughly CFAF 2756.9 billion for ordinary expenditures and over CFAF 666.5 billion allocated to capital expenditures.

143. Ordinary expenditures include both operating expenditures and wages and salaries of administration officials, which are included in the analysis of expenditures relating to PRS implementation because these expenditures, particularly those relating to the social sectors (health, education, HIV/AIDS, etc.) are essential to achieving results in those sectors. To fail to include salaries and equipment for doctors and primary school teachers in government expenditures, for example, would be adverse to the entire health and education system.

144. Capital expenditures relate to all programs and projects executed by the Government and its agencies over the period 2009-2011.

145. The analyses provided in the following paragraphs essentially concern the social sectors and certain key sectors for poverty reduction, and information for all sectors is presented in the tables.

146. Over all the sectors identified, education (preschool, primary, and secondary education) received the largest amount of budget resources over the period 2009-2011. In total, the sector received over CFAF 1138 billion, representing roughly 33.2 percent of all PRS-related spending.

147.The interventions relating to investment in the sector essentially consisted of (i) implementation of the PASEF, with the objective of improving the quality of teaching and increasing the accessibility of primary and secondary schools (collèges); (ii) completing construction projects, rehabilitation and equipping of educational infrastructures (classes, offices, toilets) for populations served by the local administrations; (iii) scientific and pedagogical equipment and materials for primary schools, secondary schools (collèges and lycées); (iv) the distribution of educational kits; and (v) the establishment of the National School Nutrition Program to increase the primary school enrollment rate.

148. Over 2009-2011, the health sector received a total of CFAF 338.4 billion. In addition to this, CFAF 19.1 billion was allocated to efforts to fight poverty. The entire health sector and the fight against HIV/AIDS received CFAF 357.5 billion, or roughly 10.4 percent of total PRS-related expenditures.

149.Capital expenditures in the section related to the following interventions: (i) construction of healthcare centers, particularly in the locally administered districts; (ii) rehabilitation and new equipment for health centers outside the capital (regional hospital centers, general hospitals, and health districts) and in Abidjan and Bouake (university hospital centers, the Emergency Medical Care Service (SAMU), Institut Raoul Follereau), (iii) upgrading of healthcare structures’ technical platforms, (v) implementation of the Integrated Health Services Development Project (PDSSI), (v) implementation of the National Nutrition Program, (vi) intensification of efforts against malaria, (vii) efforts against Buruli ulcers, (viii) strengthening of the expanded vaccination program, (ix) implementation of the reproductive health and family planning program, (x) continuation of the project to strengthen the Ivorian healthcare system, (xi) expansion and equipping of the Abidjan cardiology center, (xii) implementation of the Accelerated Strategy for Infant Survival and Development Project, (xiii) continuation of the project to support prevention and treatment for victims of gender-based violence, (xiv) continuation of the Family Planning and HIV/AIDS Prevention - Phase III project, (xv) implementation of the project for prevention and treatment of STD/HIV/AIDS in sex professionals, (xvi) continuation of the treatment program for persons living with HIV/AIDS, and (xvii) continuation of the National Program to Eradicate Trypanosomiasis.

150. With over CFAF 40.4 billion in 2009, budget appropriations for the agriculture sector decreased from 38.2 billion in 2010 to 34.2 billion in 2011. Over the period 2009-2011, the sector received over CFAF 112.8 billion, or roughly 3.3 percent of effective PRS-related expenditure.

151.Capital expenditures targeted, inter alia, (i) the Agricultural Productivity Program in West Africa in regard to banana plantain, maize, yams, and traditional pork; (ii) the PNGTER, which aims to improve living conditions for rural communities by implementing a policy to provide land tenure security for operators and facilitate the resolution of property disputes and [promote] cooperative land development and management by rural communities; (iii) support for small produce growers; (iv) hydroagricultural development of the Fromagers and Haut Sassandra regions; and (vi) the revival of rice cultivation.

152. The transportation infrastructure and services sector received approximately CFAF 693.6 billion in financing over 2009-2011, or about 20.3 percent of the total resources allocated to the PRS. The expenditures in this sector increased over the period, from CFAF 194.7 billion in 2009 to over CFAF 248 billion in 2010 and CFAF 250.9 billion in 2011.

153. The budget allocations for investment were directed primarily to the following programs: (i) extending the Autoroute du Nord; (ii) the emergency urban infrastructure program to increase access to drinking water and improve the quality of infrastructure and urban services in Abidjan and Bouake; (iii) preliminary work toward construction of the third bridge in Abidjan; (iv) rebuilding infrastructure in the former CNO areas; and (v) local authorities’ implementation of basic infrastructure development projects for their respective populations.

154. Energy sector expenditures totaled CFAF 225.2 billion, or close to 6.6 percent of resources allocated to PRS implementation over the period 2009-2011. Efforts in the energy sector focused largely on rural electrification and increasing energy production capacities in order to satisfy national demand.

Table 2PRS Expenses for the Period 2009-2011, by sector (in CFAF)
SectorCurrent ExpenditureInvestment ExpenditureTotal AuthorizationTotal Payment(%) Payment
AuthorizationPaymentAuthorizationPayment
Agriculture and rural development70 354 849 52564 673 450 88082 841 671 23048 077 760 121153 196 520 755112 751 211 0013.29
Sanitation37 420 90616 751 7436 251 211 4424 235 336 1986 288 632 3484 252 087 9410.12
Consolidation of peace16 510 504 3479 992 148 6953 229 984 8022 525 898 79819 740 489 14912 518 047 4930.37
International cooperation140 653 668 350140 517 241 8599 100 552 5397 670 980 884149 754 220 889148 188 222 7434.33
Culture15 246 768 83213 831 675 2601 485 951 4511 079 675 23316 732 720 28314 911 350 4930.44
Decentralization and regional development57 719 163 19558 170 447 08435 345 910 25541 391 865 32593 065 073 45099 562 312 4092.91
Drinking water3 867 318 5633 351 408 10827 069 939 9748 483 781 61530 937 258 53711 835 189 7230.35
Education1 072 394 612 0031 037 200 119 03174 447 402 729100 821 624 1961 146 842 014 7321 138 021 743 22733.24
Employment5 472 400 8604 891 308 310811 370 024219 179 2496 283 770 8845 110 487 5590.15
Employment (Civil service)28 241 009 43532 813 387 7722 617 430 7592 600 840 24330 858 440 19435 414 228 0151.03
Energy137 844 642 120215 562 142 9083 526 277 4929 593 009 795141 370 919 612225 155 152 7036.58
Environment34 921 223 88332 209 221 0251 985 544 0962 553 049 93736 906 767 97934 762 270 9621.02
ETFP (Technical and Vocational Training Center)111 629 464 595108 547 475 33614 417 182 2075 480 232 182126 046 646 802114 027 707 5183.33
Gender150 677 80086 315 957470 517 086412 218 266621 194 886498 534 2230.01
Housing and Living Conditions105 025 147 24290 767 659 65724 498 697 80515 160 219 409129 523 845 047105 927 879 0663.09
Hydrocarbons8 932 396 20923 003 774 03164 253 69222 315 8138 996 649 90123 026 089 8440.67
Industry and Private Sector9 149 387 3268 024 737 6813 873 129 2212 443 906 52213 022 516 54710 468 644 2030.31
Infrastructure and transportation services317 024 655 191379 799 316 539352 211 551 401313 749 646 185669 236 206 592693 548 962 72420.26
Youth sports leisure31 645 601 24343 237 862 5264 357 000 0002 379 774 25136 002 601 24345 617 636 7771.33
Justice62 893 259 28559 756 320 7075 297 840 8224 054 744 64368 191 100 10763 811 065 3501.86
Mining741 575 151174 091 7671 345 007 902608 679 1182 086 583 053782 770 8850.02
Nutrition--878 546 292737 711 121878 546 292737 711 1210.02
Population602 966 44152 895 99861 085 00025 526 039664 051 44178 422 0370.00
Civil protection2 081 451 0421 653 472 273219 083 33340 257 2822 300 534 3751 693 729 5550.05
Social protection118 034 978 176108 628 491 86125 139 559 96217 151 393 944143 174 538 138125 779 885 8053.67
Post, Information and Communication Technologies1 319 512 260813 022 336150 928 60040 584 1531 470 440 860853 606 4890.02
Scientific Research12 964 820 58812 625 900 5203 285 742 7782 657 782 33016 250 563 36615 283 682 8500.45
Fishery resources11 285 800 79410 272 728 4576 008 218 3754 984 204 93317 294 019 16915 256 933 3900.45
Health284 559 157 257284 498 859 71960 565 617 53853 954 764 417345 124 774 795338 453 624 1369.89
Tourism5 184 388 2883 044 044 8783 040 707 3602 904 264 9748 225 095 6485 948 309 8520.17
HIV/AIDS8 899 055 7818 673 906 0365 289 281 32710 439 148 01814 188 337 10819 113 054 0540.56
Grand Total2 675 387 876 6882 756 890 178 954759 887 197 494666 500 375 1943 435 275 074 1823 423 390 554 148100
Expenses 2009
SectorCurrent ExpenditureInvestment ExpenditureTotal AuthorizationTotal Payment(%) Payment
AuthorizationPaymentAuthorizationPayment
Agriculture and rural development25 636 789 88420 296 052 61222 430 333 59520 090 679 22148 067 123 47940 386 731 8333.72
Sanitation11 800 0005 299 7032 077 000 0001 142 200 0002 088 800 0001 147 499 7030.11
Consolidation of peace8 054 662 8025 297 565 877637 962 851277 809 6238 692 625 6535 575 375 5000.51
International cooperation46 236 297 39746 264 376 8013 987 120 0003 979 628 72950 223 417 39750 244 005 5304.63
Culture5 151 113 8334 948 808 064380 000 000179 996 5655 531 113 8335 128 804 6290.47
Decentralization and regional development19 835 000 00020 156 100 00012 706 643 52014 988 676 45032 541 643 52035 144 776 4503.24
Drinking water1 409 325 0001 231 417 9014 321 000 0002 348 212 2595 730 325 0003 579 630 1600.33
Education355 382 726 329333 501 183 95418 144 623 36244 551 574 797373 527 349 691378 052 758 75134.85
Employment1 772 903 7301 553 504 915--1 772 903 7301 553 504 9150.14
Employment (Civil service)8 497 713 4309 810 725 979550 401 400986 297 9929 048 114 83010 797 023 9711
Energy219 197 08547 436 504 330873 607 7307 628 250 1851 092 804 81555 064 754 5155.08
Environment10 814 096 93410 486 931 227765 940 000938 489 51911 580 036 93411 425 420 7461.05
ETFP (Technical and Vocational Training Center)35 603 643 07634 689 856 8192 374 145 1001 377 808 96937 977 788 17636 067 665 7883.32
Gender49 920 00037 086 432216 400 000227 257 734266 320 000264 344 1660.02
Housing and Living Conditions33 036 526 30729 699 262 77411 311 712 0008 813 086 53544 348 238 30738 512 349 3093.55
Hydrocarbons255 919 468132 974 839255 919 468132 974 8390.01
Industry and Private Sector3 186 070 6332 801 562 7631 410 051 000638 081 0004 596 121 6333 439 643 7630.32
Infrastructure and transportation services55 238 366 40695 731 260 138100 545 789 09598 937 319 587155 784 155 501194 668 579 72517.94
Youth sports leisure9 776 870 28414 348 542 2242 200 000 000575 000 00011 976 870 28414 923 542 2241.38
Justice20 964 557 16219 386 729 0591 510 854 8831 038 356 54722 475 412 04520 425 085 6061.88
Mining330 787 00069 088 476624 590 000355 245 048955 377 000424 333 5240.04
Nutrition200 244 396394 778 442200 244 396394 778 4420.04
Population531 417 00019 243 010531 417 00019 243 0100
Civil protection874 500 000721 449 98980 000 000-954 500 000721 449 9890.07
Social protection40 571 002 90533 108 921 7027 293 745 0283 893 263 86347 864 747 93337 002 185 5653.41
Post, Information and Communication Technologies460 750 791272 403 77045 622 0008 000 000506 372 791280 403 7700.03
Scientific Research4 519 549 2674 653 311 4011 101 100 0001 012 000 0005 620 649 2675 665 311 4010.52
Fishery resources3 831 107 6213 664 507 0842 520 498 2302 120 166 1356 351 605 8515 784 673 2190.53
Health91 366 869 88193 504 996 60422 171 698 16724 466 439 648113 538 568 048117 971 436 25210.87
Tourism887 656 331807 068 450331 307 730310 801 0891 218 964 0611 117 869 5390.1
HIV/AIDS1 974 410 0001 940 403 2961 900 811 2467 053 820 1993 875 221 2468 994 223 4950.83
Grand Total786 481 550 556836 577 140 193222 713 201 333248 333 240 1361 009 194 751 8891 084 910 380 329100
Expenses 2010
SectorCurrent ExpenditureInvestment ExpenditureTotal AuthorizationTotal Payment(%) Payment
AuthorizationPaymentAuthorizationPayment
Agriculture and rural development23 058 501 26422 944 485 38541 213 706 28415 210 131 52364 272 207 54838 154 616 9083.11
Sanitation15 800 0006 814 9392 262 000 000876 542 6422 277 800 000883 357 5810.07
Consolidation of peace6 260 565 1874 081 183 745592 021 951195 140 5366 852 587 1384 276 324 2810.35
International cooperation50 665 693 74347 869 976 3204 060 918 3732 302 868 34554 726 612 11650 172 844 6654.09
Culture5 482 947 8744 236 450 290833 266 000774 769 3996 316 213 8745 011 219 6890.41
Decentralization and regional development19 650 000 00019 809 000 00011 409 798 90115 749 869 02031 059 798 90135 558 869 0202.90
Drinking water1 555 275 0001 159 064 16515 522 597 2904 001 308 67717 077 872 2905 160 372 8420.42
Education380 165 971 755376 635 659 18238 553 555 66739 857 797 115418 719 527 422416 493 456 29733.95
Employment1 820 107 9471 529 557 544665 000 600160 554 2492 485 108 5471 690 111 7930.14
Employment (Civil service)10 295 780 93712 284 786 6211 640 480 0001 118 949 19011 936 260 93713 403 735 8111.09
Energy50 216 412 00080 795 373 6232 520 307 7301 909 211 78152 736 719 73082 704 585 4046.74
Environment12 971 464 80711 342 677 990899 148 400999 100 61813 870 613 20712 341 778 6081.01
ETFP (Technical and Vocational Training Center)41 824 014 13538 397 086 3459 554 756 3142 078 185 02451 378 770 44940 475 271 3693.30
Gender63 400 90025 375 346177 500 000108 699 584240 900 900134 074 9300.01
Housing and Living Conditions37 966 219 71832 178 780 3568 499 178 5002 654 231 40046 465 398 21834 833 011 7562.84
Hydrocarbons236 964 02918 136 886 30950 000 00018 690 825286 964 02918 155 577 1341.48
Industry and Private Sector3 292 374 6952 644 231 7411 652 432 0001 057 010 4854 944 806 6953 701 242 2260.30
Infrastructure and transportation services112 929 477 709149 161 641 895138 457 832 63298 849 317 570251 387 310 341248 010 959 46520.21
Youth sports leisure10 588 089 29814 097 634 3502 157 000 0001 804 774 25112 745 089 29815 902 408 6011.30
Justice21 619 591 57020 856 932 4701 292 725 438822 525 98722 912 317 00821 679 458 4571.77
Mining177 311 94047 295 519525 076 400167 967 900702 388 340215 263 4190.02
Nutrition439 604 000119 497 245439 604 000119 497 2450.01
Population42 543 00018 988 70144 796 00017 456 92887 339 00036 445 6290.00
Civil protection781 900 000506 971 242100 000 00040 257 282881 900 000547 228 5240.04
Social protection39 435 528 23538 053 994 27312 904 278 3895 555 766 62952 339 806 62443 609 760 9023.55
Post, Information and Communication Technologies503 267 588308 894 214503 267 588308 894 2140.03
Scientific Research4 452 308 4954 037 275 6331 631 586 0001 119 819 0736 083 894 4955 157 094 7060.42
Fishery resources4 291 546 8823 462 559 8422 173 365 1801 724 180 0096 464 912 0625 186 739 8510.42
Health102 286 682 47996 632 891 66624 079 237 27618 702 720 109126 365 919 755115 335 611 7759.40
Tourism2 317 083 0131 389 390 9591 668 307 7301 748 075 2403 985 390 7433 137 466 1990.26
HIV/AIDS1 972 335 0001 806 398 5962 687 787 6432 708 315 8564 660 122 6434 514 714 4520.37
Grand Total946 939 159 2001 004 458 259 261328 268 264 698222 453 734 4921 275 207 423 8981 226 911 993 753100
Expenses 2011
SectorCurrent ExpenditureInvestment ExpenditureTotal AuthorizationTotal Payment(%) Payment
AuthorizationPaymentAuthorizationPayment
Agriculture and rural development21 659 558 37721 432 912 88319 197 631 35112 776 949 37740 857 189 72834 209 862 2603.08
Sanitation9 820 9064 637 1011 912 211 4422 216 593 5561 922 032 3482 221 230 6570.20
Consolidation of peace2 195 276 358613 399 0732 000 000 0002 052 948 6394 195 276 3582 666 347 7120.24
International cooperation43 751 677 21046 382 888 7381 052 514 1661 388 483 81044 804 191 37647 771 372 5484.30
Culture4 612 707 1254 646 416 906272 685 451124 909 2694 885 392 5764 771 326 1750.43
Decentralization and regional development18 234 163 19518 205 347 08411 229 467 83410 653 319 85529 463 631 02928 858 666 9392.60
Drinking water902 718 563960 926 0427 226 342 6842 134 260 6798 129 061 2473 095 186 7210.28
Education336 845 913 919327 063 275 89517 749 223 70016 412 252 284354 595 137 619343 475 528 17930.90
Employment1 879 389 1831 808 245 851146 369 42458 625 0002 025 758 6071 866 870 8510.17
Employment (Civil service)9 447 515 06810 717 875 172426 549 359495 593 0619 874 064 42711 213 468 2331.01
Energy87 409 033 03587 330 264 955132 362 03255 547 82987 541 395 06787 385 812 7847.86
Environment11 135 662 14210 379 611 808320 455 696615 459 80011 456 117 83810 995 071 6080.99
ETFP (Technical and Vocational Training Center)34 201 807 38435 460 532 1722 488 280 7932 024 238 18936 690 088 17737 484 770 3613.37
Gender37 356 90023 854 17976 617 08676 260 948113 973 986100 115 1270.01
Housing and Living Conditions34 022 401 21728 889 616 5274 687 807 3053 692 901 47438 710 208 52232 582 518 0012.93
Hydrocarbons8 439 512 7124 733 912 88314 253 6923 624 9888 453 766 4044 737 537 8710.43
Industry and Private Sector2 670 941 9982 578 943 177810 646 221748 815 0373 481 588 2193 327 758 2140.30
Infrastructure and transportation services148 856 811 076134 906 414 506113 207 929 674115 963 009 028262 064 740 750250 869 423 53422.57
Youth sports leisure11 280 641 66114 791 685 952--11 280 641 66114 791 685 9521.33
Justice20 309 110 55319 512 659 1782 494 260 5012 193 862 10922 803 371 05421 706 521 2871.95
Mining233 476 21157 707 772195 341 50285 466 170428 817 713143 173 9420.01
Nutrition238 697 896223 435 434238 697 896223 435 4340.02
Population29 006 44114 664 28716 289 0008 069 11145 295 44122 733 3980.00
Civil protection425 051 042425 051 04239 083 333-464 134 375425 051 0420.04
Social protection38 028 447 03637 465 575 8864 941 536 5457 702 363 45242 969 983 58145 167 939 3384.06
Post, Information and Communication Technologies355 493 881231 724 352105 306 60032 584 153460 800 481264 308 5050.02
Scientific Research3 992 962 8263 935 313 486553 056 778525 963 2574 546 019 6044 461 276 7430.40
Fishery resources3 163 146 2913 145 661 5311 314 354 9651 139 858 7894 477 501 2564 285 520 3200.39
Health90 905 604 89794 360 971 44914 314 682 09510 785 604 660105 220 286 992105 146 576 1099.46
Tourism1 979 648 944847 585 4691 041 091 900845 388 6453 020 740 8441 692 974 1140.15
HIV/AIDS4 952 310 7814 927 104 144700 682 438677 011 9635 652 993 2195 604 116 1070.50
Grand Total941 967 166 932915 854 779 500208 905 731 463195 713 400 5661 150 872 898 3951 111 568 180 066100

Contribution of the Technical and Financial Partners

155. The implementation of the PRS also benefited from support from the Government’s TFP. A portion of this support was provided in the form of budget support and is included in the budget expenditures detailed above. Other contributions from the TFP were made in the form of project support, based on framework documents adopted by the country in the different sectors and areas of the partners’ interventions.

156. The United Nations agencies (UN), through the UNDAF, aligned their interventions on the strategic pillars defined in the PRSP. The total 2009-2013 UNDAF budget is estimated at US$426,491,000.

157. Expenditures made in 2009 total US$95.9 8 million (or approximately CFAF 48 billion). These expenditures primarily financed basic social services (education, health, water and sanitation, protection, HIV/AIDS, 59.3 percent), the governance and decentralization pillar (24.8 percent), and the economic recovery and food security pillar (24.9 percent).

158. Expenditures in 2010 totaled US$57.14 million (approximately CFAF 28.6 billion), of which 47.1 percent for basic social services, 26 percent for the governance pillar, and 25.1 percent for the UNDAF economic pillar. The environment pillar (1.7 percent) received the lowest amount of financing of the UN system sectors.

159. In total, the UN spent over CFAF 76.6 billion in 2009 and 2010 on poverty reduction efforts.

Part II: Progress Toward Achievement of Results

Chapter 1: Restoring and Strengthening the Foundations of the Republic

Consolidation of Peace and Social Cohesion

Commitments made for the period

160.With regard to consolidation of peace and social cohesion, the Government has made the commitment to restore the level of trust and harmony among the people. Specifically, what is involved is: (i) setting up mechanisms for prevention and management of conflicts concerning natural resources, while adhering to the legal frameworks for managing these resources; (ii) putting in place coordinated mechanisms for monitoring, alerts, updating and regular follow-up of local preventive action plans; (iii) raising public awareness of the principles and rules of democracy, so as to create the conditions for a true national reconciliation; (iv) restoring social cohesion by combating all forms of exclusion, including nepotism and tribalism; (v) working toward the re-insertion and reintegration of vulnerable populations (women, unemployed youth, victims of war, ex-combatants and internally displaced persons); (vi) strengthening the capacities of local authorities, civil society organizations (CSOs), and the media to enable them to play a role in information, education, and communications (IEC) actions regarding citizenship.

Actions taken

161. In the context of setting up conflict prevention and management mechanisms, the Government has organized, with the support of UNOCI and a number of NGOs, several workshops and training seminars in various areas of the country, targeted at civil society and community leaders including women and religious and customary authorities. These training programs cover various modules, such as: (i) a definitional approach to social cohesion; (ii) indicators of social cohesion; (iii) values to be promoted in order to prevent conflicts; (iv) raising public awareness of political manipulation and rumors; and (v) conflict management and resolution techniques. An awareness campaign on social cohesion has also been conducted by the National Community Reintegration and Rehabilitation Program (PNRRC) in Abidjan and in the interior for target populations. UNDP has supported the establishment of local peace committees. Lastly, the Government has formulated a proposal for a national social cohesion strategy.

162. In addition, a radio broadcast on the national network, known as “Toupkè” and dedicated to peace and social cohesion, has been promoting national reconciliation through inter-ethnic alliances and joking kinship.

163. A national dialogue forum has also been organized by the Ivorian Civil Society Convention in May 2009, known as the first “national consensus” days. Following these efforts, 350 recommendations and 50 resolutions have been passed, including the creation of a national council on recovery from the crisis, composed of the State, the political class, and civil society.

164. With regard to raising public awareness of social cohesion and the principles and rules of democracy in order to create the conditions for a true national reconciliation, the Government organized several State visits throughout the territory in 2009, 2010, and 2011, particularly in the center, north and west regions (CNO). In addition, audiovisual programs and messages were broadcast about democratic practices and appropriate behavior during elections. These efforts resulted in the holding of the presidential election, in the context of recovery from the crisis, on October 28 and November 28, 2010, respectively, for the first and second rounds.

165. In addition, after the post-election crisis, the Government established monitoring and awareness-raising committees in all areas of the country. Throughout the country, these committees held several awareness-raising and community meetings and organized the days of reconciliation; the latter included socio-cultural activities and sports involving various religious, ethnic and political components of the local populations. Then, to facilitate the return to peace, the Government created and installed, on September 28, 2011, a Commission on Dialogue, Truth, and Reconciliation (CDVR). This Commission represents all levels of Ivorian society, including Ivorians living abroad and foreigners living in Côte d’Ivoire. Government missions helped to initiate the return of exiled military personnel and civilians through the signing of several tripartite agreements with UNHCR and refugee host countries. Awareness-raising and organizational missions in the Ivorian diaspora were organized by CDVR and the Department of State, Ministry of Foreign Affairs. These efforts continued in December 2011 with the holding of legislative elections, during which the people chose 255 new deputies for Côte d’Ivoire.

166. At the level of rehabilitation and reintegration of vulnerable populations, 3,430 school kits were distributed to the students and pupils in the zone targeted in 2009 under the school support program. With regard to the implementation of the income-generating activities component, 160 groups and associations composed of 9,140 beneficiaries (internally displaced persons and host populations), of which approximately 90 percent are women, have been identified in various areas of activities. The feasibility study, implementation, supervision, and training of beneficiaries were entrusted to the National Rural Development Support Agency (ANADER). In addition, out of 9,500 youth expected to find a job through THIMO (5,000) and local services platforms (4,500), 2,500 have been effectively reintegrated. In addition, the national civic service program (PSCN) has trained 2,866 ex-FAFN combatants, 1,802 former members of the self defense groups (GAD), and 5,791 youth at risk from 2009 to 2010 in various trades in the fields of agriculture and livestock, crafts, public works construction, and information and communication technologies (ICT). The National Community Reinsertion and Rehabilitation Program (PNRRC) has reintegrated 4,869 targeted persons, including 3,557 ex-combatants (ex-FAFN) and 1,312 former members of GAD in various sectors of activity, including especially agriculture and livestock, crafts, the services sector, and commerce.

167. As for war victims, major activities focused on the development of a draft ordinance on the identification of war victims and the repair of damage, as well as a census of the victims. To date, 49,697 victims have been recorded in seven Abidjan communes.

168. As for the return of internally displaced persons, the efforts of the Government and all the development partners have helped to reduce the total number of such persons. According to a UNHCR report, as of September 2011 the total number of internally displaced persons decreased from 600,958 to 279,000 (-53.42 percent), including 30,729 (11percent) on site and 249,171 (89percent) off site. With regard to Ivorian refugees in the subregion, five voluntary repatriation convoys were organized, carrying 1,013 refugees back to Côte d’Ivoire. Moreover, spontaneous returns fell by 8,022, from 171,688 in June 2011 to 163,666 in November 30, 2011.

169. In the context of fostering better coexistence between nationals and non-nationals in order to ease tensions between communities and promote full participation in the development process in Côte d’Ivoire, the Government, with the support of the United Nations system, has created income-generating activities (IGA) for 67,664 direct and indirect beneficiaries.

170. Daily papers close to the former regime, which had been occupied by armed men, were re-opened. In order to promote political dialogue, several leaders of the former regime who had been jailed or placed under house arrest in the wake of the post-election violence have been freed, and some have had their assets unfrozen. A joint mission between the Ministry of African Integration and the Ministry of Defense secured the return of 7 exiled officers and non-commissioned officers.

Analysis of results/performance

171. The awareness-raising campaigns, radio and audiovisual programming, the creation of monitoring committees, the organization of State visits, broadcasts, inter-community meetings, socio-cultural activities and sports, together with the return of IDPs, have contributed significantly to the consolidation of peace and social cohesion. This result is evident in the absence of disturbances during the first round of presidential elections in October 2010 throughout the country. The record rate of participation (84percent) and fraternal atmosphere that marked this period had raised hopes for a return to social cohesion. Unfortunately, the second round of this election, in November 2010, resulted in an unprecedented crisis that called into question all these gains. Moreover, other actions have had little or no impact on the process. There was also a low level of reintegration among vulnerable populations. Certain constraints were felt, including inadequate financing of reintegration activities, insufficient coordination of these activities, and little motivation among the target groups.

Outlook

172. Actions to be taken in pursuit of the consolidation of peace are as follows: (i) extending and completing the census of war victims to the rest of the country; (ii) providing assistance, both food and nonfood supplies, to victims, particularly IDPs; (iii) organizing the return of IDPs and Ivorian refugees in the subregion to their place of departure; (iv) continuing the identification and assessment of the damages of war; (v) organizing awareness campaigns in the areas of return of ex-combatants and IDPs; (vi) financing income-generating activities and micro-projects for war victims, ex-combatants and youth associated with armed groups; (vii) updating the national policy for the rehabilitation and reintegration of ex-combatants and youth associated with armed forces in the DDR process; (viii) adopting and implementing the national social cohesion strategy and awareness-raising in the diaspora in favor of peace; (ix) continuing to give psychological support to war victims; (x) re-activating the National Solidarity Fund for the purpose of financing interventions for low-income groups.

Restoration of State Authority and Ensuring the Security of Administrative Documents

Commitments for the period

173. In the framework of restoring State authority and protecting administrative documents, the Government undertook to (i) rebuild/rehabilitate and equip the public socio-economic infrastructures that were destroyed or damaged in the CNO regions and rehabilitate those that were degraded for lack of maintenance and upkeep in other areas; (ii) take all necessary steps to protect the process of production and issue of administrative documents; and (iii) consider the option of issuing a birth certificate according to the parents’ declaration, within a sociologically reasonable period, free of charge, owing to the poverty of the population, especially those living in rural areas, and their distance from declaration centers.

Actions taken

174. With regard to infrastructure and equipment, since 2009 the Government has been implementing, with the support of its technical and financial partners (World Bank, European Union, UNICEF, and UNHCR) the National Program for the Modernization of the Civil Registry in Côte d’Ivoire (MECCI). In this context, 15 prefectures and 95 sub-prefectures have been rehabilitated and equipped in the CNO regions. In addition, 200 command vehicles were acquired for sub-prefects, financed by the World Bank. The Ivorian State, through its de-concentrated and decentralized structures (particularly the departments) continued the work of rehabilitating and equipping socio-economic infrastructure in the CNO areas.

175. In order to ensure the security of the production and issue of administrative documents, the Government’s efforts under the National Program for the Modernization of the Civil Registry in Côte d’Ivoire led to: (i) the training of 958 civil registrars and agents; (ii) equipment of 265 civil registries; (iii) registration in civil registries of 251,275 persons born, married, or deceased in Côte d’Ivoire, who had already been registered but whose records had disappeared or had been partially or totally destroyed; (iv) issue of 3,500 birth certificates or duplicates and 700 identity cards to refugees; (v) development of a guide for computerizing the civil registration process; and (vi) the building and furnishing of two regional centers for the legal archives of civil records in Bouaké and Daloa.

176. Moreover, population enrolment made it possible to register 5,898,726 persons over 18 years of age on the provisional electoral rolls, published in November 2009. This operation also enabled the issuance of 5,160,061 national identity cards.

Analysis of results/performance

177. The rehabilitation and building of infrastructures and equipment acquired in the CNO area proved to be inadequate, essentially because of financial constraints. The actions of the National Program for the Modernization of the Civil Registry was faced with severe constraints linked to: (i) the inability to make enough State resources available to the program in order to continue its activities; and (ii) the strong dependence of this program on its financial partners (World Bank and European Union).

Outlook

178. The actions to be taken with regard to restoring the State’s authority and ensuring the security of administrative documents will consist of: (i) continuing the rehabilitation and equipping of socio-economic infrastructures that had been heavily damaged during the post-election crisis; (ii) strengthening the civil registry by setting up new declaration mechanisms, public awareness-raising, and training of civil registry staff; (iii) registering births and deaths that occurred during the crisis, under Order No. 2011-258 of September 28, 2011.

Security

Commitments made for the period

179. For the period, the State committed itself to: (i) strengthening the system for protecting persons and property throughout the national territory; (ii) restoring confidence between the people and the forces of order; and (iii) ensuring the security of the general elections.

Actions taken

180. With regard to strengthening the system for protecting persons and property throughout the national territory, the Government’s efforts have focused on (i) disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) and the dismantling of the militias; (ii) unification and rebuilding of the two armies; (iii) improving the system for protecting persons and property; and (iv) ensuring the security of the electoral process.

181. The disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) program has enabled the PNRRC to profile the various combatant forces throughout the national territory. This profiling covered a total of 38,834 youth associated with armed groups. The demobilization phase involved a cumulative total of 18,222 ex-FAFN combatants in the former areas of command of the FAFN and the dismantling of a number of self-defense groups, amounting to a cumulative total of 17,889 ex-militia members in the period from 2009 to October 2010. The PNRRC, in collaboration with the Integrated Command Center (CCI) and Army Chiefs of Staff, profiled 109,776 members of all combatant forces. A total of 32,777 ex-FAFN, 38,165 former members of self-defense groups (GAD), and 38,834 youth associated with FRCI were profiled from 2009 to 2011.

182. Moreover, in March 2011 the Government issued two ordinances, the first of which deals with the unification of ex-FANCI and ex-FAFN combatants into the Forces Républicaines de Côte d’Ivoire (FRCI), and the second with the organization of these forces. The implementation of these ordinances led to the establishment of a general staff, special forces, and the integration of 10,000 ex-FAFN troops into the new army.

183. With regard to the restoration of confidence between the population and the armed forces, awareness-raising campaigns have been conducted in the context of combating corruption, and an anti-corruption unit and military police unit have been created. A call center, reached by calling the number 100, receives complaints and reports of corruption and abuses of any kind; it has been in operation since July 2011. In addition, the number of roadblocks throughout the country has been reduced to 33, and field visits are made to dismantle illegal roadblocks. Moreover, awareness-raising campaigns have encouraged scrupulous respect for the current laws with respect to the entering and searching of homes.

184. In order to strengthen human capacities and redeploy security forces throughout the territory, 55 commissioners, 89 officers and 1,379 deputy officers have been recruited since 2009. In 2011, in connection with the normalization of security after the post-election crisis, the State appointed and promoted the general staff (police, army, and gendarmerie) and has assigned officials from these bodies to serve throughout the territory.

185. Interventions in the framework of strengthening operational capacities have focused on the rehabilitation of barracks and improving the mobility of security forces. As of 2009, the rehabilitation of 14 sites located in Bouaké, Man, Korhogo, and Séguéla was supported by UNOCI and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) with $1 million through the “election basket of funds.” This rehabilitation effort was also supported by the FISDES project in the amount of FCAF 1.984 billion, of which 729 million have been allocated. This operation is now being completed; the next step is to equip the barracks. Mobility capacities were also strengthened, with approximately 50 vehicles and several mopeds being assigned to community policing. These efforts were reduced to nil as a result of the post-election crisis. The Government has now resumed equipping the police, the army and the gendarmerie. Thus, vehicles and computer and military equipment have been granted to various components of the security and armed forces.

186. The need to combat the proliferation and illicit circulation of light weapons and small arms has led to the establishment of the National Commission to Combat the Proliferation and Illicit Circulation of Small Arms (COMNAT-ALPC). This Commission has conducted awareness-raising and capacity-building activities in collaboration with the ECOWAS Small Arms Control Program (ECOSAP), with the participation of RASALAO-CI (Réseaux d’Actions de Lutte contre les Armes Légères en Afrique de l’Ouest) and UNIFEM (United Nations Development Fund for Women). These actions included: (i) a capacity-building workshop for journalists; (ii) a national synergy/capacity-building workshop for members of the Commission; (iii) a national awareness campaign for elections without armed violence, on the theme “My vote is my weapon;” (iv) a campaign to promote the voluntary surrender of arms and munitions in the context of awareness, collection, and destruction of arms and munitions; and (v) a survey on small arms and light weapons (SALW) in Côte d’Ivoire following the crisis.

187. With a view to improving the system of protection of persons and property, the Government has implemented and extended a national program to combat urban insecurity. This has involved a more participatory management of security issues in municipalities, through: (i) the updating of 21 local participatory analyses of the security environment; (ii) the reactivation of 15 local security committees (CCS); and (iii) the training of 900 stakeholders (elected officials, population groups, forces of order, and municipal leaders) on protective security, promotion of understanding between the people and the forces of order, and the financing of projects, including projects concerning young people at risk and those aimed at promoting a safer environment.

188. Concerning the security of the electoral process, the fourth complementary agreement to the Ouagadougou Political Agreement (OPA) of December 22, 2008, provided for the demobilization of ex-FAFN combatants and the dismantling of the militias before the presidential election. To that end, the Ivorian State, with United Nations support, has demobilized 18,222 ex-FAFN combatants and dismantled 17,889 members of self-defense groups. In order the ensure the security of the elections themselves, 1,500 FDS elements and 1,500 FAFN elements were deployed, respectively, in the north and south of the country for the presidential election in 2010. Security for the legislative elections on December 11, 2011, was provided by 10,000 police, 10,000 gendarmes, and 5,000 soldiers, supported by the impartial forces of UNOCI and the LICORNE force deployed throughout the national territory.

Analysis of results/performance

189.With regard to the strengthening of security arrangements, the commitments undertaken by the Government were completely nullified by the post-election crisis. It is worth noting, however, that the two armies have indeed been unified, and the police and gendarmerie are operational throughout the country. The major constraint has been the inadequacy of specific law enforcement equipment. As for the restoration of confidence between the population and the forces of order, the results have been limited, and distrust remains despite the establishment of anti-corruption units, military police units and a call center. The primary constraints have been the low level of public awareness, lack of logistical tools for security forces, the presence of youth associated with the FRCI, and the incomplete DDR process. With respect to ensuring the security of the general elections, the mechanism put in place performed well. No major constraints were encountered.

Outlook

190. In the field of security, the Government will endeavor to: (i) ensure the security of local elections (municipal and regional); (ii) carry out the reform of the security system (RSS) with the participation of the technical and financial partners; (iii) provide the security forces with law enforcement equipment; and (iv) complete the rehabilitation of security infrastructures.

Judicial Governance

Commitments made for the period

191. With regard to judicial governance, the Government has made a commitment to: (i) increase the level of coverage of the courts and the representativeness of judicial personnel; (ii) improve conditions of detention; (iii) ensure the speedy processing of legal cases and strengthen the education and training offered in penitentiaries; and (iv) publicize laws and judicial procedures.

Actions taken

192. As for the coverage of the courts, the Government took the following actions: (i) the repair and reopening of 7 courts; (ii) the rehabilitation of 13 out of 22 vandalized prison buildings and correctional facilities; (iii) the re-equipment and opening of 12 penitentiaries; (iv) the rehabilitation and equipment of the center for the supervision of minors in Abidjan; (v) the redeployment of 52 magistrates and 59 court clerks in 2009, as well as 20 judges and court auditors in 2011.

193. With a view to protecting the business environment, a draft law on the creation of administrative courts has been referred to the Office of the General Secretary of the Government for adoption by the Council of Ministers prior to a parliamentary vote.

194. Moreover, in connection with the publication of laws and procedures to inform the public about their rights, a computerized database open to the public, composed of all the official gazettes from 1959 to 2011, together with all the international conventions, is available on line, as well as on CD and in binders. At the same time, the Government has prepared a strategy paper on the national justice policy to provide a unified reference and to integrate the judicial reforms into a strategic planning framework.

195. In the context of promoting human rights and civil liberties, the following actions have been taken: (i) the publication of a collection of international legal human rights instruments ratified by Côte d’Ivoire; (ii) the creation of a computerized database containing the entire collection of official gazettes from 1959 to 2011; (iii) the organization of a capacity-building seminar for military and paramilitary forces on the topic of human rights; (iv) a public awareness campaign, via cellular phone, on human rights; (v) the creation of a human rights police force.

Analysis of results/performance

196. With regard to judicial governance, the actions taken have allowed for the more or less effective functioning of the courts and of 22 prisons and correctional facilities out of 33. The following difficulties were encountered: (i) the presence of armed men in some prisons and correctional facilities represents a hindrance to their effective management, in particular in the interior of the country; (ii) the non-functioning National Assembly has slowed the adoption of organic laws relating to the establishment of the higher courts; (iii) budgetary constraints have obstructed the implementation of rehabilitation works; (iv) administrative problems have slowed the construction work on the Abobo courthouse; and (v) the crisis has impeded the building of new courts.

Outlook

197. With a view to meeting the commitments made with regard to judicial governance, the primarily objectives will be the following: (i) repair and equip the courts damaged by the post-election crisis; (ii) adopt the basic laws concerning the establishment of the high courts (court of cassation, court of auditors, Council of State) and the High Council of the Judiciary; (iii) prepare the judicial map; (iv) complete the work on the Abobo courthouse; (v) establish a judicial framework; (vi) create a National Judicial Training Institute in Yamoussoukro ; (vii) begin the work of building the courthouse and correctional facility in San Pedro; (viii) establish and open the administrative courts attached to the territorial jurisdictions of the existing appeals courts; (ix) adopt a law on the establishment of a legal assistance fund; (x) adopt the strategy paper for a sectoral justice policy in Côte d’Ivoire; (xi) finalize, adopt, and operationalize the national justice policy; (xii) avoid statelessness; (xiv) establish a call center; (xv) promote and develop a human rights culture; (xvi) set up human rights clubs in secondary schools; (xvii) publish a news journal on human rights; and (xviii) acquire and equip a human rights house.

Administrative Governance

Commitments made for the period

198. With regard to administrative governance, the Government has agreed to: (i) modernize public administration to make administrative services more efficient and accessible; and (ii) undertake reforms.

Actions taken

199. In the framework of reform and modernization of public administration, actions have dealt with (i) the conduct of three studies on administrative red tape, the need to build the capacity of the Ivorian public administration, and the formulation of a strategic framework for administrative reform, for which a diagnostic study is already available; (ii) the elaboration of a code of ethics and good conduct for civil servants; (iii) use of the procedure for nominating candidates for leadership posts in a number of State and para-State structures (SNDI, VITIB, CNTIG, CIAPOL, etc.); (iv) development and validation of a master plan for e-governance, which is now in the process of being adopted by the Government; (v) providing several ministries and branches of the central administration with a web site; (vi) creation of the posts of Secretary-General and Director of Human Resources in each ministry.

200. The Government has undertaken the identification of State officials and agents in 2010 and 2011 for staff planning and management. Moreover, the Government has begun the acceleration of some issues through the “drawer” mechanism, making it possible to process 11,556 cases concerning 26 documents of various types.

201. With regard to reforms, an ordinance on the general organization of territorial administration allowed for the reorganization of the territory into 5 types of administrative areas, namely, districts, regions, departments, sub-prefectures, and villages, and 2 types of decentralized communities: regions and communes. Decree 2011-263 of September 28, 2011, reorganizes the national territory into 2 autonomous districts, 12 districts, 30 regions, 95 departments, 497 sub-prefectures, and more than 8,000 villages, as regards devolution on the one hand, and 30 regions and 1,281 communes as regards decentralization, on the other hand.

Analysis of results/performance

202. As for administrative modernization, progress has been made as a result of actions taken and action plans established. Technical and financial difficulties have been encountered in implementing these actions effectively. Commitments in respect of administrative reform have been only partly fulfilled. The theoretical framework has been defined; efforts will now focus on its implementation.

Outlook

203. The Government’s efforts will mainly deal with: (i) the elaboration and dissemination of administrative procedures manuals for ministerial departments; (ii) finalization and implementation of the 3 studies already begun; (iii) finalization of the modernization of the management of government officials and civil servants by implementing the Integrated Civil Service Human Resources Information System (SIGFAE); (iv) dissemination of e-governance in the issue of administrative documents; (v) implementation of the code of ethics and good conduct for civil servants; and (vi) operationalization of the posts of Secretary-General and Director of Human Resources in each ministerial department and completion of the ADEL-IVOIRE (e-administration) project.

Economic Governance

Commitments made for the period

204. With regard to economic governance, the Government committed itself to restoring trust between leaders, institutions and the public and ensuring an equitable redistribution of national resources.

Actions taken

205. The Government has created the National Authority for the Regulation of Public Procurement (ANRMP) in 2009. The primary mission of this body is to monitor respect for the principles of good governance, including by implementing preventive measures to combat fraud and corruption in public procurement. After the launch of its activities in April 2010, ANRMP has held 16 sessions during the period, has been the object of 13 referrals, and has issued 12 decisions, including 5 in cases that were judged inadmissible.

206. Moreover, the Government, through the project Governance and Institutional Development Grant (GIDG), has continued the devolution in 2009 and 2010 of SIGFIP, the Treasury Service Database (ASTER), and SIGMAP. Its efforts have also focused on building the management capacities in the petroleum sector, the definition of a regulatory framework for the coffee and cocoa sector, and the conduct of an audit of this sector. In the remediation of public finances, the Government, with the support of its development partners, began a study in 2009 to assess the system for managing public finances based on the Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) methodology. This study has led to a program for reforming public finances, which is currently being evaluated.

Analysis of results/performance

207. The actions taken in the period 2009-2011 primarily dealt with the first commitment, with the setting up of the National Authority for the Regulation of Public Procurement (ANRMP) and reforms in the oil and coffee/cocoa sectors. The devolution of the Integrated Public Finances Management System, ASTER, and the Integrated Public Procurement Management System has had a positive impact on economic governance in Côte d’Ivoire (speedier treatment of cases, accessibility of data, transparency in the management of public procurement, etc.). The main difficulties encountered have been the persistence of insecurity, the economic division of Côte d’Ivoire, and the post-election crisis.

Outlook

208. The primary actions will deal with: (i) the restructuring of State-owned companies; (ii) the devolution of SIGFIP-SIGMAP-ASTER software packages and increasing the fluidity of interface of these packages; (iii) the production and publication of quarterly ANRMP reports; (iv) the continued production and transmission to IGF by all departments of administrative and financial affairs (DAAF) of a quarterly report on the physical and financial execution of expenditures; (v) extension of the Medium-Term Expenditure Frameworks (MTEF) process to the ministries in charge of agriculture and economic infrastructures; (vi) creation, in the Ministry of the Economy and Finances, of an economic and financial database that will decompartmentalize the sectoral information systems; (vii) creation of a centralized structure for the administration and operationalization of official development assistance, or a single window for such assistance.

Decentralization and Regional Development

Commitments made for the period

209. The Government’s commitments for the period 2009-2013 with regard to decentralization and regional development focused on (i) involvement of the population in the management of communities; (ii) building the capacities of decentralized authorities and devolved administrations; (iii) effective transfer of State functions to decentralized authorities; (iv) reduction of regional disparities; and (v) integration of the HIV/AIDS program with the development activities of each community.

Actions taken

210. With regard to the involvement of the population in the management of communities, 15 local development plans have been elaborated by the districts and departments (local authorities) with the effective participation of the population at various levels of the planning process. In order to increase the participation of women in the decision-making process, the network of locally elected women has benefited from organizational reinforcement and various types of training (50 locally elected women were trained in leadership, local participatory planning, and participation in elections).

211. The Government’s efforts to build the capacities of decentralized authorities have made it possible for these collectivities to: (i) build/rehabilitate headquarters; (ii) purchase computer equipment and office furniture; (iii) purchase vehicles; (iv) train and provide qualified staff to direct local services; (v) provide training in results-based management and human rights-based approach for 30 local officials in the Marahoué region, (vi) build the capacities of locally elected officials in participatory planning and the preparation of strategic development plans, including by disseminating the local participatory planning manual developed by the Ministry of State, Ministry of Planning and Development; (viii) participate in meetings and the sharing of experience at the regional and international levels (Belgium, Burkina Faso, Spain, and Italy); (ix) conduct pilot projects in the context of decentralized cooperation.

212. With regard to reducing regional disparities, the Government took the following actions: (i) total communalization of the territory; (ii) preparation of a guide to methodology and a procedural manual for the regional management schemes (SRAT); general advisory assistance for preparing these schemes; (v) building the capacities of the devolved services of the Ministry of Planning to prepare these schemes.

Analysis of results/performance

213. Despite the efforts at local development and provision of facilities, there remains: (i) a still timid involvement of the population in the management of local communities, which has meant a low level of ownership of the results; (ii) the absence of a consistent policy of decentralization, which sometimes causes difficulties for sustainability of the achievements in this area. The major constraint is the low capacity for mobilization of local resources and the inadequacy of resources for the financing of decentralization actions and regional development.

Outlook

214. The main actions will focus on: (i) updating and finalization of the institutional, legal and regulatory framework for decentralization based on the ordinance of September 28, 2011; (ii) development of regulations on customary kings and chiefs; (iii) redefinition of the regulations on staff of local authorities; and (iv) economic studies in the 30 regions; (v) building the capacities of prefectural authorities and local elected officials; (vi) adoption of a national development plan and a framework law on regional planning; (vii) elaboration of the national regional management scheme; (viii) elaboration of a district management scheme; (viii) elaboration of regional management schemes; (ix) establishment of a geographical information system for regional planning; (x) elaboration of a progress report on regional analysis indicators; (xi) economic studies in the 14 districts; (xii) implementation of the action matrix for the national strategy to develop the regional economy; (xiii) elaboration and dissemination of a manual on decentralized cooperation; (xiv) creation of a national agency for advisory assistance and control of the operations of territorial authorities; (xv) conduct of a technical, organizational, and financial audit of decentralization from 2001 to 2011; and (xvi) establishment of a fund to support regional development and planning.

Chapter 2: Transformation of Côte D’ivoire Into an Emerging Economy

Rural Development and Agriculture

Commitments made for the period

215. In view of the prospective attainment of the MDG related to the elimination of hunger, the State’s commitments have targeted malnutrition and food self-sufficiency based on a more competitive agriculture that would be more rewarding for the producers. These commitments aimed at: (i) turning the farmer’s job into an actual trade, for which farm operators would be prepared through appropriate technical training courses leading to a certificate or qualification; (ii) modernizing the farms at the technical and management levels by favoring a rational use of inputs and selected genetic material; (iii) improving the farm operation context, especially by addressing issues related to financing, in particular savings security, access to investment loans, subsidies, incentives and risk management; (iv) transforming and adding value to agricultural products and by-products; (v) ensuring a rational and sustainable management of rural areas through better protection and development of natural, fishery and forest resources, and through better water management; and (vi) investing in rural infrastructure, such as, inter alia, hydro-agricultural projects, storage depots and slaughterhouses.

216. With a view to the professionalization of the farming trade, the cooperatives and producers of the various agricultural sectors were the beneficiaries of capacity-building designed to provide them with the techniques necessary for rational management of their farms. Such training related to the improvement of cultivation methods, the financial and administrative management of agricultural professional organizations, accounting management and counseling support. They were financed by the Inter-Trade Fund for Research and Agricultural Counseling (FIRCA), rural development projects and the development funds of certain sectors.

217. Thus, as regards rubber growing, APROMAC through FDH contributed in 2010 to training for 102 nurserymen or nurserywomen in the areas of Abengourou, Anguededou, Daoukro, Gagnoa, Guiglo and San Pedro.

218. In the oil palm sector, a capacity-building program in accounting management and breeding ground creation was carried out for producers’ cooperatives.

219. With regard to the rice sector, the rice emergency program made it possible to revitalize 22 project management committees (CGAs) and to form 22 cooperatives. Moreover, the Rice Center project made it possible to train 1,797 rice growers.

220. As for market gardening, 12,000 producers received counseling support in respect of farming techniques.

221. Regarding the promotion of plantain cultivation, 630 producers received in 2010 training and counseling support for the production of banana shoots in six departments of the forest zone.

222. In order to promote women’s and young persons’ autonomy, 366 groupings consisting mainly of women and young persons, including 76 groupings which are members of the association of women farmers (PFACI), received training in production itineraries, post-harvest techniques, and food crop management and marketing.

223. Moreover, 8,642 women were trained in farming techniques, simplified stock management and community life management in Odienné, Ferké, Bouaké and Bouna at the initiative of NGOs (General coordination against poverty (CGLP), “Promo femme2000", Association for the promotion of craftswomen of Bouna and Gnompinin federation of Ferké) in cooperation with the FDFP with European Union, UNDP, PPMS, FAO, Centre Suisse funding and from own funds. Moreover, 103 producers were trained in food and market-gardening products marketing techniques by CGLP in Bouaké with European Union funds in the amount of CFAF 22 million.

224. Quality agricultural inputs, effective planting material and mechanical agricultural equipment was distributed to producers in the various sectors for farm modernization.

225. For the rubber sector, thanks to the Hevea Development Fund (FDH) managed by the APROMAC trade association, the quality plants supply program for plantations development helped 5,000 growers to create 12,000 ha of plantations in 13 production zone departments. Moreover, 100 small enterprises of improved planting material production of (PEPMV-hevea) were established.

226. As regards cotton cultivation, the government equipped 5,000 producers with animal-drawn implements and granted subsidies for approximately 48,000 tons of fertilizers for the cotton harvest periods 2008/2009, 2009/2010 and 2011/2012. Thanks to the reestablishment of the cotton seed production system, CNRA made quality (G3) seeds available to producers for the revitalization of the cultivation in question.

227. As regards foodstuff production, activities were carried out in the rice sector and such other crops such as corn, plantain, yam and manioc.

228. Thus, the Government, with support from the African Development Bank (AFDB), the European Union and the United Nations system provided food producer groupings, in order to reconstitute their production capital and improve their productivity, with: (i) 50 tons of food crop (rice, corn, soya and groundnut) seeds, (ii) more than 100 tons of fertilizer and (iii) agricultural equipment assessed at CFAF 203,250,582.

229. Moreover, through the West Africa Agricultural Productivity Program (PPAAO/WAAPP), 750,000 manioc cuttings, 22.6 tons of basic corn seed, 5,550 tons of commercial corn seed and 320,000 plantain shoots were produced to meet the needs of food producers.

230. Furthermore, initiatives were taken to enhance quality and compliance with health regulations in order to facilitate the access of such export products as cocoa, coffee and fruit to the international markets. That resulted in (i) increased National Laboratory for Agricultural Development Support (LANADA) capacity to control ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination, (ii) the installation of cold rooms at the fruit quay of Abidjan and (iii) the definition and dissemination of CODINORM and Codex Alimentarius food product standards. As a result of efforts made on the Côte d’Ivoire side for the determination of OTA contamination and critical points, the above initiatives also permitted discontinuing the application of provisions on coffee and cocoa standards by the European Union.

231. With regard to the resolution of problems of financing, the government, with development partner support, mobilized funds for the purchase of agricultural inputs, effective planting material and agricultural mechanical equipment for producers in various sectors.

232. Thus, for the banana sector, thanks to Export Earnings Stabilization (STABEX) funds, a subsidy in the amount of CFAF 1.6 billion was allocated over the period 2009-2011 to the provision and modernization of production equipment in 14 agro-industrial plantations.

233. As for the coffee-cocoa sector, over the period October 2010 - end of September 2011, the Government, within the framework of the “Quantity, Quality, Growth” program, used CFAF 6.99 billion for plant health treatment, the coffee-cocoa growers identification operation, and the purchase of burlap bags. The efforts made within the framework of this program made it possible to (i) treat, in 2010, 243,350 ha of plantation of 4,615 producers against mirids, and (ii) use 11,102 ha to produce cacao-tree seedlings. These activities led to an increase in the average cocoa output from less than 500 kg /ha to 600 kg/ha and to an improvement of the quality of cocoa beans exported (75 percent).

234. In the period 2009-2011, the Government released more than CFAF 30.7 billion for the revitalization of the cotton sector. This action permitted a 25-37 percent decrease in the price of fertilizers in the cotton zone; the discharging of the debts of the former Côte d’Ivoire Cotton Company (former LCCI) with respect to its 360 producers’ cooperatives and workers; and the payment of various subsidies and premiums due to the Côte d’Ivoire Textile Development Company (CIDT) with a view to the relaunch of its activities.

235. As regards the sugar cane sector, SUCRIVOIRE was in 2011 the beneficiary of a SIFCA-PROPARCO credit convention in the amount of CFAF 5.2 billion for the rehabilitation and modernization of the Zuénoula and Borotou sugar complexes.

236. As for rubber, the Hévéaculture Villageoise Development Fund (FDHV) financed the creation of new plantations in new production zones. Moreover, FDHV permitted the creation of plantations over 2,631 ha by 1,169 planters in 2009, 6,500 ha by 3,000 planters in 2010 and 12,000 ha by 5,000 planters in 2011.

237. In the area of food crops, 290 groupings of, mainly, women and young persons received, for production capital reconstitution, market gardening and food crop production kits including 45 motorized cultivators, 36 motor-driven pumps, fertilizers and seeds.

238. With AFDB support through the PADER LAC project, the government established a CFAF 170 million fund to finance Yamoussoukro, Toumodi, Tiébissou and Didiévi producers’ activities.

239. Within the framework of agricultural products and by-products development and transformation, emphasis was placed on cashew nut processing. Thus, five such processing units were financed by the Indian Government for the benefit of Côte d’Ivoire and set up in the northern zone in 2009; and a new such unit was built in Niakaramadougou in 2011.

240. Regarding oil palms, FENACOPAHCI contributed to the construction of a palm oil first processing plant in Godié.

241. Regarding shea, 435 women received training and equipment for shea nut processing in Korhogo and Ferkessédougou.

242. Regarding rubber, rubber growers inaugurated on April 1, 2009 their first rubber processing plant (ITCA) in Bouboury (Dabou).

243. Regarding rice, FENACOVICI proceeded in 2010 with the installation of a local rice treatment plant with a of 2.5 ton/hour real-time output capacity in the locality of Tiassalé.

244. In the area of water management, five hydro-agricultural projects are in the process of implementation in the departments of Boundiali and M’Bahiakro, in the regions of Goh (former Fromager), Sassandra heights, in the north-western area of activity, and in the N’Zi river valley (Eholié and Atofou) in the region of N’Zi (former N’Zi Comoé).

245. The rate of implementation is 45 percent for the 450 ha M’bahiakro hydro-agricultural project and 95 percent for the 130 ha N’Zi valley project. The projects should be completed in March 2012. These projects are co-financed by Arab funds (the Kuwait Fund, BADEA and IDB), WADB and the State of Côte d’Ivoire. Moreover, 18 irrigated areas totaling more than 400 ha were rehabilitated in the northern regions.

246. Land security activities comprised: (i) training for 23 investigation superintendents, 1,400 rural land management village committees (CVGFR) and 41 rural land management committees (CGFR); (ii) delimitation of 168 village areas; (iii) delivery of 79 land certificates; (iv) opening of 212 inquiries; (v) installation of a computerized rural land management system (SIF) in five regional agriculture directorates; and (vi) provision of the central and decentralized services in the central North and West with computer and technical equipment.

247. Regarding rural infrastructure investment, the government built technical and social infrastructure to improve working and living conditions for the rural population.

248. At the level of technical infrastructure, 13 storage depots for food products collection and stocking and four food products grouping and marketing centers of a value exceeding CFAF 70 million were set up for the benefit of more than 765 women in the areas of the Savannas, the Bandama valley and middle Cavally.

249. Through FDH, APROMAC in 2010 rehabilitated 31.5 km of village trails in the Dabou area and in 2011 helped upgrade 150 km such trails in the Bonoua, Guiglo and San Pedro areas.

250. In order to improve the living conditions of agricultural producers in general and those of the coffee and cocoa sector in particular, the government set up the Rural Areas Investment Fund (FIMR), composed of resources from coffee-cocoa sector special levies. In the period 2009-2011, this fund invested approximately CFAF 33,150 billion in social infrastructure. The work carried out included primarily the: (i) maintenance of 7,780 km of rural trails; (ii) construction of classrooms and offices and their provision with furniture; (iii) construction of 10 dispensaries, 26 maternity units and 50 health centers; (iv) construction and equipment of 5 gendarmerie stations; (v) rehabilitation of 500 village pumps and drillings; and (vi) 546 drillings.

251. With regard to agricultural sector governance, the reforms undertaken since 2009 have been related to the adoption of the National Plan for Food Security and Nutrition (PNSAN), the National Plan for Agricultural Investment (PNIA), and to the implementation of specific measures regarding the cotton, coffee-cocoa, sugar, cashew nut, oil palm and rubber sectors.

252. With regard to the coffee-cocoa sector, the Government set up a Coffee-Cocoa Sector Management Committee (CGFCC) and, by decree No. 2009-54 of February 27, 2009, created a committee tasked with outlining a new reform of the sector, based on the sector’s development policy documents. The strategic thrusts of the sector’s new reform were adopted by the Council of Ministers on November 2, 2011 and include the State’s return in the management of the sector.

253. In the cotton and cashew nut sectors, the action undertaken with European Union support of involves, regarding the former, (i) recasting the organizational and functional mechanism of the sector and (ii) building the technical and equipment capacities of the relevant inter-trade association (INTERCOTON); and, regarding the latter, a Ministry of Agriculture campaign to reform the cooperative movement.

254. In order to carry out reforms in the above sectors, the Ministry of Agriculture created on August 16, 2011 a working group tasked with to redefining the organizational structure of the management of these sectors, and to propose measures for marketing system improvement.

255. As regards food crops, the strategy for reactivating the rice sector has been transmitted to the government for adoption.

Analysis of results and performance

256. With regard to reforms and the improvement of the sectors’ competitiveness, progress is noted with regard to the cotton and coffee-cocoa sectors.

257. In the cotton sector, measures taken to ensure efficient management have favored the sector’s revitalization. Indeed, production increased from 123,864 tons in harvest period 2008/2009 to 185,000 tons in 2009/2010 (namely, by 49 percent). Sowing involved 60,000 producers and covered 186,666 in 2010; and involved 84,000 producers over and covered 256,923 ha in 2011.

Table 3Presentation of the economic situation of the country’s cotton sector, 2008-2010
YEARS200820092010
Cotton grain production (tons)119,717123,864185,000
Surface (ha)120,000140,000186,666
Yield (kg/ha)998885991
Price to producers (CFA F/kg)150185210
Farmgate sales (FCFA)17,957,550,00022,914,840,00038,850,000,000
Cotton fiber production (tons)52,22952,80681,230
Ginning yield (percent)43.6342.8843.68
Cotton fiber exports (tons)54,23844,01881,562
Average FOB price (CFAF /kg)660660726
Average fiber production sales (CFAF)34,471,140,00034,851,960,00058,972,980,000
Average fiber export sales (CFA F)35,797,080,00029,051,880,00059,214,012,000
Source: ARECA
Source: ARECA

258. The various coffee-cocoa sector reforms brought about efficient management and stimulated cocoa production through the use of effective planting material and the phytosanitary treatment of orchards. Thus, in harvest period 2010-2011 as a whole, total declared cocoa purchases increased from 1,242,294 tons at the end of September 2010 to 1,511,225 tons at the end of September 2011, namely by 21.65 percent; and exports rose to 1,440,610 tons, increasing by 16.67 percent.

259. Infrastructure investments in rural areas brought about (i) fast selling of coffee-cocoa products, (ii) availability of medicines in health centers for providing care, (iii) availability of drinking water and (iv) a higher school enrolment rate.

Outlook

260. Initiatives taken with a view to improving the productivity and competitiveness of agricultural production and developing the sectors will focus on the: (i) intensification of agricultural and livestock production systems; (ii) promotion of mechanization of farms and the small agricultural product processing units; (iii) strengthening of agricultural counseling services, and research and development; (iv) improvement of water management; (v) sustainable land management; (vi) stimulation of food crop production; and (vii) improvement of the trade context for the agricultural sectors.

261. In the coffee-cocoa area, the aim will be to set up a single regulatory and stabilization structure in charge of all operations in the sector. Subsequently, the prices to producers will be stabilized through an Average Anticipated Sales Program (PVAM) mechanism in order to guarantee to the producers a price equal to at least 60 percent of the international price. The tax rate (taxation and special levies) is capped at 22 percent of the CIF price.

262. Regarding the cotton sector, the aim will be to: (i) create a public structure exclusively authorized by the State to organize the management of the sector; (ii) set a minimum farmgate purchase price guaranteed throughout the territory; (iii) set up a cotton cultivation subsidy system and a subsidy program for cultivation with animal-drawn implements.

263. Regarding the rubber and palm tree sectors, the aim will be to continue and finalize the studies under the Seventh rubber plan and the Third palm tree plan.

264. As regards the cashew nut sector, the main activities will involve the integration of the sector into the cotton marketing system and the introduction of a broad range of incentives to the development of processing.

265. As regards the rice sector, the activities to be carried out will involve the adoption and implementation of the National Rice-Growing Development Strategy (SNDR), consisting in: (i) developing a seed-production sector in order to ensure the availability of the selected rice seeds in all production zones; (ii) rehabilitating all sites prepared for irrigated rice growing and carrying out projects for flooded plains covering a substantial surface; (iii) supporting the processing and marketing of local rice through extensive support to the private sector and the conclusion of partnership contracts between commercial processing units, consumption rice producers and seed producers; (iv) establishing a price regulation and security mechanism at the levels of rice production, processing and marketing; and (v) supporting improvements to the institutional framework and the revitalization of rice sector organizations.

Livestock and Fishery Resources

Commitments made for the period

266. Regarding livestock and fishery production, the Government has committed itself to raising the level of incomes, particularly of stockbreeders, fishermen and aquaculturalists and to meeting the country’s alimentary needs. These commitments have involved: (i) creating an environment favorable to the development of fishing, aquiculture and stockbreeding; (ii) providing the actors concerned with adequate equipment designed to preserve the quality of fishing products; (iii) building the capacities of the actors to comply with legislation and use modern methods in the areas of fishing and breeding; (iv) ensuring security of waters under national jurisdiction in order to prevent the plundering of fishing resources; (v) creating a financing mechanism for the activities in the sector; (vi) implementing programs to prevent losses from animal diseases and to limit post-capture losses in fishing; (vii) promoting the processing of slaughter products and by-products and of fishing sub-products in order to diversify the stockbreeders’ and fishermen’s income-generating activities; (viii) replenishing core stockbreeding resources ravaged by war in order to obtaining robust races; and (ix) mobilizing resources in order to support the CNRA research programs.

267. The Master Plan for Fishing and Aquiculture Development was drawn up with FAO support is in the course of adoption with a view to creating an environment conducive to the development of fishing, aquiculture and breeding. Draft laws on fishing and aquiculture and the law on transhumance are in the review stage. A request has been addressed to FAO regarding a review of the Livestock Sector Plan (PSE), currently the framework and implementation document regarding the country’s development policy. The various programs and projects prepared and currently implemented include an animal health and public veterinary care support project (PASA-HPV), the breeding development support project (PADECI), and the ranch and breeding station integrated management support project (PROGIRS).

268. The Modern Poultry Farming Strategic Stimulation Plan (PSRA), 2012-2021, has been updated. A related presentation to the Council of Ministers has been drawn up.

269. As regards the rational management of livestock and fishery resources, approval has been granted to enterprises or operators as follows: (i) 130 meat and fishing products of import or export companies; (ii) 50 fishing and animal health professionals; (iii) pharmacists and veterinarians, who have received 65 prior import authorizations (APIs) for veterinary products.

270. Regarding the provision of actors with adequate equipment designed to preserve the quality of fishing products of, the directorate in charge of the relevant policy has been equipped with five computers. The Jacqueville and Mopoyem young fish stocking stations were rehabilitated and fishing vessel monitoring beacons have been purchased. The cost of these steps has been CFAF 1.26 billion.

271. Activities carried out in order to build the actors’ capacities to comply with legislation and use modern methods in the areas of fishing and breeding the actions have consisted in training: (i) 25 fishing sector employees in the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fishing (CCPR) and in connection with illicit unregulated fishing (PINR); (ii) 39 sea-going fishermen in the duties of on-board observers; (iii) 350 stockbreeders and breeding auxiliaries in combating ticks which cause serious cattle diseases (inter alia, bacterioses).

272. In the poultry sector, FIRCA financed technical and economic management training for 40 poultry breeders, members of the Poultry Breeders’ Union (UACI) and the National Poultry Breeders’ Association (ANAVICI). In 2010, ANADER trained 363 table-fowl and 137 egg-laying fowl breeders.

273. The following steps were taken in order to improve the competitiveness of the sector’s enterprises: (i) exemption of nine enterprises from the 7.5 percent import tax on raw provender, totaling CFAF 177,657,328 in support; (ii) exemption of 1,500,000 I of fuel from the specific oil-product tax for the benefit of two small-scale fishing cooperatives, to facilitate the capture of 2,000 tons of fish; (iii) CFAF 1,608,266,994 refund to four free export enterprises of the fishery product processing sector, part of 2006-2010 State claims totaling CFAF 5,502,191,799, as a 50 percent reduction on basic water, electricity and telephone use charges.

274. The activities financing mechanism granted 15 fishery sector enterprises, including the 9 referred to above, a tax credit totaling CFAF 2,783,424,322. Of the 15 enterprises, 2 small-scale fishing firms were exempted from the specific oil-product tax and 4 free export enterprises of the fishery product processing sector received a 50 percent reduction on their basic water, electricity, telephone and oil-product charges.

275. In connection with the implementation of programs to prevent losses from animal diseases and to limit post-capture losses in fishing, the activities related to animal health permitted: (i) offering to the Professional Breeding and Fishing Organizations (OPEC) four 500 l freezers, which were given to producer groups; (ii) vaccinating 1,162,471 bovines and 1,056,269 small ruminants against contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) and small ruminants plague (PPR); (iii) training 350 stockbreeders and breeding auxiliaries in combating vectors of serious cattle diseases (inter alia, trypanosomiasis and bacterioses); (iv) vaccinating village poultry; (v) collecting collect and transmitting geo-medical information to the World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS) database of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE); (vi) inspecting 15 private clinics; and (vii) equipping disease monitoring experts with fast test kits to diagnose bird influenza and with vehicles.

276. With a view to consumer protection, health inspection and control services have: (i) inspected 113,848 tons of imported products and 8,702 tons of exported animal and animal-origin food products (DAOA); (ii) analyzed 19,392 samples in monitoring animal diseases; (iii) seized and destroyed 27.2 tons of damaged DAOA; and (iv) inspected 241,907 eggs for brooding, 35,060 brooder chicks and 40,800 imported chicks to be reared.

277. In order to ensure environmental control of poultry production units, the Government distributed sampling equipment, biosecurity products, protection supplies, laboratory reagents, vehicles and motor bikes of a value of CFAF 140 million in connection with launching the process for the acquisition of the status of a country free from highly pathogenic avian influenza.

278. As regards the promotion of product processing, the efforts of the Government made it possible to rehabilitate the Côte d’Ivoire Slaughter and Pork Meat Company (SIVAC). This upgrading of equipment translated into an increase in the controlled slaughter of better quality pigs from 22,000 heads in 2008 to 24,000 heads in 2009. The government also rehabilitated the Port-Bouët slaughter facilities in 2011 and finalized the file on the Abidjan-Anyama slaughter and livestock market complex (CAMA) construction project.

279. As for replenishing core stockbreeding resources, the steps taken to intensify the production systems permitted: (i) to inseminate 163 cows in stations and in peasant facilities with sperm from milk-producing races (Montbéliarde and Holstein) and purchasing 16 matrices and 10 calves for milk production; (ii) to purchase 40 breeders for developing bovine breeding; (iii) to create pastures with a 63 ha surface and rehabilitating a 32.5 ha germplasm area; (iv) to identify and determine the descent of 212 bovines at the Yamoussoukro station; (v) to establish 13 bovine breeding farms with 322 breeders; (vi) to get 31 beekeepers established; (vii) to acquire 75 ewes and 40 goats for small ruminant breeding development; (viii) ANADER to establish 118 grass-cutter breeders; (ix) the AfDB-financed Institutional Multisector Anti-Crisis Support project (PAIMSC/BAD) to establish 97 improved traditional poultry farms with a production estimated at 77.6 tons of carcasses, 10 pigsties and 10 sheepfolds in rural areas for village groupings.

280. In order to improve the productivity of pig raising and poultry farming, the government authorized the import: (i) by SIVAC of 30 doses of porcine sperm of the Duroc race in order to compensate for the genetic degeneration of the livestock; (ii) of 241,907 eggs for brooding and (iii) by IPRAVI of 35,060 brooder chicks and 40,800 chicks to be reared.

281. With regard to the stimulation of pisciculture, the reinforcement of National Agronomic Research Center (CNRA) pisciculture stations permits a production cycle of 100,000 young fish with an annual capacity of 1,000,000 young fish under PAIMSC/BAD.

282. The government’s efforts also made it possible to: (i) rehabilitate the National Center of Artificial insemination (CNIA), LANADA and certain infrastructure facilities of the Marahoué ranch; (ii) relaunch the activities of the Toumodi, Mankono, Yamoussoukro, Bouaké and Abidjan breeding stations; (iii) grant financing to five entrepreneurs for the creation of five bovine breeding farms.

283. Within the framework of PAIMSC/BAD, 19 departmental directorates, three pisciculture stations (at Dompleu, Loka and Natiokobadara) and two goods receipt stations of the Ministry of the Livestock and Fishery Resources were rehabilitated.

284. With regard to the mobilization of resources for research program support, CNRA received financing for: (i) young fish production in Tilapia and (ii) creation of a genetic resources data base.

285. As regards livestock and fishery resources, efforts based on the implementation of the components of the National Agricultural Investment Plan (PNIA) will make it possible to raise the income level, particularly of stockbreeders, fishermen and aquaculturalists and to improve the national coverage of animal proteins.

286. Moreover, the creation of an environment favorable to the development of fishing, aquiculture and livestock breeding will require the: (i) adoption and promulgation of policy documents (the laws on agricultural orientation, fishing and transhumance) and strategy documents (Fishery and Aquiculture Development Master Plan and Livestock Breeding Sectoral Plan); (ii) implementation of the Strategic Plan to Revive the Poultry Industry (PSRA); (iii) strengthening of transhumance and cattle itinerary management; and (iv) establishment of autonomous livestock-breeding and fishery development structures.

287. Measures currently developed in relation to the regulation of activities connected with the production of animal and fishery resources include in particular the establishment of (i) a framework for exchanges between the Ministry in charge of the animal and fishery resources and the sector’s operators in order to supply the market with meat and fish within the framework of the fight against the high cost of living and (ii) coordination committees regarding water stretches with a view to the implementation of a code of good fishing practices.

288. Regarding the rational management of animal and fishery resources, the strategies envisaged consist in: (i) protecting and safeguarding fishing resources through the sustainable, coordinated and responsible management of water stretches; (ii) developing aquiculture, (iii) processing and developing fishery products; and (iv) strengthening the animal production system through the rehabilitation of ranches and stations.

289. As regards building the capacities of the sector’s actors, stress will be laid on (i) structuring the sub-sectors and supporting the stockbreeders’ and fishermen’s trade organizations (OPEC); (ii) improving the collection and the processing of statistical data and the information systems of help to decision making; (iii) building the institutional and human capacities of the administration in charge of the sector; and (vi) rehabilitating and equipping the productive apparatus.

290. Action taken with regard to implementing programs to prevent losses from animal pathologies and epizootic diseases concerns: (i) strengthening the national sanitary mechanisms; (ii) conducting compulsory vaccination campaigns; and (iii) inspecting the DAOAs.

291. As for the tuna sub-sector, the aim is to broaden (i) access to inexpensive raw material (frozen tuna), and (ii) the production base and access to value added through distribution and marketing.

Infrastructure and Transport Services

Commitments made for the period

292. As regards infrastructures and transport services, the Government has committed itself to: (i) provide access, over roads suitable for vehicles in any season, to all of the country’s sub-prefectures, villages and possibly camps, and connect them to an effective network of interurban, urban and international asphalt roads; and (ii) develop the country’s railway, port and airport infrastructure to make it highly competitive and thus turn Côte d’Ivoire Hub into a key trade at the West African and global levels.

293. In particular, the objectives have been to: (i) improve governance in the sector of infrastructure and transport services; (ii) build the operational capacities of the institutions in charge of roads, and to rehabilitate, develop and ensure the maintenance of road infrastructure; (iii) develop the port, airport and railway infrastructure; and (iv) improve access to transport services.

Actions taken

294. In order to meet the commitments made with regard to infrastructure and transport services for the period 2009-2011, the State carried out certain activities with technical and financial support such development partners as, inter alia, the World Bank, BADEA, IDB, the Kuwait Fund, WADB, EBID, the OPEC Fund, the AfDB, the Dutch development bank (FMO), the European Union and SFI.

295. With regard to the component of improvement of governance in the infrastructure and transport services sector, the Transport Sector Adjustment Investment Credit Program (CI PAST) was adopted and made possible the reorganization of the institutional framework and the adaptation of the legal and regulatory framework of such structures as DGTTC, SONATT, AGETU, AGEROUTE, FER, ANAC, SODEXAM and OSER were carried out. At the same time, as this program of a residual amount of CFAF 12 billion is relaunched, the main components selected concern primarily road maintenance and safety.

296. The general convention on sea-related issues held in September 2011 made it possible to adopt a new maritime policy, whose priority works concern inter alia the revision of the merchant navy and of the ports code, the creation of national maritime companies, and the construction of modern fishing infrastructures in the ports of Abidjan and San Pedro, in Sassandra and in the other coastal cities. Moreover, the certification of the international Félix Houphouet-Boigny airport under Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) safety standards and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) security standards is in progress. In that context, the National Civil Aviation Agency was transformed into the National Civil Aviation Authority (ANAC).

297. Activities carried out in order to build the operational capacities of the institutions in charge of the roads concern: (i) re-equipping AGEROUTE with vehicles; (ii) re-equipping the South East Highway Development Company (SODASE) with computer material, furniture and vehicles; and (iii) acquiring technical materiel for the Construction and Building Works Laboratory (LBTP).

298. Regarding the component of road infrastructure development, the work carried out concerns mainly the rehabilitation of the Guibéroua-Kossewa section (36 km), the Grand-Bassam road works (3.2 km), the drainage of the Yopougon Kouté road system (0.9 km), emergency work on the road network, and the broadening of the road at the Zoo Crossroads.

299. Relevant construction projects include the work undertaken within the framework of the Urban Infrastructure Emergency Program (PUIUR), which made it possible to build approximately 20 structures and 76 culvert type constructions involving the installation of 6,000 concrete and 4,700 metal tubes on the road network. Moreover, careening work has been completed on the Bettié and Grand Lahou ferryboats, which have been delivered and put in operation.

300. Numerous other road infrastructure development projects are under development. They comprise approximately 50 crossings and approximately 20 structures, including the Willamsville-Adjamé footbridge. Construction work on the third Abidjan bridge and the Jacqueville bridge began again in 2011. Moreover, the environmental and social impact study for the construction of the Bouaflé bridge over Marahoué was updated.

301. Regarding the extension of the northern highway, which comprises three sections, the overall estimate of work carried out as at end November 2010 was of 90 percent for the Singrobo-Taabo section (27 km), 71 percent for the Taabo-Toumodi section (30 km) and 75 percent for the Toumodi-Yamoussoukro section (32 km). The work carried out over the same period for the construction of the 124 km of the Boundiali-Tingrela-Mali section accounts in total for 2 percent. Regarding the asphalting of the 28 km Bingerville-Eloka-Ebrah axis, the total rate of advancement is of 53 percent. Asphalting has started on the Abobo-Akeikoi access road. At the level of urban roads, 680 km of national roads are under construction.

302. Regarding road rehabilitation and maintenance, work was carried out in 2009 on the Arrah-Bonahouin road (12.3 km) and the Ebilassokro-Zarounou road (5 km). Maintenance work on the 88 km Tankessé-Transua-Koun Fao road re-established access to the Transua sub-prefecture. In Odienné city, 33 km of road were streamlined and 1.3 km of asphalt road and various constructions built with European Union support.

303. In the period 2010-2011, financing by the Road Maintenance Fund (FER) made it possible to complete surface repair work on the Singrobo-Yamoussoukro section (approximately 100 km). The rehabilitation included repairs to a 45,000 square meter roadway surface on 134 km of roads in Abidjan and San Pedro; improvement at the level of service on 43 itineraries accounting for 4,000 km surfaced interurban roads 577 km of unsurfaced routes; and treatment of critical points on 3,100 km of unsurfaced routes. By means of the HIMO method, 1,741 km of surfaced national routes were regularly maintained through undergrowth clearing work and drainage cleaning.

304. With regard to the rehabilitation of road markings and signals in Abidjan, the work carried out in under PUIUR have been completed and the works were provisionally received on August 25 and 26, 2010.

305. Work in progress consisting in repairing the road network as a whole consist in reshaping the 45 km Toulepleu-Blolequin road and the rehabilitation of the Riviera 2 interchange, the access road to the military hospital, the CHU - Vridi - Port area section, and the Man, Agboville, Bouaké, Gagnoa, Korhogo, Ferkessédougou and Yamoussoukro road systems. Road reinforcement work has begun on the Akoupé-Abengourou-Agnibilékro section. Moreover, in the Guibéroua, undergrowth clearing has taken place on three sections to the extent of 10 percent, while in Ferkessédougou, Bilimono under-prefecture, the work began again on September 2, 2011, with an implementation rate of 67 percent.

306. There are three completed studies, namely one on the laying out of 370 km of trails in the Taï Park; one on the rehabilitation and reconstruction of coastal sections; and one on the Bouna - Doropo - Burkina border and Bondoukou - Ghana border sections (105 km). The study on the Taboo-Prole road (22 km) has been carried out to the extent of 25 percent. The feasibility studies on the construction of 484 km trunk of national roads are at the detailed preliminary draft (APD) stage.

307. The study on the construction of the Tiebissou-Didiévi-Bocanda section (92 km) has been updated. Concerning the ferryboats rehabilitation program, the studies have been completed but the rate of implementation of the physical work itself, planned since 2009, is only 45 percent.

308. Regarding the port sub-sector, all projects under the Abidjan Port development program are still at the study stage. This concerns: (i) the APD study, economic and financial feasibility study and the environmental impact study for broadening and deepening the passage of entry into the Vridi canal; (ii) the technical studies for the establishment of the channel of access to Bouley island and a swinging basin; (iii) the summary APD study for the construction of a ballast tank emptying station at the port of Abidjan; and (iv) the study for rehabilitation and modernization of the Abidjan fishing port.

309. Regarding the Port of San Pedro, the emergency repair of the western pier has been completed. Building of the waste incinerator of the environmental management program has been carried out to the extent of 50 percent. Feasibility studies are under way for the construction of a new terminal for containers, the development of 150 ha of port land, the updating of the port master plan, the asphalting of the Danané-Zerekore (Guinea) and Odienné-Bougouni (Mali) sections, and the construction of a bridge over the Cavally river in order to facilitate the movement of goods towards the adjacent countries.

310. At the level of the airport sub-sector, the efforts of the Government led to the : (i) rehabilitation of the Regional Aeronautical Medicine Center; and (ii) creation of a steering committee over all civil aviation structures with a view to the opening of the Academy for Civil Aviation and Meteorology Professions. Moreover, the project for the creation of the new airline company has been finalized and the planes marked “Air Côte d’Ivoire” are expected to start flying in the first quarter of 2012. Furthermore, the APDs and the search for financing by the State for the rehabilitation and strengthening of domestic airports (Yamoussoukro, Bouaké, Daloa, Korhogo, Man, Odienné, San Pedro, Bondoukou) are finalized.

311. In order to enhance safety and security at the Abidjan airport of according to FAA standards, the system of production and of distribution of new badges of access was improved.

312. At the level of the railway sub-sector, the main steps implemented have concerned the restarting of maintenance work for the rehabilitation of the roads and the real estate heritage of Abidjan.

313. In order to improve the access to transport services, the actions carried out for the road sub-sector have concerned the opening of operational license centers in Yamoussoukro and Daloa. In addition, transporters had in 2011 the benefit, through the intervention of the Road Transport Development Fund (FDTR), of the delivery of 112 vehicles and of capacity building for the future creation of the Côte d’Ivoire Federation of the Transport Enterprises (FETCI).

314. As part of the rehabilitation component, work on the Large-Bassam bus station and the OSER training center has been completed. Moreover, the Korhogo single counter arranged, organized and equipped, is currently operational. Furthermore, the rehabilitation of the Automobile Technical Control Company (SICTA) station is in the process of being completed.

315. As part of the equipment component, the operational capacities of the administration units and implementation agencies of the sector were strengthened through the acquisition of furniture, computer material and vehicles. In this connection, the Yopougon and Aboisso SICTAs were automated and each one was equipped with a mobile station. Moreover, public awareness campaigns and let us telethons were organized addressing the users, drivers and law-enforcement personnel on disasters caused by accidents, the spread of HIV/AIDS and racketeering.

316. At the level of the maritime, river and lake sub-sector, the activities undertaken permitted the construction of wharf and quay for maritime and port business and the rehabilitation of a technical building for the Coast Guard at Marcory.

317. In terms of equipment, the Regional Academy of Maritime Sciences and Technology (ARSTM) and the Sailors’ Health Center (CSGM) received from medical goods and supplies. In addition to the satellite surveillance materiel offered by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to the Directorate General for Port and Maritime Affairs (DGAMP), this structure acquired rubber dinghies, radars, vehicles and data processing equipment. The supply, installation, start of operation and maintenance of a maritime HF/VHF wireless communication network and the supply of high-speed motorboats to the Coast Guard are being implemented.

318. At the level of the railway sub-sector, a business plan was prepared for starting in January 2012 a new high quality service guaranteeing passenger security and aiming at the development of passenger traffic. Accordingly, the tracks were rehabilitated, and, of 21 carriages, 13 were restored, and so were the Bobo Dioulasso and Treichville stations.

Analysis of results and performance

319. Action with regard to roads made it possible to ensure the connection of the localities frequently visited with the existing network of asphalt roads and the creation of access to certain villages.

320. At the airport level, the concession of the establishment and operation of the Abidjan airport to AERIA made it possible to have at the Felix Houphouët-Boigny international airport in Abidjan an annual passenger traffic of more than 900,000 passengers in the period 2009-2010. Freight increased by 24,9 percent, namely from 9,915 tons in 2009 to 12,387 tons in 2011. However, the country’s air transport does not do justice to its potential. Not only the Felix Houphouët-Boigny international airport is still not certified on the basis of FAA and TSA standards, but also the country’s other airports and aerodromes are characterized by poor condition of the tracks, and insufficiency and obsolescence of navigation assistance, communication and security equipment.

321. Regarding transport services, the reforms and the actions undertaken in the sector made it possible to improve the passenger and goods traffic. Thus, at the level of interurban road sub-sector, the creation of a number of small bus-stations, of private passenger and goods transport companies and the development of interurban passenger transport through the introduction of a fleet of more than 1,300 high-capacity coaches made it possible to operate more than 90 connections and to transport approximately 25 million passengers per year. The road transport of goods has experienced an average annual growth estimated at 14.5 percent. This sub-sector is confronted with the issues of fluidity and traffic-related problems which reduce its efficiency. These obstacles cause losses suffered by the national economy and assessed at more than CFAF 100 billion per annum.

Outlook

322. Generally speaking, the sector of infrastructure and transport services suffers from insufficiency of appropriate resources for implementing the various projects. In particular, the infrastructure is characterized by a lack of maintenance and renovation. The extent of the problem requires an urgent and comprehensive nationwide response in order to facilitate the movements of persons and goods.

323. With regard to roads, in order to facilitate circulation, it will be appropriate to carry out surface repairs to the existing network in the short run, construct on an annual basis an additional capacity of at least 1,000 km of asphalt roads, 5,000 km of extensive resurfacing and 1,000 works of various sizes for the re-establishment of interrupted connections or the creation of non-existent connections. The urban roadway network will be developed, with the ambition to attain a 15 percent expansion of that network by 2013, in order further to improve the urban environment and the population’s living conditions.

324. With regard to road transport services, it will be appropriate to ensure the reinforcement of a partnership between financial institutions, concessionaires and transporters in order to extend bank loans to the latter for the purchase of new vehicles, and adapted to operating conditions in the country, by category of transport.

325. In the area of ports, it will be appropriate to ensure the upgrading and modernization of the equipment, the adoption of new methods of organization and the implementation of expensive investment for the modernization and development of port infrastructure. Regarding the port of Abidjan, it will be necessary to improve sea and land access in order to boost traffic, enhance the capacity of handling and storage of goods and containers, and expand industrial zones in order to permit the establishment of new industries. Regarding the port of San Pedro, it will be appropriate to create a new container terminal, to upgrade the area in order to favor the development of industrial and logistics activities, and prepare terminals specialized in cereal and fishing products. These steps will be supported by the road interconnection with Mali, Guinea and Liberia and the construction of a railroad connecting Man to San Pedro to facilitate the transport of raw materials, namely ore.

326. In the maritime area, the prospects consist in the implementation of the resolutions of the general convention on maritime affairs, and of the policy of boats serving as buses with private operators to solve the problem of passenger transport in the district.

327. In the railway area, it will be appropriate to double and modernize the current network and to expand the fleet of carriages and locomotives in order to increase passenger and goods traffic. A plan for railway development must be drawn up for the western part of the country.

328. In the civil aviation area, it will be appropriate to build a second full-fledged international airport at Yamoussoukro and to upgrade the San Pedro airport in order to strengthen its role as an economic and tourist center. With regard to services, it will primarily be appropriate to reinforce the conditions favorable to the FAA and TSA certification of the Felix Houphouët-Boigny airport.

Mines, Energy and Hydrocarbons

Energy

Commitments made for the period

329. The overall objective of the electricity sector is to ensure energy security in a sustainable manner in order to provide the population with quality energy accessible to all and exportable. To attain this objective, the Government committed itself to: (i) increasing the electricity output; (ii) provide power to 200-300 additional rural localities per annum; (iii) intensifying network extensions in the peri-urban zones; (iv) improving the population’s access to energy services; (v) subsidizing the connection of disadvantaged group; (vi) diversifying energy sources by favoring renewable energies; and (vii) participating actively in the process of interconnection of the sub-regional power networks.

Actions taken

330. The efforts of the State and its partners related to the reinforcement of the governance framework of the electricity sector. Thus, for power supply security, the plan of supply/demand equilibrium of the power system was updated and a plan was drawn up for the consumption of natural gas by the coal- or oil-fired power plants. These two documents were distributed to the various actors of the electricity and hydrocarbons sector. For the regulation of the activities linked to the radioactive resources of Côte d’Ivoire, a bill has been drawn up, amending law No. 98/593 of November 10, 1998, on protection against ionizing rays and nuclear safety. In addition, a study on rates was validated during a workshop held in December 2011.

331. Activities in progress concern the: (i) completion of the reform of the institutional framework of the power sector, particularly through the organization and operation of the new entity resulting from the dissolution of SOGEPE and SOPIE; (ii) validation of the national energy policy document; (iii) drafting of the bill on the Electricity Code; (iv) examination of the application of the recommendations of the study on rates; (v) development of a national plan for improving access to energy; and (vi) creation, organization and operation of the National Authority for Nuclear Protection and Security (ANRSN).

332. Moreover, the State continued its efforts for the development of the hydroelectric potential and gas-fired power plants. Thus, the work of the third stage of the CIPREL gas-fired plant (110 MW) was completed in December 2009 and operation began in the first quarter of 2010.

333. The contract for the implementation of phase 3 of AZITO regarding the construction of a steam turbine of 150 MW was signed in October 2011 and the construction work should be completed at the end of 2014. On December 20, 2011, the State signed an amendment (amendment No. 6) to the power production contract with CIPREL for the implementation of the fourth stage of the gas-powered plant, for an output equal to 2x110 MW (open cycle/vapor cycle).

334. En 2010, in order to correct the energy deficit (energy crisis of February 2010 - May 2010) caused by a breakdown in the Azito power station and the interruption for maintenance work on the 110 MW CIPREL turbine, the State imported energy from Ghana and leased generators with a guaranteed capacity of 70 MW for a period of two years. Negotiations are in progress with the AGGREKO group in order to increase that capacity to 100 MW, starting in August 2012 electrify.

335. The efforts of the Government also related to the rehabilitation of the existing infrastructure. In that framework, work for the rehabilitation of the Buyo dam began in 2009 and the repairing of Vridi turbine No. 2 are still in progress.

336. As part of rural electrification, 141 new localities were provided with power through the conventional system, at a cost of CFAF 13.405 billion, funded by the electricity sector.

337. The villages of Gligbeuadji in the Méagui sub-prefecture and of N’gbandobonou in the Sakassou sub-prefecture have been provided with public lighting by a photovoltaic solar system within the framework of a pilot project. Moreover, the localities to be supplied with power were identified within the framework of the project for the promotion of renewable energies by decentralized rural mini-networks for the development of income-generating activities. The final document of the project was submitted to FEM for approval, and the mobilization of State funding is in progress.

338. As regards network expansion in the localities already supplied with electricity, work for 87.1 km of the MT network, 200.4 km of the BT network and 4,614 EP households has been carried out.

339. The State and its development partners have made efforts to achieve energy savings through, in particular, the definition of energy efficiency measures in the households, and the production and the dissemination of a film for raising awareness of saving energy. Preparatory studies and the formation of work teams within the framework of solutions to fraud, theft, and acts of vandalism against and lawless occupation of the power network were carried out. Within the framework of energy saving in public buildings, 27 condenser batteries were installed, in 2009, out of the 13 sites identified.

340. In 2011, the supply and installation of five batteries of a total power of 90 KVar, were carried out at three sites (CHU of Cocody, Prefecture of Yamoussoukro, and CHR of Korhogo) at a cost of CFAF 7,8 million, financed by the State. The first audit-related work on lighting and air-conditioning systems in public buildings was completed in October 2010 and concerns data collection, processing and analysis. Concerning the project of dissemination of low consumption lamps, the basic research and the definition study have been completed but the “lamp dissemination” component is in progress.

341. The implementation of inter-connections between power networks of Côte d’Ivoire with those of Mali, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea is in progress. As regards the interconnection Côte d’Ivoire (Ferké) - Mali (Zégoua), the rate of progress of the work as at the end of December 2011 was 85 percent. The contracts relating to the expansion of the Laboa station and the building of the Laboa-Boundiali-Ferké transport line of were awarded in June 2011 and await implementation. Concerning the Côte d’Ivoire-Liberia-Sierra Leone-Guinea interconnection, the feasibility and environmental impact studies are available.

Analysis of results and performance

342. The efforts undertaken by the State and its partners made it possible to increase the overall installed production capacity from 1,200 MW in 2008 to 1,390 MW in 2010. Thus, total electrical energy production increased from 5,513 GWh in 2008 to 5,993 GWh in 2011, which translates into an improvement in meeting the needs of consumers.

343. The attainment levels of the indicators of the sector improved. Indeed, the penetration rate of electricity or the proportion of localities with power supply increased from 31 percent in 2008 to 33 percent in 2010. The proportion of the total population living in a locality with electricity increased from 71 percent in 2008 to 74 percent in 2010. The proportion of the households having access to electricity also increased, from 20 percent in 2008 to 25 percent in 2010. However, the electrification of 47 localities/year on average in the period 2009-2011 remains largely inferior to the objective of 200-300 localities to receive power in a year.

344. The difficulties encountered in the implementation of the activities of the sector are primarily of a financial nature. Most of the amounts requested for the implementation of the measures envisaged are partially allocated. That is also true about co-financed projects, for which the State does not mobilize its contribution in time.

Outlook

345. The main activities envisaged will relate to the: (i) development and implementation of the Electricity Code; (ii) validation of the national energy policy document; (iii) the auditing of the financial debts of the power sector; (iv) reduction of non-technical losses (fight against fraud, theft and acts of vandalism); (v) updating of the production and transport master plans; (vi) modernization of the system of tele-control and management of distribution networks; (vii) sensitization of households to energy saving; (viii) promotion of renewable energies; and (ix) large-scale electrification of rural localities through decentralized photovoltaic solar systems.

346. In the framework of the revitalization of the project for the construction of the Soubré dam (270 MW), negotiations with Chinese enterprise SINOHYDRO for the construction and exploitation of this project will continue with a view to its effective implementation.

Mines

Commitments made for the period

347. The main objective of the mines sub-sector is to enhance the national mining production through the greater and more sustainable development of the mining potential, and the intensification of mining research, for a more important contribution to economic and social development.

348. In order to achieve this goal, the Government has committed itself to: (i) reviewing the legal and institutional framework; (ii) building the technical and material capacities of the national structures; (iii) improving the geological and mining information system; (iv) to promoting national and foreign investment in the mining sector; (v) strengthening the framework for small-scale and semi-industrial operations; and (vi) to prepare the basis for a processing industry.

Actions taken

349. At the level of creating more attractive conditions for foreign investment, the Government proceeded to review the portfolio of licenses, which should lead to the renewal or the attribution of licenses to operators having proven technical and financial capabilities. Moreover, the exploitation of the country’s most important gold deposit (a reserve of more than 120 tons), discovered at Tongon in the Korhogo department in 2009, has begun. To this important deposit one must add those already in exploitation in the localities of Ity, Angovia and Bonikro. For manganese, exploitation proceeds primarily in the area of Bondoukou and production was 83,567.230 tons in 2009 and 40,401 tons in 2011.

350. For a better assessment of the mining potential of the country’s subsoil, geological maps of the departments of Daloa, Gagnoa, Sassandra, Soubré and Tabou were drawn up in 2009. Other work is pursued on information of interest for the scientific geological infrastructure, fundamental to mine research, and consists in particular in 1/100000 scale cartography, 1/2000000 scale recognition cartography, a 1/500000 scale geological synthesis, and a 1/1000000 scale geological synthesis.

351. Moreover, prospecting and reserve assessment work is currently carried out by SODEMI on the deposits of iron at Monogaga and of phosphate at Eboinda. State support in the period 2009-2011 for this work amounted to CFAF 124,431 million.

Outlook

352. The main activities will concern: (i) advocacy by the State for the lifting of the embargo on diamonds; (ii) the improvement of the procedure for granting licenses; (iii) the finalization and availability of basic means essential to mining exploration; (iv) the revision of the Mining Code; (v) the development and validation of a mining policy document; (vi) the search for new investors; (vii) prospecting and assessment of zones lending themselves to small-scale mining.

Hydrocarbons

Commitments made for the period

353. The main challenge of the sub-sector of hydrocarbons is to raise the level of production in order to meet the national consumption needs and to increase the public revenue. To that end, the government committed itself to: (i) strengthening investment; (ii) enhancing the oil-products transport and storage infrastructure; and (iii) ensuring a transparent and participatory management of resources generated by the sector.

Actions taken

354. In order to promote investment in the sector, the draft Hydrocarbons Code and the draft standard production-sharing contract annexed to that code were drawn up. Moreover, the capacities of the agents of the sector were enhanced, particularly as regards negotiation and follow-up of oil contracts, monitoring and control of oil costs, promotion of the sedimentary basin, monitoring of the implementation of the Environmental and Social Management Plan (PGES), and oil revenue forecasting, in cooperation with the World Bank, within the framework of the Governance and Institutional Development Grant (GIDG).

355. A number of studies were carried out. The first related to the Strategic Environmental Assessment (EES), which identifies the social and environmental impacts of oil projects. The second related to regulation and environmental standards and rules. The study on the revision of the structure of oil product prices is in progress. The division of the sedimentary basin into “ultra-deep” zones is under way.

356. As regards the strengthening of oil product transport and storage infrastructure, GESTOCI undertook the construction in Abidjan of two spheres, of 2,000 tons each, for the storage of butane gas. A 4,000 ton sphere with filling plant with a production capacity of 300 tons/day is also in the process of construction by PETROCI. A fourth sphere, of 1,500 tons, is currently constructed by the African Petroleum Products Storage Company (SAEPP). All these spheres will be delivered in 2012.

357. With regard to the refining sector, in order to ensure the continuity of the activities of the Abidjan refinery, SIR, thanks to an AFREXIMBANK/BIAO loan of CFAF 160 billion, has proceeded with the installation of the “preheating line” mechanism in the main distillation unit. Moreover, in 2010, negotiations between the State and a local banking group permitted the resumption of the financing of crude oil processing activities. Furthermore, a decree has been signed, authorizing the operation of a bitumen depot in order to increase the production and the national capacity of bitumen storage by SMB.

358. As regards the oil products transport infrastructure, work for the construction of the Abidjan-Yamoussoukro-Bouaké pipeline and transformation of a 12-inch kerosene line into a butane line at the SIAP wharf is in progress and will be completed at the end of 2012.

359. The service zones of oil depots have been redefined. Oil product distributers are progressively returning to the former CNO area.

360. At level of the transparent and participatory management of resources generated by the sector, Côte d’Ivoire, which has acceded to the initiative of for transparency in the mining industries (ITIE), has created an ITIE committee and publishes regularly, in accordance with the commitments entered into, information on the management of resources generated by local mining activities. (List the available reports.)

Outlook

361. The activities to be carried out will concern the: (i) completion of the reforms of the Oil Code; (ii) reassessment of the sedimentary basin; (iii) promotion of search for oil in deep waters; (iv) reactivation of the Petroleum Action Fund; (v) creation of a regional oil- and gas-products exchange; (vi) settlement of the State debt to SIR; (vii) improvement of the access of the population and of the enterprises to oil and gas products.

Employment

Commitments made for the period

362. With regard to employment, the government’s objectives are specifically aimed at: (i) increasing employment opportunities through highly labor-intensive works, support for income-generating activities and self-employment; (ii) providing better access to employment for young persons holding a degree and or having no qualifications; and (iii) building the national capacities for governance with respect to employment and the labor market.

363. In the framework of economic stability and recovery, the objectives pursued by the Government are inter alia: (i) the negotiation of the renewal of the agreement protocol on social truce and the revision of the Labor Code in order to adapt it to the requirements of the country’s economic and social development.

Actions taken

364. Most of the activities carried out in order to increase employment opportunities through highly labor-intensive works have concerned: (i) vocational and technical training; (ii) enterprise management and assistance in establishing a micro-enterprise; (iii) the creation of income-generating activities; (iv) the establishment of framework for dialogue at the local level between civil society and the economic operators in order to create the conditions for mediation between supply of and demand for labor; and (v) the establishment of guarantee funds in order to facilitate access to credit for prospective self-employed workers.

365. Côte d’Ivoire, with the support of its partners, implemented in the period 2009-2011 various projects and programs which made it possible to integrate or reintegrate young persons. Such initiatives are in particular: the Post-conflict Assistance Project, the National Plan for Community Reintegration and Rehabilitation, National Civic Service Program, and the Employment Generating Initiatives Development Program (WONDER). As a whole, these projects and programs made it possible to reintegrate 38,241 persons (former combatants or former members of self-defense groups) into the socio-economic fabric. Moreover, 7,584 high-risk young persons have been trained and will soon be reintegrated.

366. With regard to access to employment for young degree-holders, the government has made considerable efforts despite the difficult economic context. In the period, the Government recruited 3,900 degree-holders in the health sector and 4,535 degree-holders in the education sector.

367. On October 7, 2011, the President of the Republic made an Employment Policy statement expressing once again a commitment to offer a job to each Ivorian. To that end, the country drew up a National Employment Policy document which is now in the process of being validated. Moreover, the Government achieved a social truce on May 1, 2009. The Labor Code is currently being revised.

368. With regard to the component of State support for the integration of young degree-holders without qualification into formal employment by the private sector, AGEPE implements since 2009 a program for developing the competence of young persons through their placement in qualifying internships with private enterprises operating in growth industries, particularly telecommunications and agricultural product processing industries. The Recruitment Assistance Program (PAE) has recorded having secured 546 internship positions. In 2011, PAE made it possible to place 400 interns. The government’s financial effort in the framework of this program amounts to CFAF 200 million.

369. In order to build the national capacities for governance with respect to employment and the labor market, the government has since 2009, with the support of the development partners, reactivated the Services Framework by conferring to it the legal status of and association with an Administrative Board, so that in 2010 the entity in question became PFS CI. PFS CI is composed of AGEPE, AGEFOP, FDFP and FNS. Moreover, in the period, within the framework of its role, FNS granted a credit of the order of CFAF 980 million to 53 individual projects and 3 collective projects for the direct and indirect creation of 10,000 jobs.

Outlook

370. Côte d’Ivoire’s economic growth forecasts announce two-digit growth rates for the coming years. In that context, job creation for young persons is a central government priority. With the support of the development partners, the government hopes to create approximately 1 million jobs for that population group between 2011 and 2015. It will be appropriate to reactivate the Special Integration Programs rural young persons and women (PSIF/PIJR); and to implement projects for the unemployed in the framework of the Support for the Economic Treatment of Unemployment Project (PATEC), and special programs for job creation in the public sector.

371. In that connection, the Project for employment of the young, launched and funded by the World Bank in the amount of CFAF 25 billion envisages the creation of 30,000 jobs starting in 2012. The main employment areas will particularly relate to highly labor-intensive work (inter alia, maintenance of roads and service access facilities, neighborhood improvement, and garbage collection). This support must in addition contribute to the development of professional competences and provide a first work experience for young persons in economic growth sectors, enabling them to improve their employability and their opportunities for remunerated employment in the future.

372. Il is also envisaged to improve, in the period, the institutional and legal framework of the employment and labor sector, particularly through: (i) the adoption and dissemination of the National Employment Policy and its implementation; (ii) the finalization of the revision of the Labor Code with a view to its alignment with the relevant rules of the Organization for the Harmonization of Business Law in Africa (OHADA); and (iii) the revision of the inter-trade collective agreement.

Private Sector, Industry and SMEs

Commitments made for the period

373. The dynamism of the private sector is a key to the creation of wealth and economic stability. This sector, because of the crisis, suffered grave losses through the disorganization of existing enterprises and the weakening of their competitiveness. Accordingly, the business environment must be improved and supported by policies offering incentives for the promotion and diversification of private investment.

374. Specifically, the measurements in question will concern: (i) creating an attractive legal and institutional framework for the emergence of a dynamic private sector and a genuine fabric of SMEs; (ii) taking anti-corruption measurements, in particular against racketeering and various related problems, fraud and forgery; (iii) settling the domestic debt, especially with respect to the private sector; (iv) building of the capacities of SME professional organizations; and (v) reorganizing and upgrading the industrial enterprises.

Actions carried out

375. In the period, the private sector was helped through various activities. At the institutional level, a bill on the definition of SMEs was validated by all actors in 2011 and was transmitted to the government for adoption; a National Plan for good governance and combating corruption was drawn up in 2009 and is in the process of being updated; and the revision of the Investment Code of 1995, launched in 2010, was validated by the actors.

376. In the framework of the improvement of the business climate and of the competitiveness of enterprises, the government has placed special emphasis on the following measures: substantial reduction in the number of road blocks in 2011, which led to a 49 percent reduction of the time spent by users at the various stops. Since 2009, the Côte d’Ivoire is a member of the Road Fluidity Observatory in the framework of a USAID program with the Chamber of Commerce and Industry as focal point. A business formalities facilitation center, whose establishment began in 2010, is in the finalization stage.

377. Moreover, Ivorian enterprises benefit under a WAEMU restructuring and upgrading program (PNRM) since 2009. Between 2010 and 2011, the “AMADE-Pro invest” project, managed by CEPICI, made it possible to build the capacities of intermediary organizations offering support for the private sector.

378. A number of activities have been undertaken in order to revitalize the private sector. The consist of: (i) capacity building in 2011 for Approved Management Centers, with European Union funding; (ii) measures taken through tax regulations in support of enterprises in 2010 and 2012; (iii) debt settlements in the case of 41 SMEs within the framework of the Program of Support for the Revitalization of SMEs in a total amount of CFAF 1,474 million; and (iv) organization in 2011of a national day of SMEs in order to strengthen the dialogue between the State and the private sector.

379. In 2011, Côte d’Ivoire was declared eligible for the United Sates AGOA program. The country is making efforts to obtain the customs visa in order to offer Ivorian products an effective access to the United States market. At the end of December 2011, the domestic debt, which amounted to CFAF 3,570.8 billion, was reduced to CFAF 2,577.1 billion, and thereby State arrears to the private sector were reduced to CFAF 296.8 billion.

Outlook

380. In the future, State activities must relate to: (i) improving the competitiveness of enterprises; (ii) financing the activities of SMEs, particularly through the effective establishment of guarantee, investment and refinancing funds; (iii) strengthening the institutional and legal framework; (iv) reorganizing the technical and financial mechanisms of support for the private sector; and (v) reinforcing the dialogue between the State and the private sector.

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs)

Commitments made for the period

381. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) represent one of the main pillars of the economic emergence to which Côte d’Ivoire aspires. Accordingly, the State began to support their development and accessibility as a means of sustainable development for the population and for the PMEs throughout the national territory. In particular, the aim is to: (i) reduce the costs of services and equipment in order to facilitate access for a greater number of persons to ICT services; (ii) develop infrastructure and support for telecommunications; (iii) establish a legal and regulatory framework adapted to the needs of the sector; (iv) build the capacities of the actors.

Actions taken

382. In order to support the emergence of ICTs and ensure their accessibility to the population as and the SMEs throughout the national territory, reforms were launched in that sector. These reforms involve the incorporation of Community provisions into the national legislation in order to ensure alignment with the legal provisions of ECOWAS and WAEMU. In order to combat cyber-crime effectively and preserve the assets of the population and the enterprises and reassure the investors, the State created in 2009 a unit against cyber-crime (CERT). The government also launched in 2010 the preparation of an updated Telecommunications-ICT Code and adopted in December 2011 a decree on the identification of mobile telephony and Internet subscribers. In order to revitalize mobile telephony and encourage the entry of new investors, a decree was signed in December 2011 on the issuance of third generation mobile telephony licenses.

383. In order to reduce the costs of telecommunications and to facilitate the access of a greater number of persons to ICT services, the State has supported full liberalization of the sector, in 2004, and has granted seven mobile telephone service operator licenses. To achieve the goals of universal service and access, the State undertook the development of a national strategy for electronic governance, which was finalized in 2011. This program will eventually make it possible to connect various disadvantaged areas which are remote and economically not viable for private investment in the domestic telecommunications network.

384. With regard to activities undertaken to develop the telecommunications infrastructure and equipment, the government launched in 2009 a restructuring plan of the Post Office, the progressive reopening of six post offices in the former CNO zones, the rehabilitation and re-equipping of the former Higher African Institute of the Post and Telecommunications (ISAPT), and the activities of the Pan-African project of online services, which consists in the introduction of tele-medicine, E-education and diplomatic communications. The efforts continued in 2010 and 2011 through the payment of part of the debt of the Post Office, the drawing up of a decree on the creation of the African University of Information Technologies and Communication to replace ISAPT, the reorganization of the telecommunications/ICT infrastructure on a mutual-benefit basis, and the development of the national strategy for electronic governance.

385. Moreover, the following projects are in the process of implementation: (i) a government Intranet; (ii) the optic fiber connection between Abidjan and Bouna, an integral part of the nation’s backbone; (iii) the Pan-African project for online services, (iv) the national strategy for electronic governance; (v) the updating of the national ICT master plan; and (vi) the national strategy for E-education, E-health and E-agriculture.

Analysis of results and performance

386. The emergence of mobile telephony has favored the appearance of new services, particularly electronic transactions (inter alia, e-banking, credit purchases and transfers of funds). Mobile telephony, which dominates the telecommunications/ICT sector with more than 80 percent of turnover, was exploited in 2011 by five operators. In June 2011, statistics on subscribers were as follows: (i) Effective penetration of approximately 33 percent of the population, namely approximately 7 million users, given that these users have on the average 1.5 SIM cards; (ii) Constantly rising contribution of the telecommunications industry to GDP, estimated at approximately 6 percent in recent years; (iii) 85 percent coverage of the population by certain operators, with the possibility of 100 percent coverage in the next five years.

387. The mobile telephony sector generated 2,433 direct jobs in 2009 through investment amounting to CFAF 128 billion. In the same year, the total density of the sector was 71 percent. In 2009, the contribution of the sector to GDP was 5 percent.

388. Access to Internet is in increasing, with 9 operators in action and a penetration rate which increased from 1.8 percent in 2007 to 2.6 percent in 2010.

Outlook

389. Tele-density related to Internet and land telephone lines remains quite low, at an average of 3 users per 100 inhabitants. That is why significant efforts must be made for financing ICT sector development projects. In fact, ICT development in the country is connected with meeting such major challenges as: (i) building the broadband infrastructure; (ii) adapting the legal and regulatory framework for the ICT sector; (iii) development the services and the contents concerned; and (iv) reducing the costs of access terminals and of communications.

390. The Ministry of the Post Office and ICTs initiated the opening of the mobile telephony market to 3G, launched a combat against cyber-crime, began the construction of a national optic fiber infrastructure, and started the implementation of electronic governance (use of ICTs in the administration, in education and in all the fields of economic activity). In June 2012, two new optic fibers (ACE and WACS) will be introduced for international broadband connectivity.

391. As part of such dynamic developments, the State considers revitalizing the activities of the free zone of biotechnology and information technologies (VITIB), strengthening the Internet exchange point (CI-IPX), and establish a model for interconnection calculations.

392. In order to strengthen the security of electronic transactions, persons and goods, the State has launched a process for the full identification of mobile telephony and Internet subscribers; and plans to establish a single emergency number and strengthen the Center of Response to Data-Processing Incidents (CI-CERT).

Chapter 3: Improving Social Welfare For All

Education

Pre-school, primary and secondary education

Commitments made for the period

393. The State undertook to facilitate access to education for all and to improve the performance of the education system over the 2009-2013 period. Specifically, it committed to improve the quality and performance of the teaching staff, to increase access to school and to undertake institutional reforms.

Actions taken

In pre-school and primary education

394. As regards institutional reforms, the Government undertook to reinstate school uniform as of the start of the 2011-2012 school year. This reform should reduce economic and social discrimination in the post-crisis environment and will help identify pupils for security purposes. The Government also reaffirmed its will to continue with the policy of public primary education free of charge. Other texts and measures were introduced concerning: (i) the demolition of huts and old constructions around the school establishments to clean up the school environment; and (ii) online pupil enrolments and re-enrolments to combat parallel recruitment and properly control pupil numbers.

395. In the area of increasing accessibility to school, actions generally concerned the construction and renovation of public schools. For example, 4,478 classrooms were built nationwide for 223,900 pupils to attend school over the period.

396. As regards the renovations, particular emphasis was placed on the former Centre North and West (CNO) zones. In total, 873 primary classes and 47 pre-school classes were renovated by projects financed by the AfDB and the Japanese Government and implemented by UNICEF.

397. During the 2008-2009 to 2011-2012 school period, the Government distributed 6,880,600 mathematics, French, and Civic and Moral Education (ECM) textbooks, and 5,762,334 school kits enabling over 90 percent of the pupils enrolled in public primary educations to benefit from the free schooling policy. In addition, with the support of the United Nations System Agencies (UNS), it equipped 260 teaching centers for infants (JE) with mats and kits in the urban and rural areas of six regions and 75 primary schools with school furniture.

398. The Integrated Sustainability Program for School Cafeterias [Programme Intégré de Pérennisation des Cantines Scolaires – PIP/CS] was developed for the purpose of pupil retention in primary education. This program opened 5,046 operational school cafeterias with the support of the World Food Program (WFP) and the communities. The program distributed 5,057,98 metric tons of food for 1,353,112 primary and general secondary recipients and contributed to the de-worming of 1,522,182 pupils. In addition, over 800 retailers and transporters and 3,000 women organized around rural school cafeterias were trained. The State accompanied this process by disbursing the sum of 2 billion CFA francs to help the women’s cooperatives produce the food required for the children’s nutrition.

399. An evaluation was conducted of the Islamic denominational schools, which enabled 22 of the 43 targeted schools to join the official education system.

400. With a view to improving the quality and performance of the teaching staff, (i) 272 pre-school educators and staff were trained in basic notions of infant (JE) development and the use of infant kits and; (ii) 206 staff were trained in catering for nutritional requirements. Likewise, in terms of incorporating population development issues into the education system, the government, with the support of the UNFPA, conducted teacher capacity building actions (ENS-CAFOP) in 2009-2010. For example, two teaching guides including “Education in Family Life and Population” (EVF/EmP) were developed for nursery and primary schools. Capacity building was provided to 197 education players (educators and teachers) for the pilot phase of the programs readjusted in keeping with the Training By Skills (FPC) approach.

401. In addition, 4,067 new teachers were recruited from the voluntary workers, including 2,411 assistant primary school teachers and 1,142 ordinary primary school teachers. Furthermore, 102 principals were trained in the management of establishment projects and 60 voluntary community school teachers were trained in basic teaching skills. During this period, the Government, with the help of UNICEF and BAD financing, trained 4,345 volunteer primary teachers.

402. Psychosocial action took the form of information meetings, outreach and psychological consultations for some 50,000 pupils, teachers and staff who suffered trauma due to the post-election crisis. In addition, psychosocial modules were incorporated into the CAFOP program. In the same vein, a campaign was undertaken to get all the pupils and teachers back to school with the support of CLUSTER EDUCATION.

403. In the literacy sub-sector, eight (8) literacy centers were set up in Abengourou and Agnibilékrou and six (6) voluntary schools in Doropo and Bondoukou. In addition, kits were distributed to students in certain areas such as Abengourou, Agnibilékrou and Béttié.

In secondary education

404. In terms of increasing accessibility to secondary education, 32 junior high schools were built for a total of 96 new classrooms. Seven (7) establishments and 650 classrooms were renovated in Abidjan. In addition, the National School Fund (FNEC) carried out minor renovations and provided equipment to the modern high schools of Anyama, Port-Bouet and Bouaflé and equipped the Regional National Education Directorates (DRENs) of Dabou, Guiglo, and Abidjan 3 and 4 with computer equipment.

405. With a view to improving the quality and performance of the teaching staff, 514 high school and junior high school teachers were trained. In addition, the State, with the support of the Korean Government, equipped the Ministry of National Education with an Intranet system to network the different departments and some of its directorates such as the Directorate for Examinations and Competitive Examinations (DECO) and the Regional National Education Directorate (DREN) of Abidjan 1. This project cost a total of 1.2 billion CFA francs and gave the ministry 300 computers spread through the central and regional directorates. It is planned to eventually link the central level to all the regional and département directorates. This project has helped improve the education administration’s performance by ensuring the fluidity of communication and the circulation of information. Moreover, the Directorate for Examinations and Competitive Examinations (DECO) premises were renovated and equipped for a sum of 500,000,000 CFA francs.

Analysis of results/performance

406. The increase in the school establishments’ intake capacity from 2009 to 2011 helped improve access to education. In primary education, the gross enrolment ratio (GER) for the first year of primary school (CP1) rose from 73.4 percent in 2009, with 77.4 percent for boys and 69.3 percent for girls, to 75.3 percent in 2011. The gross attendance rate (GAR) rose from 76.2 percent in 2009, with 82.6 percent for boys and 69.4 percent for girls, to 82.7 percent in 2011. In junior general high school, the gross attendance rate (GAR) rose from 35.9 percent, with 43.2 percent for boys and 28.4 percent for girls, to 36.7 percent.

407. These rates remain low in the two levels of education as a whole. The low access and attendance rates are due not only to a still inadequate education supply, with dilapidated infrastructures unevenly spread through the country, but also to a low level of demand due to poverty among certain households.

408. Moreover, the year-end results used to assess the performance of the system remain alarming. Failure rates are high and erratic as shown by the table below. The primary completion rate remains unsatisfactory, having risen from 48.5 percent in 2009, with 55.7 percent for boys and 41.1 percent for girls, to 56.7 percent in 2011. The rate of repeated years remains high, having fallen from 18.8 percent to 16.8 percent in primary education and risen from 13 percent to 14 percent in secondary education over the same period.

Table 4Growth in examination pass rates
ExamsExam pass rate (percent)
2007-20082008-20092009-20102010-2011
CEPE (elementary school-leaving certificate)72.0974.5168.9058.22
BEPC (lower secondary school certificate)34.5823.3831.417.09
BACCALAUREAT26.8720.1224.5120.59

Chart 1.Growth in exam pass rates from 2008 to 2011

409. The reasons for these underperformances in recent years can be found in several types of problems identified by the evaluations conducted in 2009 and reported in the Education Country Status Report (RESEN). These concern mainly (i) poor access and teaching staff, (ii) the recurring crises in the sector, and (iii) fiscal constraints. Another reason is the problems experienced with implementing the Training By Skills (FPC) as a teaching approach.

410. The main brake on pupil access to the different levels of education remains the school infrastructure deficit. The infrastructures that do exist are in poor repair with obsolete equipment. Some have been destroyed by the different crises in Côte d’Ivoire over the last nearly ten years and particularly the post-election crisis. This has given rise to overcrowded classes with numbers reaching 100 pupils in certain cases.

411. On the point of fiscal constraints, the structural adjustment policies (SAPs) introduced starting in 1980 had a negative impact on the education/training sector’s financing. They prompted a decrease in the ratio of current public spending on education to total current spending from 36.6 percent in 1990/1991 to 32.5 percent in 1999/2000, or 6.9 percent of GDP in 1990 as opposed to 3.9 percent of GDP in 2000. From 2002 to 2006, the share of the budget allocated to education/training remained constant at 22 percent.

Outlook

412. The obvious observation in view of the above is that the education system’s performance is poor and its intake capacities are insufficient in general education. Steps should therefore be taken in the coming years, starting in 2012, to increase access and improve the quality and equity of the education services. The actions and measures to be taken are as follow:

413. To improve access to education in primary education and keep pupils in the education system, the Government will need to work with all the technical and financial partners renovate and build new classrooms and recruit new teachers. This policy should be flanked by the continuation of the policy to distribute school textbooks and kits free of charge, encourage parents to send young girls to school, build and renovate latrines, and supply schools with drinking water and electricity. The Government will need to put in place a pupil retention policy to reduce the rate of loss due mainly to dropouts and repeated years. It will also need to stimulate access to school and pupil retention by taking forward the Integrated Sustainability Program for School Cafeterias which, to extend its services to all pupils by 2015, will require adequate financing. To facilitate enrolment, the Government will need to take steps to improve the civil registration system.

414. In addition, the State needs to effectively introduce “bridge” classes to solve the problem of those excluded from the formal system, which has worsened since the September 2002 crisis, and it needs to make every effort to reduce the illiteracy rate. It will also need to work on the integration of Islamic schoolchildren by encouraging the promoters of these schools to adopt the official education program and also on the integration of community schoolchildren by revising the primary school catchment area criteria.

415. These efforts will need to be supported by scaling up the action to combat epidemics and the HIV/AIDS pandemic, which has a huge impact on young people and sexually active teenagers, but also on the training/employment sector teachers.

416. At general secondary school level, action will need to include retraining for teachers and administrative staff as well as the recruitment of new teachers for lower and upper secondary education to contain the flow of pupils by 2015. The State will also need to ensure a geographic balance for the establishments to be built. Moreover, the authorities will need to make every effort to facilitate the access of baccalauréat holders and equivalent to higher education by improve this sector’s supply and quality. Lastly, the State will need to provide for upgrading and special training for trainers and administrative and teaching staff in the National Education sub-sector.

417. At the State’s initiative, think tanks will need to be set up to define the conditions for the reopening or construction of boarding schools, without omitting the involvement of school partners, including the private sector.

418. In literacy and non-formal education, actions should be targeted with the consolidation of the literacy policy implementation framework and the extension of the functional literacy program.

419. Therefore, much remains to be done at sub-sector level to achieve the stated objectives in terms of improving access to and the quality of general education, and driving up literacy. The Ministry of National Education has undertaken a series of projects and programs to respect its promises as detailed above.

Scientific Research

Commitments made for the period

420. The scientific research commitments concern: (i) the promotion of scientific and technological research and; (ii) the dissemination and exploitation of the scientific and technological research results.

Actions taken

421. As regards the promotion of scientific and technological research, a draft multiyear scientific research and technological innovation policy bylaw has been submitted to the Government to fill the gap in this sector. Similarly, a draft decree has been drawn up on the establishment, remit, organization and running of the National Research Centre on the Oral Tradition (CNRTO).

422. In addition, a research building has been constructed at the National Agricultural Research Center [Centre National de Recherche Agronomique – CNRA]. The CNRA’s head office and premises in Zélé have been renovated (Man). The Grand-Lahou/CRO fish farm has been purchased and renovated. The Layo/CRO experimental station has been renovated. The IPCI has been fitted out with biomedical equipment.

423. With respect to the dissemination and exploitation of scientific and technologic research results, over the 2009-2011 period, 2.5 metric tons of basic selected rice seed was produced. A two-hectare lumberyard, nurseries containing 30,000 rubber tree seedlings and a ten-hectare rubber tree farmer field school were set up in Zélé. Three improved varieties of cassava were transferred to villages in Voungoué (Man).

Outlook

424. Arrangements will be made to: (i) pass the multiyear scientific research and technological innovation policy act; (ii) extend the research centers’ infrastructures (CRO, IPCI, CRE and LAMTO); (iii) conduct a study with a view to setting up three research incubator units; (iv) create observatories for geomagnetism, space weather and coastal oceanography; and (v) develop and implement the national research programs produced by the expertise clusters including the five presidential emergency programs (PPU).

Higher Education

Commitments made for the period

425. In higher education, the State undertook for the 2009-2013 period to: (i) foster access to higher education; (ii) improve the quality of the education provided and; (iii) improve governance.

Actions taken

426. To foster access to higher education, (i) the Ministry for Higher Education and Scientific Research (MESRS) was connected to the Internet and provided with computer equipment primarily by the PASEF project (Universities of Abobo Adjamé and Bouaké and the Central Directorates), (ii) the CROU-A, CROU-B and CROU halls of residence in Daloa were renovated and refitted, (iii) a development plan was drawn up for the University of Abobo-Adjamé, (iv) the University of Cocody, Bouaké, the ENS and the Houphouët Boigny National Polytechnic Institute [Institut National Polytechnique Houphouët Boigny – INP-HB] were partially renovated and refitted, (v) the Daloa and Korhogo URES and the former ESIE were renovated and refitted, (vi) ENSEA had an extension built, (vii) Côte d’Ivoire’s contributions to the financing of the inter-state schools of higher education (200 million CFA francs) were paid; and a partial settlement was made on a sum of 8.887 billion CFA francs due to the founders of private establishments and for the payment of grant arrears to students (2.5 billion CFA francs); and (viii) the State also contributed to the construction of the International University of Grand-Bassam.

427. With a view to improving the quality of higher education, the ministry undertook (i) the Human Resources Development Program (PVRH-II) – Higher Education Track; (ii) the special higher education renovation and equipment program/DGBF; (iii) the inter-university agricultural economics master’s program/CIRES; (iv) the recruitment of teachers by the National Higher Education Teacher Recruitment Commission (CNRES).

428. In addition, actions were taken to clean up private higher education with the closure of some 20 private higher education establishments and courses, and the establishment of an evaluation commission for private higher education establishments. A joint MESRS/Private Sector Commission was also set up to ensure consistency with the productive private sector (Steering Committee and Inspection Committee). A manual of procedures on holding exams for the vocational training certificate taken after the age of 18 (BTS) was drawn up and implemented.

429. With respect to improving governance, (i) several draft texts were put through to build up, restructure, clean up and organize higher education; (ii) the decree establishing the BMD system was signed and the three draft orders to organize the Bachelors, Masters and Doctorates were adopted; (iii) other draft decrees concerning the creation, remit, organization and running of the Daloa and Korhogo universities to replace the URES are being examined for adoption and signature; (iv) the draft decree on the creation, remit, organization and running of the Korhogo CROU formed by splitting off from the Bouaké CROU; and (v) as a pilot sector, the ministry’s MDTF was developed to improve the management framework in keeping with the WAEMU directives.

430. As regards actions in progress, under the University Decentralization Program, delineation and topographic survey work has been launched with a view to building universities in development hubs in Abidjan, Daloa, Bouaké, Man and San Pédro for a total of 38 million. The other actions in progress concern the renovation and fitting out of the Bouaké CROU-A halls of residence, the drafting of the development plan for the University of Cocody, the design of a renovation plan for the University of Cocody/UCA, the renovation and fitting out of the former ESIE/University of Cocody, Abobo Adjamé/UAA, University of Korhogo, the ENS, the Institut Pasteur and the renovation of the National Houphouët-Boigny Polytechnic Institute.

Analysis of results/performance

431. All of these actions should have helped the Ministry for Higher Education and Scientific Research to foster access to higher education, and improve the quality of the education and governance. However, the post-election crisis has wiped out all the efforts made. In addition, the renovation of the university infrastructures is at a virtual standstill for cash flow reasons.

Outlook

432. Steps need to be taken to (i) draw up a strategic plan for higher education with the support of the World Bank, (ii) introduce a university catchment area system for a high-performance higher education system adapted to the country’s sustainable development needs; and (iii) conduct a flow regulation policy to raise student numbers on the scientific courses. This measure will take the form of grants awarded to a large number of students on scientific courses, taking into account the gender aspects.

Technical and Vocational Training

Commitments made for the period

433. The commitments made can be summed up by three points: (i) improve the governance of the technical and vocational training sector; (ii) improve accessibility to technical and vocational training; and (iii) improve the quality of technical and vocational training.

Actions taken

434. The will to improve the governance of the sector took shape with numerous activities such as the development of the Strategic Reform Plan (PSR) for the Technical and Vocational Training Center (ETFP), production of the written instruments for the ETFP reform, adoption of the texts establishing the reform bodies (joint government/private sector committee, reform steering committee, and school-business partnership development unit), development of the sector’s Medium Term Development Framework for the 2009-1013 sector, and development of the sector’s 2011-2014 Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP).

435. In addition, there is the development of the ETFP’s technical and vocational training course catchment areas in its three phases: validation of the pilot technical and vocational training catchment areas including methodology and the criteria governing the location of the structures and establishments; drawing up the draft decree on the creation, remit and running of the ETFP Catchment Areas Commission; and setting up the ETFP Catchment Areas database. Moreover, CODIFOR conducted a study, with the support of the French Cooperation Agency, on structuring the professional sectors and an occupational skills register. Six other studies are programmed.

436. With respect to the will to improve access to technical and vocational education, the government, with the financial assistance of UNIDO, renovated the equipment for the Ferké 1 Vocational Training Centre converted into a technical college. The Ministry also renovated the Man technical college, and repaired the fencing for the Yopougon technical and business college, the Advanced Industrial Techniques Centre (CPTI) and the Advanced Printing Trades Center in Youpougon (CPMI). Renovation work was also carried out on the Grand Lahou and Cocody technical colleges as well as on the Ivorian Jewelry and Associated Trades School (EIBMA).

437. However, despite the need, very few buildings were constructed nationwide, aside from the opening of classes to study for a secretary’s certificate in Mankono and the construction and fitting out of a fisheries school in Bouaflé. This school was looted during the post-election crisis.

438. Other actions were taken in this sector: grants to pupils in technical and vocational education in Issia; apprenticeship and job opportunities assistance to disabled persons; supervision and control of demining in certain establishments; payment of all (liabilities) of the exam marking pay for 2010 and four-fifths of the exam marking pay for 2011; as well as the settlement of all the grants and expenses for 257 National Pedagogical Institute for Technical and Vocational Education [Institut Pédagogique National d’Enseignement Technique et Professionnel – IPNETP] trainees, and Côte d’Ivoire grants for 17,782 students. Lastly, the State paid part of the grants outside of Côte d’Ivoire for 418 students.

439. In a move to achieve the aim to improve the quality of technical and vocational training, the Ministry built the capacities of 100 school inspectors and provided building trade apprenticeships to 40 of 60 young people at the Implementation and Production Workshop (AAP) in Adzopé. In addition, with UNIDO’s support, trainers were trained on the basis of the Norwegian Donation to the tune of 590,400,000 CFA francs totally disbursed.

Analysis of results/performance

440. The results obtained still come in under the indicators and targets defined in the PRSP and the MDGs for 2015.

441. The rate of coverage is 257 students per 100,000 inhabitants. The sector’s ambition is to raise this rate to 309 students per 100,000 inhabitants.

442. In terms of quality, the ratio is 1 teacher for 8 to 12 students on the machines in the specialized classrooms, with the sector’s aim being a ratio of 1 teacher for 4 students for this period.

443. In terms of return, the average pass rate in the 2011 exams was 52 percent. The sector is now targeting a pass rate of approximately 80 percent.

444. On the financial side, the low execution rates (41 percent and 31 percent) for 2009-2010 are due mainly to the slow execution of the bidding documents (BDs). In addition, the bidding documents for co-financed projects take a huge amount of time to put together. The bidding documents were not put together and the co-financed projects were not executed. This state of affairs is related to the disruption caused by the sociopolitical crisis in Côte d’Ivoire.

Health

Commitments for the period

445. In health, the State undertook for the 2009-2013 period to: (i) improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the health system, (ii) improve the supply and quality of the healthcare services, and (iii) promote healthy individual and collective behavior.

Actions taken

446. In terms of improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the health system, the State conducted actions to build up the health system’s institutional framework. This led to the drafting of the national health policy document in 2011. A ministerial order was issued to set up a technical working party for the Campaign on Accelerated Reduction of Maternal Mortality (CARMMA), and a decree was issued to provide free healthcare in the public and community healthcare establishments. Moreover, the 2012-2016 National Health Development Plan and the MDG 5 Acceleration Framework are currently being drawn up.

447. At program level, the human resources mapping task was launched. Two national surveys are underway: the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS-CI III) and the Survey on the Availability, Quality and Use of Healthcare Services for Mothers and Children.

448. In the same vein, the Government conducted health system management framework building actions. In a move to reduce the personnel deficit, 1,653 staff were recruited in 2009, including the extraordinary recruitment of 700 paramedics. The breakdown of staff is as follows: 388 state-registered nurses, 296 state-registered midwives, 128 senior health technicians and 142 nurse’s aides.

449. In terms of improving the supply and quality of the healthcare services, the Government and foreign partners have renovated and refitted teaching hospitals, regional hospitals and a small number of general hospitals and health centers. The Gagnoa and Yamoussoukro regional hospitals, for example, were entirely renovated. In addition, some 50 ambulances were purchased, 36 of which are currently pending delivery.

450. These efforts also entailed the implementation of the Maputo roadmap to scale up the reduction in maternal mortality.

451. In 2009, the State attended to reducing Public Health Pharmacy (PSP) payment arrears, which stood at 7.066 billion CFA francs on 31 December 2009, including 2,833,535,436 CFA francs for 2008 arrears and 4.232 billion CFA francs for 2009 arrears. The payment efforts made by the Public Treasury totaled 8,138,445,446 CFA francs in 2009.

452. In 2010, in a move to improve the management of drugs and supplies, the State produced pharmaceutical sector management tools, trained health professionals in rational drugs management, and improved the drugs supply channels. The partners helped the Government to train four focal points (SPSR, DC-PNSR/PF, and PSP) in the information system for logistics management and CHANNEL. A round table on access to essential drugs held with the support of the WHO proposed ideas for solutions to guarantee the availability of drugs in the healthcare structures.

453. Since April 2011, the State has guaranteed treatment free of charge in the public and community healthcare establishments for a cost of 27 billion CFA francs. This sum has supplied the PSP with drugs and strategic supplies, paid the wages of healthcare staff in community-based establishments, and settled bills for treatment in all the pubic healthcare establishments.

454. In preventing and combating disease, a number of actions were taken in connection with the implementation of the priority health programs. For example, in 2010, four national polio vaccination campaigns were conducted, the fourth of which was restricted to 18 border districts in the West of Côte d’Ivoire. These campaigns were coupled with information meetings on medical audits of maternal deaths. In 2011, the second and third National Vaccination Days were held.

455. In addition, the cold chain was improved at all levels and vaccines were supplied. A Vitamin A supplement and de-worming campaign associated with the different vaccination campaigns reached 89 percent of the under-fives in the country.

456. Routine data from the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) show vaccination coverage rates in 2009 to be 94 percent for the BCG, 80 percent for Penta 3 (DPT-HepB-Hib), 76 percent for the oral polio vaccine (OPV3), and 66 percent for the measles vaccine. The EPI’s BCG and Penta 3 targets were met.

Chart 2.Growth in vaccination coverage rates

457. In preparation to prevent and combat disease, measles and yellow fever vaccination campaigns were organized with the assistance of the partners, as were vector control campaigns.

458. In malaria prevention, over 800,000 insecticide-treated mosquito nets were routinely distributed free of charge (EPI and antenatal clinics) in 2009. In 2011, a national campaign distributed 8,000,000 Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLINs). In addition, healthcare providers were given instruction in treating malaria in all the health districts.

459. The Government-United Nations System Partners cooperation conducted important actions with regard to the other health programs. The number of sites handling Buruli Ulcer was increased to 420. They screened 2,679 cases corresponding to 67.65 percent early diagnoses. In addition to this, 615 cases received surgical treatment. The government’s efforts also concerned the finalization of the National Center for Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology dossier and the dossier for the construction of the nuclear medicine unit. Note also the current refitting of the mobile emergency medical service with new dialysis equipment and the provision of supplies to treat kidney failure.

460. In reproductive health, in a move to make high-quality integrated sexual and reproductive healthcare services available and accessible, 47 maternity clinics and 16 operating rooms were entirely renovated and equipped with the assistance of the UNFPA from 2009 to 2010; and 178 healthcare structures were equipped with reproductive/family planning healthcare equipment and products. Moreover, 910 healthcare providers were trained in emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmOC) in addition to 616 midwives pending assignment; 42 healthcare providers were trained in the prevention and treatment of cervical and breast cancers. In family planning, a national pool of 26 trainers was set up in logistics management for reproductive healthcare products and 117 healthcare providers were trained in contraceptive technology and logistics management. In action to end obstetric fistula, two (2) new fistula treatment services were set up and equipped in Bouaké and Bondoukou, bringing up to four the number of health structures in the country able to operate to repair obstetric fistula. A total of 324 healthcare personnel (doctors, nurses and midwives) were trained in pre-, peri- and post-operative obstetric fistula care. A total of 680 women with fistula were operated on free of charge in the last three (3) years.

461. In 2011, the Ministry of Health and AIDS (MSLS) and the UNFPA launched a strategy to reorganize the reproductive healthcare services in 13 Département Health Directorates (DDS) and 68 healthcare structures. Accordingly, the capacities of 70 reorganization trainers and 50 healthcare providers were respectively built in management, standards, reproductive health/family planning procedures and EmOC. Fourteen renovated, equipped healthcare structures are now operational. A CAP study was conducted of community-based distribution of family planning in 68 healthcare structures. Furthermore, specific community mobilization activities were conducted to promote the use of the existing RH/FP services offered.

462. In addition, 281 healthcare and administrative managers and staff were trained up on the Minimum Initial Service Package for Reproductive Health. Reproductive health kits were pre-positioned and equipment delivered to the civil protection office.

463. With respect to the supply and demand of patient-friendly sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services for adolescents and youth, 75 peer educators were trained in the Lacs, Moyen Comoé and Nzi-Comoé regions in 2010. In addition, SRHAY information campaigns reached 28,494 young people.

464. Regarding the promotion of healthy individual and collective behavior, campaigns were conducted to promote food hygiene. These campaigns targeted mainly systematic hand washing, the use of glass-fronted cases for the sale of foodstuffs, and hygiene in eateries and restaurants. Information campaigns were conducted on personal hygiene and using latrines in a move to combat fecal content. Healthcare staff and hospital users were educated and trained in hospital hygiene. In addition, 10 pyrolytic incinerators were purchased for 10 health districts, and washbasins and latrines were built.

Analysis of results/performance

465. In terms of improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the health system, the health system’s institutional, regulatory and management framework was improved. The National Health Policy document defines the State’s priorities. Moreover, the new recruitments made have increased the staff ratios, which stood at one doctor per 5,695 inhabitants, one nurse per 2,331 inhabitants and one midwife per 3,717 women of childbearing age in 2009.

466. As regards improve the supply and quality of the healthcare services, the renovations, refitting and building work improved the national healthcare establishment coverage. In addition, the free healthcare measure raised the rate of frequentation of the public and community healthcare establishments.

467. Concerning drug availability, the efforts made by the Government reduced the rate of stock-outs in public healthcare establishments nationwide.

468. Despite reducing its debt, the Public Health Pharmacy’s situation continues to give cause for concern due to the loss of confidence among foreign suppliers, which demand payment in cash for drug orders.

469. In preventing and combating disease, the priority health programs have made some significant progress, especially those programs with considerable foreign financial assistance such as the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI), National Treatment Program for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS [Programme National de Prise en Charge des Personnes vivant avec le VIH/SIDA – PNPEC], the National Malaria Program (PNLP), the National Reproductive Health Program (PNSR), the National Buruli Ulcer Control Program (PNLUB), and the National Tuberculosis Program (PNLT).

470. In addition, the actions taken by the Government prevented measles outbreaks, controlled the yellow fever, dengue and cholera epidemics, and improved the quality of malaria control. However, the EPI is experiencing difficulties due to long stock-outs in certain vaccines.

471. Tuberculosis control made progress due to the increase in the number of treatment centers.

472. In reproductive health, maternal and newborn mortality rates were brought down by improvements to the infrastructures and technical capacities, healthcare provider capacity building, the availability of contraceptives from the Public Health Pharmacy (PSP), and treatment of vesico-vaginal fistula. This positive effect is also due to the increase in the delivery attendance rate, which rose from 66.72 percent in 2009 to 69.22 percent in 2011.

473. With respect to the promotion of healthy individual and collective behavior, the different information campaigns and other actions taken had an impact on individuals and communities by significantly improving practices. Nevertheless, a huge amount of work remains to be done.

Outlook

474. The main actions to be taken in the coming years to improve the populations’ state of health are: (i) improve the health systems institutional framework and management framework, (ii) improve the health sector’s financing and management of its financial resources, (iii) increase the supply of healthcare services, (iv) improve the availability and accessibility of good quality drugs and other strategic supplies, (v) improve the quality of healthcare services and the patient safety, (vi) build the capacities of the medical waste management and hospital-acquired infection control system, (vii) step up action to roll back malaria, tuberculosis, noncommunicable diseases and other pathologies (other healthcare projects and programs), (viii) improve maternal, newborn and child health as well as vaccination coverage for children aged 0 to 11 months and women of childbearing age.

HIV/AIDS

Commitments made for the period

475. The Government undertook to curb the current spread of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, to reverse the trend and to reduce its damaging effects on the populations, especially the poor. Specifically, the Government’s commitment focused on: (i) stepping up prevention, (ii) improving care for HIV-infected and HIV-affected people, and (iii) and improving the national decentralized, multisector coordination framework, the national monitoring and evaluation system, and national implementation capacities. Emphasis will be placed on the effective inclusion of HIV and gender in the local and national development plans in the different areas and activity sectors.

Actions taken

476. In terms of improving and extending HIV prevention services, actions were taken in 2010 with the assistance of the UNS to increase access to prevention services. For example, two studies were conducted: rapid evaluation of the incorporation of HIV and SRH into the healthcare services, and evaluation of the capacity building needs of HIV and Family Planning structures to guarantee high-quality HIV/Reproductive Health inclusion.

477. On the operational level, two HIV prevention and care structures were renovated and equipped and 26 peer educators were trained. Over 10,000 young people were informed about HIV or seen by the Counseling and Advice Centers and other structures set up for young people. In addition, the Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission (PMTCT) services were expanded with the number of sites rising from 48 to 112 in 2010. As regards improving HIV prevention among refugees, 82 community healthcare agents were trained in Reproductive Health (RH) and Gender-Based Violence (GBV) and 19 specialized monitors were trained in STI/HIV/AIDS. From 2009 to 2011, over 15 million condoms, including some 500,000 female condoms, were distributed with the help of the UNFPA.

478. In the prevention of mother-to-child transmission, a large number of HIV-infected pregnant women received antiretrovirals. At the same time, the number of sites offering Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission (PMTCT) services rose. A full 45 of the Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV sites became operational in 2010 with the assistance of the UNS. Community mobilization activities helped raise the use of PMTCT services.

479. With respect to improving the quality and accessibility of care for HIV-infected and HIV-affected people, actions taken concerned ramping up the institutional framework with the development of the National HIV ARV Drug Resistance Plan and National ARV Pharmacovigilance Plan; the adoption underway of the draft bill on protecting the rights of HIV-infected and HIV-affected people and including HIV in the Humanitarian Situation Contingency Plan.

480. In 2010, the needs of 2,035 orphans were addressed (education: 1,167; psychosocial: 1,994; legal with birth certificates: 611; medical: 287; economic support: 31; nutritional: 125, and apprenticeship: 66).

481. In terms of improving national leadership and governance in the coordination of HIV-AIDS actions, a g reat deal was done in 2009. At the political level, following the introduction of ARVs free of charge in 2008, a National Counseling and Testing Day (JNCD) was launched in 2009. The first edition held in June 2009 tested 12,693 people in the Abidjan District.

482. In 2010, with respect to the coordination and monitoring-evaluation of actions to curb HIV/AIDS, three additional HIV Technical Support Units for Local Initiatives (CTAIL) were set up and the capacities of the National Vulnerable Populations Program and these three CTAILs were built with the provision of vehicles and computer equipment. A sexual and reproductive health for youth platform was also set up with the youth networks and federations. Moreover, support was provided to nine regions to develop their regional plans. Two important studies were conducted. The first was the mid-term review of the strategic framework developed since 2006 and covering the 2006-2010 period and the Study on AIDS Resources and Expenditure (REDES) in Côte d’Ivoire.

483. On the programmatic level, actions were taken to provide access to antiretrovirals and set up sites for care and support. In addition to these actions, the 2010-2013 Joint Support Plan and the 2010 Work Plan were developed in 2010 for the harmonization and increased effectiveness of actions.

Analysis of results/performance

484. In terms of scaling up and extending the HIV prevention services, prevention of mother-to-child transmission is high on the agenda. The percentage of HIV-infected pregnant women receiving antiretrovirals to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission posted a sharp increase from 17.2 percent in 2007 to 42.3 in 2008 and 43.7 percent in 2009. These results reflect significant progress with the number of pregnant women joining the prevention of mother-to-child transmission scheme and the availability of care and support services in the PMTCT centers.

485. With respect to improving the quality and accessibility of care for HIV-infected and HIV-affected people, the number of children orphaned and made vulnerable by HIV and AIDS (OVC) who are given care and support is on the increase. It rose from 50,350 in 2007 to 95,480 in 2008 and 116,500 in 2009 (UNGASS, 2010). This increase is associated with the efforts of the national players and partners in support of this particularly vulnerable target. These results, which need to be consolidated, were obtained on the strength of the collaboration platforms strategy, a framework for sharing best practices among public, private and community players involved in the care and support of OVC.

486. As regards improving national leadership and governance in the coordination of HIV-AIDS actions, the significant actions taken made for a better promotion of testing among the populations. These actions also included an evaluation of the strategic tools and analysis of the financial flows for AIDS action from 2006 to 2008 and financing sources and destinations.

487. At programmatic level, interesting results were posted. The country’s antiretroviral access policy is encouraging from the point of view of the results obtained over the years. Moreover, the number of care and support sites grew from 215 in 2008 to some 400 in 2009.

Outlook

488. Government HIV/AIDS actions to be taken are: (i) scale up prevention of mother-to-child transmission actions; (ii) put at least 80 percent of eligible persons living with HIV/AIDS (adults and children) on ARV treatment; and (iii) provide treatment for the other infections and biological examinations for HIV-infected people. Moreover, the Government will attend to: (i) scaling up action to curb HIV/AIDS among young people and in schools; (ii) implement prevention actions for the general population and highly vulnerable populations (commercial sex workers, men who have sex with men, injectible drug users, persons in uniform, and detainees); (iii) supply the health centers with STI kits, BEA kits, supplies for testing, condoms (male and female), and behavior change communication (BCC) materials, (v) provide school, nutritional, medical and legal support to OVCs; and (vi) ramp up the national monitoring-evaluation system for HIV infection and care and support for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

Nutrition

Commitments made for the period

489. The State undertook to improve the nutritional state of the population, especially the most vulnerable groups, over the 2009-2013 period.

Actions taken

490. On the strategic level, the basic documents and management tools were developed for the NNP in 2009. Similarly, the strategic planning documents on establishing the National Food Security and Nutrition Program [Programme National de Sécurité Alimentaire et de Nutrition - PNSAN] and food security and nutrition experts at a high level (prime minister) were validated. In addition, the Ivoirian Food Safety Agency was set up. A response to the alarming situation in the north of Côte d’Ivoire (severe acute malnutrition) was also organized.

491. Furthermore, Nutritional Activities Promotions Week (SIAN) was held and institutionalized. Côte d’Ivoire held the 12th OOAS Nutrition Forum from 20 to 24 September 2010.

492. The Landscape Analysis assessed Côte d’Ivoire’s nutritional situation and also assessed the Infant and Young Child Feeding initiative (IYCF) policy, programs and practices.

493. On the operational level, the nutritional needs of children born of HIV-positive mothers were catered for. In the same vein, nutritional assistance and support was provided to HIV-infected and HIV-affected people. Care was provided free of charge to malnourished children.

494. The contribution to the nutritional needs of Orphaned and Vulnerable Children (OVC) and persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) took the form of 733 metric tons of food rations distributed and 5,098 OVC enrolled in the psychosocial support programs (with a total of 24,490 beneficiaries), along with 897 metric tons of food rations distributed to 5,989 PLHIVs and pregnant and breastfeeding mothers enrolled in the ARV treatment programs (with 29,945 recipients) in 2010.

495. In 2011, assistance to the malnourished also took the form of 5,000 food kits provided to HIV-infected and HIV-affected people.

Analysis of results/performance

496. The nutritional actions conducted, especially by the National Nutrition Program, helped reduce maternal and infant-juvenile mortality by managing malnutrition and improving the management of the nutritional requirements of HIV-infected and HIV-affected people. In general, these actions helped improve the state of nutrition of women and children.

Outlook

497. In connection with the move to scale up action to reduce malnutrition, the State plans to urgently: (i) set up 1,600 Nutritional Units in health structures and welfare centers, (ii) organize Vitamin A and Iron supplement and De-worming campaigns twice a year, (iii) train/retrain 30,000 community-based health workers in de-worming and community-based management of malnutrition, (iv) equip the FARN malnutrition management structures with culinary demonstration kits, anthropometric equipment including BMI, and community tables, and (v) build up nutrition and nutritional security.

Promotion of Gender Equality

Commitments made for the period

498. The commitments focused on the creation of a national environment conducive to gender management in all the sectors of public and private life. These commitments were expressed in terms of: (i) institutional support for the promotion of gender equality, (ii) capacity building for national and local gender and development stakeholders, (iii) scaling up action to combat violence against women, (iv) support to empower women, and (v) increase in the participation of women in the political decision-making process.

Actions taken

499. With respect to institutional support for the promotion of gender equality, the National Policy on Gender Equity and Equality (PNEEG) was adopted and mainstreamed in 2009 with the distribution of 1,000 copies. The national strategy to prevent gender-based violence (GBV) is being finalized and the Persons and Family Code is still pending adoption by the Government. Other activities focused on scaling up the institutional process with 14 sector-based gender units and ramping up measures to combat sexual violence, especially with the translation, dissemination and publication of 500 copies of the National Plan for the implementation of Resolution 1325.

500. On the subject of R1325, the evaluation of its implementation action plan is underway. Moreover, a constructive work framework has been set up with ARSIP (religious alliance against AIDS and other pandemics) to combat GBV. In 2010, the operational framework was improved for the Female Training and Education Institutes (IFEF) with the issue of an order and the revision of the training curricula for the IFEF students to facilitate their socio-professional inclusion. The Additional Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on African women’s rights was ratified in September 2011, the Optional Protocol to CEDAW was ratified in October 2011, and the Maputo Protocol was also ratified. Côte d’Ivoire’s report on the implementation of the CEDAW was finalized and presented. In addition, a draft bill was drawn up to revise the Penal Code and the Code of Criminal Procedure. In 2010, the Ministry of the Economy launched the gender-sensitive budgeting process.

501. In terms of capacity building for national and local gender and development stakeholders, over 9,705 people (including 4,401 women and 5,304 men) were educated and trained in gender-based violence issues. Moreover, an information campaign on the prevention of protection against gender-based violence (GBV) reached 251,668 people in over 268 towns and 169,000 pupils. In addition, 18 platforms to combat GBV were set up and 360 players trained. In liaison with the humanitarian coordination system on GBV prevention and response, the manual on standard operational procedures for the system of referral and counter-referral for GBV was developed and disseminated by the platforms and humanitarian stakeholders. A religion and gender information guide was developed; 25 religious leaders. 61,030 people were familiarized with GBV; 58 GBV watch committees were set up and headed up by 234 people, 54 percent of whom are women; 30 journalists (16 women and 14 men) from ten radio stations were trained in handling GBV information. In 2010 and 2011, the Ministry of the Economy and Finance trained 80 managers in the government budgeting and budget execution departments in gender-sensitive budgeting.

502. Concerning institutional and legal support to combat violence against children, Côte d’Ivoire ratified a number of protocols on the protection of the child in 2011, namely the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict, the Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, the Palermo Protocol on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, and the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights on women’s rights. Moreover, a National Child Protection Coordination (CNPE) structure was created by Order No. 330 of 10 August 2011. The national child protection policy is also being developed, and a “Children in Distress” freephone number (116) is being finalized. Lastly, the fourth supervisory meeting on the cooperation agreement between Côte d’Ivoire and Mali to combat trafficking in children was held in Abidjan in October 2011.

503. In action to combat violence against children, 26 School Life Directorate (DVS) coordinators and 686 teachers/educators were trained up in the use of the SARA tool, and 169,000 pupils in 343 primary and secondary schools were familiarized with the risks of violence against children (F/G) at school and their corrective measures. Moreover, 14,246 people were informed and educated about GBV.

504. In scaling up action to combat violence against women, Center for victims of sexual violence [Centre de Prévention et d’Assistance aux victimes de violences sexuelles -PAVVIOS] was set up and equipped in Attécoubé in 2009. In addition, eight sexual violence watch committees were established in Attécoubé. In 2009-2011, the UNFPA drew on AfDB financing to assist the renovation and fitting out of ten welfare centers, medically treating 206 rape survivors, including 111 (54 percent) within 72 hours of the incident, and providing psychosocial care for 249 rape survivors and 120 FGM survivors. In addition, 83 rape survivors pressed charges. In a move to improve response measures, 73 national senior health workers and 25 welfare workers were trained in holistic management of GBV cases and 272 players on ten platforms were trained up on the directives, ethical principles, standard operating procedures, coordination and data collection.

Table 5Actions to combat GBV in 2011
ACTIVITIES (2011 Ministry for the Family, Women and Children - MFFE)2nd QUART3rd QUART4th QUARTTOTAL
Identification of victims of violence associated with the post-election crisis112317932161220775
Identification of structures to manage the victims of violence associated with the post-election crisis526967
Counseling, advice and psychosocial support60544451246633
Home visits/social surveys35301277
Assistance (legal and judicial)10091231
Medical assistance1611411244
Referral and counter-referral5887101246
Distribution of kits-031013
Stakeholder capacity building90138140368
Establishment of community-based interfaces (volunteers)265552133
Guidance to victims for psychological treatment3350114197
Workshop and representation471122
Information sessions/stand holding53917
Table 6Number of people handled by the PAVVIOS center for victims of sexual violence
2008200920102011
Number of cases20170907
AgeGirl 7-14 years Adult 24-27 yearsGirl 11-17 yearsGirl 10-19 yearsGirl 04-16 years
HIV infected1000
Death0000
Perpetrator sentenced3221

505. In terms of support for the empowerment of women, 12 female cassava grinders were granted cooperatives in Bouaké, Sakassou, Grand-Lahou and Diakro. At the same time, 101 applications for assistance were granted for a total sum of 90,911,550 CFA francs, 18,000,000 CFA francs of which was earmarked for income-generating activities and educational assistance and 62,911,550 CFA francs of which was earmarked for medical assistance. The AfDB and Japan project supported 229 groups of women for a total of 19,641 women. In addition, under the Women and Development Fund Project [Projet Fonds Femmes et Développement – PFFD], the Government provided 300,000,000 CFA francs to six microfinance institutions (MFIs) to grant very low interest-rate loans to female cooperatives.

506. In 2011, in a move to coordinate activities to combat GBV, 22 national GBV action capacity promoters were trained by the joint ECHO project (UNFPA, UNICEF and UNHCR). In addition, 40 Force Républicaine de Côte d’Ivoire (FRCI) officers and 82 FRCI NCOs were trained in international humanitarian rights, HIV/AIDS and guiding GBV principles. Women were provided capacity building to manage income-generating activities (IGAs). In this regard, 24 women from five groups and four MFFE officials were trained in micro-project management techniques in 2011. Moreover, 25 IFEF students were trained and are now operational in sewing machine maintenance and repairs and simplified cooperative management/accounting, and 40 others were set up in five dressmaking workshops under the youth program initiated by the UNDP. The IFEFs also benefited from building work, renovations and equipment: two IFEFs were renovated in Man and Sassandra, two are being built in Aboisso and San Pédro, two were fitted out in Sassandra and Tabou, and one is being fitted out in Soubré.

507. In terms of increasing the participation of women in the political decision-making process, the last government in 2010 only had five female ministers in a 36-member government (21 percent) and the 2011 government only had five female ministers out of 36 members (14 percent). A total of 105 women, or approximately 11 percent, stood in the 2011 general election as opposed to 3 percent in the 2001 general election. In the institutions of the Republic, one woman was appointed to the head of the Grand Chancellery in 2011. Moreover, the Government granted 105,000,000 CFA francs to women who stood in the December 2011 general election.

508. In addition, a compendium of female expertise was developed for use as a decision-making tool and has already registered 2,000 subscriptions.

Analysis of results/performance

509. Three indicators have been chosen to assess the progress made with the promotion of gender equity and equality. These are the girl-boy parity index in secondary education, the percentage of women in government, and the percentage of non-agricultural female wage-earners.

510. The parity index rose from 0.81 in 2009 to 0.83 in 2011. In higher education, the enrolment ratio stood at 35 percent of girls to 65 percent of boys, representing a gender ratio of 0.54.

511. The percentage of women in government fell 7 points. There was a lack of data to be able to report on the percentage of non-agricultural female wage-earners at the time of writing. However, in 2005, just 12.71 percent of modern jobs were held by women.

512. Despite the rise in female participation in public life, gender and parity promotion efforts still fall far short of the target of 30 percent representativeness. The above shows that the promotion of gender equality is still faced with the persistence of inequalities between men and women in society.

Outlook

513. The State intends to concentrate its gender and equality promotion actions mainly in: (i) training national stakeholders in gender issues, (ii) building the technical and operational capacities and economic empowerment of women to foster their participation in public life and in the decision-making bodies, (iii) improve the psychosocial, medical and economic handling of GBV victims, and (iv) scale up actions to promote the rights of women and children.

Safe Water

Commitments undertaken during the period

514. Regarding access to drinking water, the government has undertaken to guarantee the access of the people to safe water and to increase the percentage of the population with access to a source of drinking water from 64.8 percent in 2008 to 82.5 percent in 2015. These commitments concern pursuit of the social policy on drinking water, optimal management of the sector, and satisfaction of the drinking water needs of population groups in urban, rural, and suburban areas.

Actions taken

515. In the context of optimal management of the sector, in 2009 the government held the General Assembly on Drinking Water (EGEP), one of whose main findings related to the issuance, at the institutional and regulatory levels, of decrees in implementation of the laws on the Water and Environment Code, so as to establish, among other things, the tasks of the principal stakeholders in the sector and create, as soon as possible, an autonomous regulator. A legal and institutional framework was also put into place for the professionalization of rural and suburban hydraulic management, with a view to ensuring the durability of drinking water installations and the continuity of this public service in rural and suburban areas. The professionalization of the management and operations of rural hydraulic structures (HV and HVA) entered its active, operational phase as of 2009. Accordingly, during the period 2009–11, seven economic operators were installed in the Boundiali, Ferké, Odienné, Man, Tiassalé, Jacqueville, and Aboisso districts in the context of the AEP KfW VIII-HVA project, and five other economic operators were selected and are being installed in the Bafing, Denguélé, Worodougou, and Bas-Sassandra regions in the context of the EU-financed PUR 4 project.

516. Also, on the basis of Decision 0025/MIE-CAB of March 8, 2007 organizing the supply of standpipe-borne drinking water to population groups, the ONEP established a pricing plan for the professionalization operation, with a view to ensuring a drinking water supply to the poor segments of the population, in light of their living conditions and purchasing power. This new pricing plan, supported by sensitization and communication actions, made it possible to professionalize the management of 28 standpipes in Bouaké, with the installation of economic operators or target groups and the opening of a bank account for the centralization and safety of funds generated by water sales. In addition, the Contract-Plan concluded between the government and the ONEP as well as the study on delimitation of the protective perimeters around surface reservoirs for the AEPs in the towns of Daloa, Gagnoa, and Adzopé are being finalized, as are the analytical studies on the drinking water networks in the town of Abidjan, Bouaké, and Korhogo, and the inventory of the Western Banco, Northern Niangon, Northern Riviera, and Anonkoua-Kouté wellfields. In 2011, the CNGPEV was created to help rural communities manage the hydraulic structures, with greater empowerment of women.

517. As regards the pursuit of the social policy on drinking water, in 2010 the ONEP introduced professionalization in suburban areas, so as to provide for underprivileged population groups an efficient solution to the drinking water supply problems in their areas of residence. Between 2009 and 2011, 114 new standpipes were thus installed throughout the country, including 61 in the town of Abidjan and 44 others in the Bas-Sassandra, Lacs, Denguélé, Bafing, Vallée du Bandama, Savanes, and Worodougou regions. These achievements raised the number of structures from 39 in 2008 to 144 in 2011, that is, by 270 percent. Similarly, 30 standpipes were commissioned and are functional in Bouaké; these will facilitate the provision of supplies to 6 300 persons in nine neighborhoods of the Bouaké commune and one neighborhood of the Djébonoua commune. In addition, several low-cost connections were established for over 30,000 inhabitants of the Bardot de San Pedro shantytown, using European Union financing. Also, 58 health centers were linked to the drinking water distribution network. To combat water-borne diseases, the authorities distributed 2,000 kits for quick water quality tests.

518. As part of the same thrust, the NGO IRC provided water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) assistance to villages numbering 20 in Biankouma, 20 in Mankono, 20 in Séguéla, and 30 in Bangolo. It also chlorinated two wells and distributed 7,270 purification tablets for 36,350 liters of water in the Nahibly camp for internally displaced persons in 2011. In addition, the NGO OXFAM distributed WASH kits to 6,125 households in the Bloléquin district during the period 2009–11.

519. To meet the drinking water needs of the people in urban, suburban, and rural areas, the sector received its own funds (FNE, FDE) as well as support from the public treasury and the development partners.

520. Accordingly, in rural areas, between 2009 and 2010, 1,112 HMP-fitted wells were drilled, out of a forecast of 4,500; 577 HMPs were repaired out of the 4,500 out of service; 42 HVA systems were set up and commissioned, including 30 in the former CNO zone; and 10 HVA systems were repaired. In 2011 and following the post-electoral crisis that worsened the infrastructural deterioration, the government initiated the Presidential Emergency Program (PPU), whose first phase led to the repair, as at December 31, 2011, of 1,732 HMPs out of the planned 2,500 and of one HVA system out of seven. In this same context, the water production, treatment, and distribution facilities are being enhanced in 43 areas. In addition, UNICEF and its partners for the WASH project, CERF 2 (Danish Council for Refugees, SOLIDARITES, CARITAS, Association in Support of Urban Sanitation Self-Promotion), conducted a diagnostic study on the breakdown of 200 manual pumps and reactivated 100 water point management committees for the supply of water to 102,000 returnees in the Moyen Cavally region. Also, the UNDP funded repairs to 200 other broken-down HMPs in the Zanzan region.

Table 7Geographic Breakdown of the Hydraulic Infrastructures Installed or Repaired During the Period 2009-2011
RegionConstructionRepair
HVHVAStandpipesHVHVA
AGNEBY-51
BAFING30147
BAS-SASSANDRA1106382
DENGUELE399353
FROMAGER39
HAUT SASSANDRA21301
LACS3072031
LAGUNES42702
MARAHOUE102
MONTAGNES208161
MOYEN CAVALLY2376
MOYEN COMOE731021
N’ZI COMOE10911811
SAVANES3121210379
SUD BANDAMA51
SUD COMOE10391
VALLEE DU BANDAMA1057463583
WORODOUGOU55351741
ZANZAN30281
TOTAL1,112421442,50911
Source: ONEP, 2011
Source: ONEP, 2011

521. In urban areas, government actions, with support from the development partners, concern the upgrading of 10 water treatment stations in Abidjan and in 10 large inland towns; the expansion of the network of service mains over more than 15 km and the Yamoussoukro, Ferké, Gagnoa, Abatta, Boudépé, and Bayota drinking water supply (AEP), as well as the completion of the DJIBI project and the drilling of two wells in Cocody and Yopougon for a production of 30,000 m3/day out of a need for 150,000 m3/day. In addition, AEP outfitting work is under way, in particular on five 30-50 m3 water towers for storage and abstraction (drilling) in four semi-urban areas of the Bouaflé, Odienné, Ferké, and Tengréla districts. Work is also ongoing on 18 projects to enhance the drinking water supply and on the Sud-Comoé groundwater project to increase the drinking water supply in Abidjan.

Analysis of results/performance

522. As regards the construction and upgrading of wells fitted with manually-operated pumps, the actions taken were of benefit to some 780,000 persons.

523. Those actions helped raise the rate of coverage of the HMPs from 73 percent in 2008 to 77 percent in 2011, with 16,665 water points in use, and reduce the outage rate from 54 percent to about 39 percent at end-2011.

524. The new HVAs established during the period 2009–11 totaled 42 out of the 390 envisaged–that is, an implementation rate of only 9.5 percent. However, the actions taken in this regard led to an increase in the number of systems, from 201 in 2008 to 243 in 2011, supplying a total of nearly 255 areas; this corresponds to 13 percent of national coverage.

525. Connections to the drinking water distribution network were established at 58 health centers out of a total of 300 planned for the period.

526. Because of all the actions performed, the drinking water supply rate rose from 61 percent in 2008 to about 65.9 percent in 2011 at the national level (with 79 percent in urban areas and 53.1 percent in rural areas), against 74.2 percent targeted for achievement of the MDGs in 2015.

Outlook

527. The drinking water sector still faces enormous problems despite the efforts made by the government and its partners. To address those problems, the authorities will intervene in 2012 primarily by issuing laws and regulations on the organization and sharing of roles among state stakeholders in the sector; building the respective human, technical, and financial capacities of all those stakeholders; and ensuring the safety and preservation of water resources, the continuity of the water supply, and the development of the asset.

528. The security and preservation of the water resources involve: (i) strengthening the network for monitoring the water tables of the mainland port (Abidjan) and the Sud-Comoé (Bonoua) areas; (ii) installing observation stations in the reservoirs (dams); (iii) assessing water resource pollution levels in the towns of Abidjan, Bouaké, Korhogo, and Daloa; and (iv) initiating forward-looking studies on water transfers to undersupplied areas.

529. Actions to ensure the continuity of the water supply entail: (i) increasing production and the distribution networks in 20 undersupplied centers; (ii) repairing defective facilities, involving 40 production centers, 17 HVA systems, 11 suburban standpipes, and about 1,000 HMPs; and (iii) completing the upgrading of 601 HMPs, six HVA systems, and structures in 43 urban areas.

530. In the context of the development of the asset, the actions to be taken are: (i) building treatment stations in Abidjan, Jacqueville, Dabou, Aboisso, and Ayamé; and (ii) establishing 58 HMP-fitted wells and 15 new HVA systems. In addition, the second phase of the PPU will lead to the enhancement of 11 production centers, the renovation of 15 other HVA systems and 4,000 HMPs, as well as the construction of 74 standpipes in poor city and suburban neighborhoods.

531. In addition, 30,000 subsidized connections and 350 standpipes will be installed for low-income households, and 100 health centers and 100 schools will be connected to the drinking water distribution network.

532. All these actions programmed for 2012 may improve the service rate to about 67.5 percent (with 81 percent for urban areas and 54 percent for rural areas), against 74.2 percent targeted for achievement of the MDGs, and cause a significant reduction in the HMP outage rate, from 39 percent to 9 percent.

Environment, Sanitation, Housing, and Living Conditions

Environment

Commitments undertaken during the period

533. The sector’s objective is to improve the environmental conditions and preserve the natural resources. With this in mind, the government undertook to build capacities in the forestry sector, streamline water resource management, ensure the sustainable management of domestic and industrial waste, preserve biodiversity, and roll out an environmental watch system for the monitoring of air, water, and soil quality.

Actions taken

534. The efforts made by the government with the support of its partners have concerned sustainable management of the forests and wildlife, sound water resource management, sustainable domestic and industrial waste management, biodiversity preservation, and the roll-out of an environmental watch system expected to facilitate the monitoring of air, water, and soil quality.

535. For sustainable management of the forestry and wildlife resources, the legal and regulatory framework and the tools for managing the forestry and wildlife resources were enhanced. The forestry policy paper, the outline of the model plan for the organization of classified forests, the manual of Principles, Criteria, and Indicators (PCI) of classified forests, the simplified plan for developing the perimeters of logging, and the draft interministerial decree identifying and tracing the legal origins of the forestry products distributed throughout the national territory were thus formulated. Similarly, the study was conducted on capacity building for the rural stakeholders in reforestation, and the preliminary draft of the law establishing the Forestry Code and repealing Law 65-425 of December 20, 1965 was prepared.

536. Also noteworthy is the preparation of the analytical study on sustainable development and the pertinent national strategy, the national policy paper on the environment and sustainable development and the strategic action plan for its implementation, and the risk management and disaster reduction (RRC) national strategy and the strategic action plan for its implementation. A decree was drafted on the creation, organization, and operation of the risk reduction and disaster management national platform. Similarly, a guide was compiled to raise awareness about disaster risk reduction.

537. The study was performed on the creation of the Forestry Development Fund. However, a complementary study on the review of forestry taxation and the study on establishment of the National Agency for the Development of Forests in Rural Areas (ANDEFOR) are under way.

538. Interventions for sustainable forest management have also involved the reforesting of 14,209 hectares, consisting of 4,052 ha in rural areas and 10,157 ha in classified forests. This surface area represents only 0.73 percent of the 1,934,780 ha to be reforested for achievement of the MDGs in 2015. In addition, maintenance was performed on 5,649 ha of reforested areas, and 1,369 ha of matured teak were pruned. For reforestation purposes, 1,154,000 forest plants were produced in preparation for meeting the needs in the context of the Tree Symposium and for financial year 2012. Also, 70 village committees consisting of riverside residents were established to help manage the classified forests, and income-generating activities (IGA) to benefit the riverside communities in Taï National Park were funded. The upgrading of tourism infrastructure in the context of the program financed by the UNDP, with support from the OIPR, the Swiss Center, and the WCF, helped consolidate the process of protecting this park, with a 7 percent reduction in the index of illegal human activity. There were 519 surveillance and control patrols against forest clearing and any other unlawful act taking place in the classified forests and in the parks and reserves.

539. Campaigns were waged to raise awareness of the need for a clean environment, for the development of eco-citizen reflexes, and for action against bush fires, among the people of the center-west, north-east, center-east, and south. Some 50 national stakeholders on the risk- and disaster-management platform were also trained.

540. To make Ivorian forestry products more competitive on the international market, a campaign to raise the awareness of 492 stakeholders involved in the sustainable management of forests was waged in Abidjan, Bondoukou, Bouaké, and Korhogo as part of the ACP-FLEGT-FAO project related to the implementation of forestry regulations, governance, and trade. Côte d’Ivoire is currently assuming ownership of this process. The Taï, Marahoué, and Comoé national parks were identified as pilot sites for activities of the program to monitor the illegal killing of elephants in Côte d’Ivoire.

541. In the area of water resources, papers and studies were prepared. For instance, the national policy on integrated water resource management (GIRE) was formulated, and three studies were done on marine areas, the consensual and coherent GIRE institutional framework, and the GIRE funding mechanism.

542. Given the satisfactory results of phase 1 of the Niger-HYCOS project, the Côte d’Ivoire government and the Niger Basin Authority (ABN) signed an agreement in July 2011 for the implementation of phase 2. Aimed at collecting data on water heights and flows in the Niger Basin, this project led, in its first phase, to the installation of two data-collection platforms in Kouto and Samatiguila and to the procurement of technical hardware.

543. Analyses of Ebrié Lagoon and the water tables in the Abobo, Duékoué, Yopougon, Toulepleu, and Bloléquin areas, which were combat zones during the post-electoral crisis, were undertaken to warn people of the pollution risks. The updated plan to clean up Cocody Bay was adopted by the interministerial committee; the aquatic plants in Banco Bay and Grand Bassam Lake were cleaned up.

544. Within the framework of the sustainable management of domestic and industrial waste, a national plan for urban health and a national policy paper on combating nuisances were compiled. Similarly, a national plan for the management of dangerous waste was validated, and the capacity of the Autonomous Port of Abidjan for dealing with dangerous waste was assessed. The study on waste characterization and valuation is partly complete, as are the compilation and validation of the guide to managing the household and comparable waste of communes with less than 50,000 inhabitants, which is expected to facilitate a communal, participative, normative, and optimal assumption of responsibility for this waste. As regards trash collection and quality of life improvement, the government implemented several projects with support from the World Bank in the PUIUR context. For instance, the “clean town” operation was used to organize spaces for the grouping of household garbage and to clean up the Abidjan district of dumped garbage, estimated to weigh 504,000 metric tons in 2009. Similarly, the “clean country” operation, initiated following the post-electoral crisis, helped eliminate the main dumping grounds in the districts of Abidjan, Yamoussoukro, and areas such as Grand-Bassam, Toumodi, Tiassalé, N’Douci, N’Zianouan, Daoukro, Daloa, and Man. This operation also served as an opportunity to scour gutters, clean the facades of some public buildings, embellish the principal roadways and public spaces, and provide cleanliness kits to 37 communes for operations to collect household garbage. All these activities were supported by sensitization of the people to the need for behavioral changes, through awareness campaigns.

545. The second phase of the “clean country” operation, launched since August 2011, includes a “clean towns” component involving 126 communes of the country’s hinterland, the expansion of the operations to remove people occupying public spaces in all the neighborhoods of the Abidjan district, and further embellishment of public spaces.

546. To make urban cleanliness sustainable and to combat illicit occupation as well as the return of those removed and nuisances, the urban health unit was reactivated with a view to inculcating in people the behavior of eco-citizens.

547. Tender documents are being prepared for the upgrading of the Akouédo garbage dump, on which work is expected to begin in the first quarter of 2013. The bidding procedure is under way for concession, as of January 2012, of the public service of pre-collection, collection, and valuation of solid waste and the burial of the ultimate waste of the Abidjan district.

548. To protect people against the risks of deterioration of the quality of the air, water, and soil and to preserve biodiversity, seven Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) sectoral guides, covering agriculture, energy, mining and quarrying, water supply and sanitation, roads, industry, and transportation, are available to promoters and consultancy firms. Moreover, enterprises in the Koumassi industrial zone were sensitized to the existing environmental legislation, and shippers were trained with a view to the formulation of a program designed to ensure smooth traffic flows and the reduction of pollution from vehicles and motorized engines. Similarly, operators in the areas of cold energy, the Ivorian customs, and the ministry of commerce were trained and equipped in the context of the elimination of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) for protection of the ozone layer. The partners and stakeholders in the Clean Development Mechanism (MDP) were sensitized and trained in the use of carbon markets as trading platforms to attract investors and reduce atmospheric pollution.

549. The combined efforts of the government and its partners helped create better government, civil society, and local community ownership of the problems of biotechnologies, climate change, and natural risks. About 100 parliamentarians were thus trained for a better grasp of the impact of climate change and consideration of these problems in policies and regulations. The capacity of civil society and private sector organizations was strengthened for dealing with the impacts of climate change on biodiversity, agriculture, water resources, coastal erosion, and socio-economic and human development. In addition, the diagnostic report was compiled concerning the impacts of climate change on sustainable development in Grand-Lahou, and adjustment and mitigation measures were formulated in light of climate change. National stakeholders were sensitized to the dangers of using plastic bags and the threats of biodiversity deterioration.

550. For successful implementation of the tasks assigned to national stakeholders, the government and its development partners made it a priority to build the technical and material capacities of those responsible for the environmental, water, and forestry sectors. Accordingly, 60 staff members of the ministry of environment, water, and forests were trained in: (i) the process of planning, programming, and budgeting; (ii) certification, traceability, and sustainable management; and (iii) performance-oriented monitoring and assessment. Moreover, the ministry purchased four micro-computers, three printers, a video projector, a scanner, and a four-wheel-drive vehicle, and the CIAPOL laboratory was fitted out with appropriate hardware meeting international standards. The building of the regional directorate of water and forests in Man was upgraded, and those of the regional directorates in Bouaké, Odienné, and Korhogo are being improved. Finally, professional staff in the ministry of environment and sustainable development and in the ministry of health and the fight against AIDS participated, in Luanda in November 2010, in the 2nd interministerial conference on health and the environment in Africa.

Analysis of results/performance

551. The impact of the activities and projects undertaken in the sector of the environment, water, and forests on population groups is generally perceived only over the long term. Moreover, given the lack of recent statistical data, a more detailed analysis cannot be done of the positive changes generated by the actions taken. However, the observation of a few indicators support the view that the combined efforts of the government and its partners helped improve environmental conditions and preserve the natural resources in question. Although data are unavailable on the proportion of forested areas involved, the results of the pursuit of reforestation activities (14,209 ha of forest replanted between 2009 and 2011) thus remain extremely negligible when compared with the 2015 forest coverage target of 1,934,780 ha (6 percent). This low implementation rate can be attributed to the inadequacy of financing for reforestation activities, on the one hand, and to problems of purchasing land for forestation from the people, on the other hand. For biodiversity preservation, the national parks and reserves and the series of improvements in the classified forests were devoted to the protection of fragile ecosystems, species threatened with extinction, etc. The proportion of the areas protected for biodiversity preservation is thus 7.69 percent in 2010, or 2,482,192 ha. The increase in surveillance and control patrols has helped reduce intrusions.

552. As regards the consumption of substances that weaken the ozone layer, the consumption of CFCs was reduced by 87 percent in 2010, and their elimination in 2015 will probably be achieved.

Outlook

553. For 2012, governmental efforts and the support expected from development partners will focus primarily on the pursuit of ongoing actions, in particular: (i) the creation of the Forestry Development Fund (FDF) to ensure the sustainable financing of activities in the sector; and (ii) the creation of ANDEFOR, a structure to manage forests in rural areas that should excite the interest of the people for reforestation and protection of the forests. The human, technical, material, and financial capacities of structures responsible for environmental management should also be strengthened.

554. Forestry resources and aquatic areas will be restored, especially through the improvement, protection, and promotion of the national parks and reserves. Similarly, water resources will be managed in an integrated way. Studies will also be conducted on cleaning up the waters of the Abidjan Lagoon and developing the coastal space.

555. Adjustment measures and plans to mitigate the effects of climate change in the Grand-Lahou region will be implemented.

556. Coupled with the “Don’t dirty my town” campaign, the resumption of the second phase of the “clean country” operation will involve the following communes of the Abidjan district: Abobo, Adjamé, Plateau, Yopougon, and Cocody. Also, the public service of pre-collecting, collecting, and valuing solid waste and the burial of the ultimate waste of the Abidjan district will be set up in 2012.

557. The environmental watch will be mounted through regular sampling and analysis of air, water, and soil quality. The people will also be informed and trained for the safeguard of the environment and the promotion of sustainable development.

558. A sectoral guide to studying the environmental and social impact on health should be compiled. The Libreville Declaration and the Luanda Commitment should be implemented.

559. To consolidate the experiences gained from the actions taken by the government and to meet the sustainable development requirements, it seems important, in the PRSP context, to support the reforms launched in this sector, by: (i) assessing the environmental impacts of the 11 years of crisis on the country’s principal ecosystems, including the establishment of a status report on the issue of climate change; (ii) building the capacities of national organizations, civil society, grassroots communities, and the private sector on sustainable development issues; (iii) supporting the review, formulation, and implementation of policies or programs and tools for the sustainable management of natural resources, in particular the amendment of the Forestry Code, the national policy on sustainable development, and the national plan to combat land deterioration, and the preparation of a national report on the green economy and opportunities for creating green jobs; (iv) supporting the establishment of a framework for consultations among the people, the government, and the private sector with a view to strengthening the public-private partnership for sustainable environmental management; (v) supporting the sensitization/education of the people on climate change; (vi) revitalizing and implementing the plan for management of the Ivorian coast; (vii) supporting the reform of the operating method of the National Environmental Fund and the mobilization of additional resources to finance environmental management; (viii) building the capacities of stakeholders for reducing the effects of deforestation and of forest deterioration (REDD+); (ix) preparing a project to develop and restore the national parks and other protected areas affected by the crisis, including the formulation of a national strategy for the development of ecotourism for poverty reduction; and (x) formulating a national strategy to combat bush fires.

Sanitation

Commitments undertaken during the period

560. As regards the sanitation sector, the government undertook to: (i) strengthen the sanitation system in the town of Abidjan; and (ii) improve access to sustainable sanitation in urban and rural areas.

Actions taken

561. As regards the institutional framework, the new policy of the ministry of construction, sanitation, and urban development, which hinges on the strengthening of the legal and institutional framework for sanitation and drainage, the establishment of plans and blueprints on sanitation and drainage, capacity building for the operations of sanitation and drainage facilities in Côte d’Ivoire and the promotion of individual sanitation in the towns, villages, schools, and health centers, is being validated. In addition, two decrees dealing respectively with the creation and organization of the National Office of Sanitation and Drainage (ONAD) and creation of the National Fund for Sanitation and Drainage (FNAD), were signed on December 28, 2011. Also, the preliminary draft of the Land, Urban Development, and Housing Code is pending validation.

562. As regards the sanitation system in the town of Abidjan, the actions taken involved studies and improvements. The studies pertained to development of the Abobo stormwater basins and the Williamsville thalweg. The improvements consisted of concreting and upgrading the Gourou canals, replacing the asbestos cement pipes with PVC pipes, and expanding the network to include Adjamé Latin, Abobo (four stages), and the Treichville sporting arena neighborhood. The 4th Post-Crisis Emergency Rehabilitation Program (PUR 4), financed by the European Union, and the PUIUR, financed by the World Bank, led to the upgrading of 34 pumping and lifting stations and a surge tank, the construction of seven new stations for blocking wastewater from the collector base, and the installation of 1,600 ml of gravity-flow and wastewater-block pipes, and of 800 ml of drainage canals, in Abobo, Cocody, Koumassi, Port-Bouet, and Yopougon. Other actions resulted in the construction of the Adjamé Garden Center access route.

563. Ongoing actions relate to: (i) studies on updating the Abidjan sanitation blueprint, hydraulic and geotechnical upgrading at Indénié Crossroads and Cocody Bay, and developing the Cocody Bonoumin catchment basin; (ii) reception of the work done to upgrade 13 stations and one surge tank; (iii) reception of the work done to build five stations and the installation of gravity-flow and wastewater-block pipes; (iv) connection of the Aboboté, Belleville, and Palais des Sports neighborhoods to the collector base; (v) the delimitation of public utility space along the thalwegs; and (vi) sensitization of the people for the proper use of sanitation and drainage structures.

564. Concerning the improvement of access to sustainable sanitation in urban (excluding Abidjan) and rural areas, innovative community approaches, such as Community-Led Total Sanitation (ATPC), were adopted in rural areas. They facilitated the certification of 35 FDAL villages out of 127 by the ministry responsible for sanitation, with UNICEF support. In addition, 6,000 latrines were built in 237 villages. Similarly, the ONG Action Against Hunger (ACF) and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) launched the partial upgrading (refilling and decontamination) of latrines at the camp for internally displaced persons at the Duékoué Catholic Mission.

565. In the context of the sensitization of the people, collaboration protocols were signed and are being implemented with neighborhood radio stations in seven areas of the country, for the production and dissemination of microprograms and messages on the use of latrines and hygienic practices. Similarly, 10,000 posters and 17,000 brochures for hygiene sensitization were made and distributed.

566. Studies are under way on the updating of the sanitation blueprints for the towns of Bouaké, Daloa, and San Pédro.

Analysis of results/performance

567. The actions taken made it possible to upgrade the sanitation network and reduce the runoff of wastewater into the Abidjan Lagoon, to influence the people of 127 villages out of 237 to stop defecating in the open air and wash their hands after defecation. However, these results would be even better, had there not been: (i) an absence of national public financing for sanitation in rural areas; (ii) weak external financing; (iii) disruption by the post-electoral crisis in the conduct of studies and works initiated; and (iv) inadequate human and material resources.

Outlook

568. The government’s actions will concern: (i) the implementation of updated sanitation plans and blueprints for the districts of Abidjan and Yamoussoukro and for the towns of San Pédro, Bouaké, and Daloa; (ii) the rehabilitation and maintenance of sanitation and drainage facilities in the district of Abidjan; (iii) the interconnection of the community sanitation networks in the district of Abidjan; (iv) the implementation of a latrine building program at rural, school, and health center locations; and (v) the development of large-scale programs while encouraging the demand for sanitation and hygiene (e.g., ATPC).

Housing and Living Conditions

Commitments undertaken during the period

569. The government’s commitment concerns improving the people’s living conditions and easing the requirements for access to decent housing. Specifically, this involves: (i) formulating and implementing new urban development, planning, and housing arrangements; and (ii) setting up reliable and sustainable housing finance mechanisms, so as to build capacity for the production of decent housing.

Actions taken

570. Concerning the new urban development, planning, and housing arrangements, the achievements relate to: (i) formulating and validating a housing promotion strategy paper; (ii) constituting reserves of land developed for the construction of low-cost housing; and (iii) carrying out studies and repairs in well-off Abidjan neighborhoods under-equipped in miscellaneous roads and networks. In addition, two decrees are being drafted to strengthen the regulatory and institutional framework for the production of, and access to, housing, as well as to establish a plan for support to housing programs in difficulty.

571. As regards the establishment of reliable and sustainable housing finance mechanisms, the Housing Mobilization Account, the Housing Support Fund, and the Urban Land Account were revised to increase the capacity for producing decent housing and promote access to ownership by low-income households. The SICOGI thus received support to resume the “Espérance” housing operations in Cocody, “Jules Ferry” in San Pedro, and “Concorde” in Abobo. In addition, 4,800 housing units are being built in the context of three projects.

Analysis of results/performance

572. The principal constraints and problems in the implementation of actions relate to: (i) the lack of financial resources for the constitution of land reserves and the pursuit of projects; (ii) the inadequacy of premises, human resources, and rolling stock; and (iv) the problems of collaboration with the ministry responsible for construction and urban development.

Outlook

573. In the area of housing, the interventions will concern: (i) drafting a Code on State Lands, Private Lands, Urban Development, and Housing; (ii) updating the urban development blueprints for Abidjan and Yamoussoukro; (iii) drawing up urban development plans with details for Abidjan and Yamoussoukro; (iv) garnering land reserves for the implementation of major government projects; (v) restructuring low-cost housing neighborhoods on habitable sites; (vi) rehousing people from neighborhoods built up in areas unfit for habitation; (vii) acquiring land reserves for housing construction; (viii) setting up housing programs; and (ix) reviving the National Housing Commission.

Social Protection

Commitments over the period

574. Over the relevant period the Government committed to promoting and implementing actions geared to assistance and social welfare programs, protecting and providing equal opportunities for vulnerable populations, and helping communities in distress to coordinate, promote, implement, and evaluate actions in support of solidarity and cohesion.

575. To do this, its interventions have focused on: (i) establishing an effective social safety net; (ii) improving the living conditions of disabled persons; (iii) taking care of, and providing support for the elderly; (iv) strengthening the implementation of actions to protect/promote social welfare activities; (v) improving the quality of care for orphans and vulnerable children as a consequence of HIV/AIDS; (vi) improving the quality of services provided to vulnerable populations; (vii) protecting and reintegrating vulnerable children; (viii) fighting against all disasters and behaviors that destroy the lives of children and hamper their development; (ix) establishing a system for the production of statistical information; (x) reintegrating displaced persons into their communities where they lived before the crisis; and (xi) providing humanitarian assistance to populations affected by the post-election crisis.

Actions taken

576. Concerning the establishment of an effective social security system, reforms have focused on redefining the legal and institutional framework of the National Social Security Fund (CNPS) and the public sector pension fund (CGRAE) and on the establishment of a national system of universal health care coverage [Couverture Médicale Universelle CMU]. Legislation relating to the reform of the pensions branch managed by the CNPS and those relating to the reform of the CGRAE were developed and submitted for consideration and adoption by the Government. Regarding the setting up of universal health care coverage, the conceptual work is underway and a strategy document has been prepared and is awaiting consideration by the Government. Meanwhile, pending its implementation, access to health services has been provided free since April 2011.

577. Concerning actions on behalf of persons with disabilities, several initiatives have been developed and involve the social-professional integration of persons with disabilities through the special recruitment of 300 disabled persons by the Public Service in 2008/2009. Regarding the assistance fund for persons with disabilities under the social assistance commission, out of 1152 requests, there were 180 requests for financial assistance, 11 requests for equipment, and 29 requests for medical assistance, that is, 220 applications that have been satisfied for a total of 73,921,680 CFAF. As part of the process of creating an umbrella organization for all types of disability five federations were created according to type of disability (deaf, stammering, blind, albino, physically handicapped). In addition, 300 children of public specialized agencies attended the commemoration of the International Day of Disabled Persons on December 3, 2011. Concerning the 2011-2012 school year in the specialized agencies, 48 children were selected by the admissions committee: 20 children for the ECIS and 28 for the Ivorian National Institute for the Advancement of the Blind [Institut National Ivoirien pour la Promotion des Aveugles INIPA]. Moreover, the PNRRC also with the support of the UNDP implemented a psycho-medical and economic support project for 57 disabled or limbless demobilized war veterans in the region of Gbeke.

578. Regarding the care and support for the elderly, a directory of 36 associations and organizations for the elderly and pensioners’ associations or NGOs dedicated to their care was developed. The draft decree on the legal framework to provide grants for the operation of associations of/for the elderly is being developed.

579. Concerning improvement in the quality of care for vulnerable children and adolescents, actions taken have helped provide direct assistance to 15,000 orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) with food, psycho-social care, and clothing and have helped to build the capacity of 105 social workers in nutritional care of OVC and of 25 social workers in terms of methodological skills and community revitalization techniques. A platform has been established for stakeholders in the area. Seven Social Centers received dietary demonstration equipment and staff trained in nutrition. The Abobo and Duékoué Social Centers were retrofitted with full computer equipment (OVC database installed and OVC data collection tools) with the assistance of UNICEF and PATH. Seven NGOs received grants with UNICEF’s support to care for 5500 OVC.

580. As regards the protection and reintegration of vulnerable children, particularly in the context of the fight against child trafficking and the worst forms of child labor, two campaigns to create awareness and one TV debate were organized on the harmful effects of child labor in relation to cocoa and coffee producers in the departments of Daloa and Gagnoa. In addition, Law No. 2010-272 of September 30, 2010 prohibiting child trafficking and the worst forms of child labor was publicized. Two training seminars were held, one in favor of social workers in Divo and the other on protecting the rights of the child in Grand-Bassam. Subsequently the support of ECOWAS enabled 90 community leaders to be trained in the fight against child trafficking in the Northeast department (Bondoukou) in 2009. Also, 200 health workers, 100 social workers, 150 police officers, 40 judicial officers, 176 community leaders, and 100 members of NGOs have benefited from training in medical, psycho-social and legal management of victims of violence. In addition, two Regional Committees to fight against child trafficking have been installed in Bondoukou and Daloa. Two decrees were signed, one on the creation of an inter-ministerial committee and the other on the establishment of a committee to monitor actions against child trafficking, exploitation of children, child labor, and the establishment of a Child Labor Monitoring System (CLMS).

581. As part of the promotion of the rights of the child by providing an environment that contributes to their development, 110 children were placed in foster care with a view to their adoption. In addition, 139 children were enrolled in the Zone 4C educational center and in orphanages. Eighteen mother substitutes of the Marie-Therese Houphouet-Boigny d’Adjamé 220 Logements nursery have benefitted from training in the psycho-social care of children aged 0-5 years.

582. Concerning the political and regulatory framework/child protection system: mapping and analysis of the national child protection system is available; the concept document of the child protection system has been developed; and the process of reform of the child protection system has started.

583. As regards the production of statistical data, the system for the collection and management of statistical data on social welfare is operational. Two training workshops were organized in four Regional Divisions (Abidjan Regional Division I; Abidjan Regional Division II; Regional Division of Worodougou; and Regional Division of 18 Montagnes) for managers of organizations on tools for the collection of data. Regarding surveillance, 379 communities in 20 departments are covered by 20 child/Gender-Based Violence (GBV) monitoring and protection networks.

584. Regarding access to specialized child protection services, including those in emergency situations, 1,436 children without parental care (including 649 separated/unaccompanied children) received assistance, 1,762 abused children and women victims of GBV, including 793 victims of sexual violence received assistance, 17,340 children affected by violence because of the crisis received psycho-social care through 58 child-friendly/recreational spaces including 51 in the West and 26 listening posts including 18 in the West, 129 trafficked children have benefited from short-term care and were restored to their families.

585. In terms of birth registration, at least 400,000 children have increased access to civil status services through: (i) community mechanisms for registration of births; (ii) mobilization and community awareness programs carried out in 800 localities; (iii) 2,339 supplementary judgments issued for children out of time; and (iv) a review of the parent/child health record and incorporation of an information and follow-up sheet, on registration of births.

586. On the issue of combating abuse and violence against children/GBV, 379 localities in 19 departments are covered by child protection networks; 232,000 students are aware of the risks of abuse and violence at school, and 686 teachers and educators have been trained in management and the SARA tool in 346 schools in 26 Regional National Education Directorates [Direction Régionale de l’Education Nationale DREN], 407 villages have taken up the fight against female genital mutilation (FGM) (including 139 official groups who have abandoned it) in the five most affected areas.

587. As regards the strengthening of grassroots social organizations, under the “Crisis Emergence Institutional and Multi-sectoral Project “[Projet d’Appui Institutionnel et Multisectoriel à la Sortie de Crise PAIMSC], ADB-funded, seven Social Centers (CS) have undergone rehabilitation and equipping (Bouaké, Dabakala, Man, Guiglo, Korhogo, Odienné, and Sakassou), as well as four Centers for Early Childhood Protection [Centres de Protection de la Petite Enfance CPPE] (Bouaké, Korhogo, Dabakala, and Guiglo). In addition to these actions, the Man Social Center has been equipped and two Centers of Excellence (Bouaké, Korhogo) were created and transformed into an Integrated Centre of Excellence since 2009. In addition, the Duékoué Social Center was rehabilitated by UNICEF in 2011.

588. Regarding the reintegration of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in their communities where they lived before the crisis, this took place in the 2009-2011 period when 5,678 persons, including 8.56percent of the women, were trained and reintegrated through income generating activities (IGA). In addition, actions have focused on the development of lowlands in the former zone on which reliance was placed for the production of food, and the extension of the Handicraft, Mechanics and Agronomy Centre at Man. In addition, 462 IDPs who returned voluntarily to the Bandama valley received training in hairdressing, sewing, reprography, food processing, baking, and livestock rearing. With the help of the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and other humanitarian actors in 2011, 1,129 IDPs have voluntarily returned home from the sites of the Catholic mission of Duekoue and Aboisso. Similarly, IOM rebuilt 300 homes in western Côte d’Ivoire. Finally, 1,308 IDPs will return to their various districts in Duekoue before the end of 2011.

589. Under the initiatives of humanitarian assistance to populations affected by post-election crisis, an increase in the State budget of 90 million CFAF was authorized as an exceptional case; a joint Government and UN advocacy mission was carried out in Europe to raise funds for a humanitarian response; and the National Day of Solidarity commemoration was organized with support from the NGO Children of Africa in Abobo and in 18 other administrative regions (September 16, 2011). Donated food from the Republic of Benin was distributed to the displaced persons of Guiglo and Duékoué (100 tons of rice and 20,000 liters of vegetable oil) and donations of food and non food items from the Russian government (7 tons of canned food, 22 tons of rice, 3 tons of blankets, four tons of tents) were distributed to IDPs. The Government also provided assistance to families of the persons injured in the SOTRA bus accident.

Analysis of outcomes/performance

590. Regarding social security, much of the population still lacks access to basic social services, economic opportunities and currently do not enjoy their economic and social rights. The effects of successive crises have exacerbated social inequalities in a context where the traditional mechanisms for solidarity and community support are fragile. In addition, the Universal Health Insurance adopted since 2001, has remained non-operational to date. Concerning the effects of the post-election crisis of 2011, all actions have resulted in a significant reduction nationally of 71.80percent of the total number of IDPs which rose from 600,958 to 169,486 at the end of November 2011. Moreover, two reception sites in Aboisso have been closed following voluntary departures. However, the parliamentary elections of December 2011 raised fears of the prospect of new moments of insecurity delaying the voluntary return of IDPs. In addition, the need for statistical data and information in the areas of social affairs and solidarity to help in decision-making and policy development remains a major concern. Moreover, the lack of a response mechanism limits the capabilities of organizations in emergency situations.

Outlook

591. As regards Social Protection, actions will focus on (i) improving the coverage of the entire country under social security; (ii) improving the welfare of OVC and their families; (iii) intensifying the fight against child labor and child exploitation; (iv) developing a protective environment for children; (v) finalizing the national social protection policy including a national child protection strategy; (vi) establishing an integrated communication plan within the Ministry; (vii) implementing the national parenting program; (viii) reforming the grassroots social organizations; (ix) increasing assistance to the needy; (x) the continued effective implementation of universal health care coverage as well as reforming parts of the pension line of the CGRAE and the CNPS; (xi) decentralizing specialized organizations to support persons with disabilities; (xii) finalizing the National Community Based Rehabilitation Strategic Plan; and (xiii) reactivating the National Solidarity Fund (NSF) established by Decree No. 99-313 of April 21, 1999.

Civil Protection

Commitments over the period

592. To protect people and property, the Government is committed to building the human, material, and infrastructural capacity of the sector and setting up warning and disaster-management systems.

Actions taken

593. In terms of material and infrastructural capacity building, the construction of Regional Branch of the National Office of Civil Protection [Antenne Régionale de la Protection Civile ARPC] of San Pedro and the Emergency Relief Center [Centre de Secours d’Urgence] of N’Zianouan, and improvement in the management of the barracks of the firemen of Bouaké are in progress. As for equipping the National Office of Civil Protection (ONPC), an agreement donating CFAF 1 billion was signed with Japan in May 2011 to help acquire disaster relief goods. To strengthen physical capacity, the government provided the military firemen’s group with 24 military vehicles. Finally, the Ministry of Construction made the premises of the former General Equalization Fund [Caisse Générale de Péréquation] at ABENGOUROU available to the ONPC to house the future barracks of the fire department.

594. Concerning disaster management, the mapping of risk areas in the district of Abidjan has been available since May 2011. For risk prevention and flood-related claims, many awareness and information campaigns have been conducted among populations at risk. Furthermore, the implementation of the Organization for Disaster Relief [Organisation de la Réponse de Sécurité Civile ORSEC] resulted in the removal of construction and dwellings from gullies in the district of Abidjan; the clearing of storm-water basins at the Adjamé garden space center, in Yopougon Yahosehi, and in Bonoumin-Boston; and in the unblocking and cleaning out of several gutters in 10 communes of Abidjan.

595. As for disaster assistance and capacity building, the Blue Plan, the victim assistance component of the ORSEC flood plan, was activated. Over 500 families evicted or victims of flood in Bonoumin-Boston, Abobo, Attécoubé, and Yopougon-Yahosehi have each received 100,000 CFAF in relocation assistance. In addition, with support from UNFPA and WFP, these populations have benefited from immunization clinics and donations of food comprising 126 tons of rice, 9 tons of oil, 1.5 tons of salt, 15 tons of flour and legumes. Non food donations distributed included 1,500 dignity kits, 1,500 seals, 400 mattresses, 400 mats, 800 impregnated mosquito nets, 800 blankets, two computers, and one video projector. Similarly, in the case of disaster relief for victims of fires, 157 families from Yopougon-Gbaoubli have benefited from support consisting essentially of 12.5 tons of rice, 460 mats, 150 cartons of soap, 150 cartons of water, 63 cartons of tomato, and 3,000 liters of oil.

Table 8ONPC Interventions over the period 2009-2011
YearFireAccidentActs of aggressionTransport for the sickEvent*DrownedTotal
20096944 33911055590725 860
20106184 1598863783755 660
20114193 43383370491124 466
Total (2009-2011)1 73111 9312811 56222225915 986
Source: ONPC, Nov. 2011

Event: flood, landslide, water leak.

Source: ONPC, Nov. 2011

Event: flood, landslide, water leak.

Analysis of outcomes/performance

596. Financial resources were used to start construction on one Regional Branch of the National Office of Civil Protection (ARPC) in San Pedro out of 11 contemplated under Decree No. 2008-60 of February 28, 2008, amending Decree No. 2000-822 of November 22, 2000 on the establishment, empowerment and organization of the National Office of Civil Protection, and work was started on one emergency center out of 11 planned. Nonetheless, all actions under the ORSEC plan have reduced to some extent the number of victims from 11 deaths in 2010 to 6 deaths in 2011, reduced damage, and reduced disaster interventions, which moved from 90 relief operations in 2009 to 49 in 2011.

Outlook

597. The outlook for Emergency Preparedness involves (i) the rehabilitation and equipping of five firefighters’ barracks, (ii) the completion of the N’Zianouan emergency center, (iii) the construction of 10 regional branches of civil protection centers and 10 emergency centers and (iv) the strengthening of disaster management.

Sports and Leisure

Commitments over the period

598. As regards promoting sport and physical activities, the Government committed to raising the level of competitiveness of athletes through the revitalization of physical activity and sport.

599. Effort to be agreed on should help to establish a sound policy for management of existing infrastructure and expand the construction of infrastructure over the entire country. Specific measures should be taken to ensure physical activity is practiced at a young age and in school. Also young talent identified will benefit from regular monitoring and the pool selected will be provided with assistance to practice high performance sport.

Action taken

600. Activities conducted in relation to youth, sport and leisure have focused on renovating the stadiums of the National Office of Sports (NSO) in Daloa and Gagnoa. Similarly, the National Institute of Youth and Sports (INJS) was renovated and equipped.

601. Moreover, draft laws relating to (i) the organization of sport and physical activities; (ii) the restructuring of the INJS; (iii) the Ivorian Office for School and University Sports [Office Ivoirien de Sport Scolaire et Universitaire OISSU]; and (iv) the National Office of Sports have been developed.

602. Finally, activities relating to (i) the rehabilitation of the Bocanda Municipal Stadium, (ii) the construction of the Sangouiné ground works, and (iii) the construction of a recreation area at Djébonoua were carried out by local authorities of these areas.

Outlook

603. The Government plans to increase the supply of infrastructure adapted to socio-educational activities, sports and leisure. In this context, the State shall (i) rehabilitate and construct sports facilities for schools and regional stadiums; (ii) rehabilitate and equip Regional Sports Offices; and (iii) revitalize the activities of Ivorian Office for School and University Sports to promote the practice of high level sports and take over by identifying young talent.

Culture

Commitments over the period

604. In the field of culture, the commitments of the State have dealt with: (i) the identification, restoration and promotion of cultural heritage; (ii) the protection of intellectual works by fighting against piracy; and (iii) the creation, and rehabilitation of areas for the dissemination and encouragement of cultural and artistic expression.

Actions taken

Table 9Illustration: actions taken in 2009 in the area of Culture
ActivitiesCost
National heritage and museums8,000,000,000
Rehabilitation of the Palais de la Culture50,000,000
Construction of the Jean-Marie Adjaffi de Bettié Museum39,996,565
Construction of the Lycée d’Enseignement Artistique (LEA)50,000,000
Construction and extension of the National Higher Institute for Arts and Cultural Activities [Institut National Supérieur des Arts et de l’Action Culturelle INSAAC]40,000,000
Total8,179,996,565
Source: Ministry of Culture, 2011
Source: Ministry of Culture, 2011

605. In addition, the process for nominating the town of Grand Bassam as a UNESCO World Heritage site initiated in 2006 was reactivated in 2011.

606. In 2010, the Government funded the International Short Film Festival of Abidjan (FICA). A competition for young filmmaker nationals of the WAEMU entitled CLAP IVOIRE as well as a procession on social cohesion were held in 2011.

Outlook

607. In the area of culture, the main actions will include: (i) the implementation of two studies on the sector’s contribution to the economic and social development of Côte d’Ivoire and strategies for the development of the music, film, and book sectors in Côte d’Ivoire; (ii) the creation of a virtual library for the preservation of, and dissemination of information on, well-known cultural heritage properties; (iii) the revision of the law on the protection of national cultural heritage and on the protection of intellectual works; (iv) the development and adoption of the Law on National Cultural Policy; (v) the initiation of proceedings for registration of cultural sites of the historic town of Grand-Bassam, the mountains of Ahouakro and the Sudano-Sahelian mosques in the north of the country on the UNESCO World Heritage List; (vi) the organization of the Market for African Performing Arts [Marché des Arts et du Spectacle Africain MASA]; (vii) the organization of different festivals and fairs; (viii) the rehabilitation and retrofitting of museums and cultural centers; (ix) the construction and equipping of new museums, new theaters and libraries; and (x) the decentralization of training facilities in handicrafts.

Tourism and Handicrafts

Commitments over the period

608. In the area of tourism, the objective is to make tourism an industry for economic and social development. To achieve this goal, the government’s commitments have focused on: (i) the identification and development of new tourism sites; (ii) the training of stakeholders for better control of marketing to improve the quality of services; (iii) the creation and improvement of infrastructure (road transit centers, airports) providing access to tourist sites; (iv) securing tourist sites; and (v) the intensification of investment promotion in the tourism and hospitality sectors. To do this, the Government has committed to establishing a legal institutional framework conducive to the development and promotion of tourism. Similarly, the country intends to participate in the organization of various tourism forums to promote Côte d’Ivoire as a tourist destination.

609. As regards handicraft, the State is committed to: (i) strengthening the legal and institutional framework; (ii) strengthening the capacity of the handicraft sector’s management structures; and (iii) creating new infrastructure and rehabilitating existing ones.

Actions taken

610. With regard to the Tourism and Handicraft sector, the move from five to two in the security level compliant with UN standards has enabled Côte d’Ivoire to record an increase in international tourist arrivals. The Tourism Development Fund has been operational since 2011.

611. From 2008 to 2011, field visits have been conducted throughout the country to raise awareness about the importance of tourism and to encourage sector operators to continue their activities.

612. A platform has been established for collaboration between SODERTOUR-LACS1, the Ivorian Office of Parks and Reserves (OIPR), the Territorial Administration, local councilors, economic operators, and local residents to ensure better tourism management of the Wildlife Reserve of Abokouamekro. Kings and traditional leaders have been made aware of the goal of peace and social cohesion through tourism through the technical and financial support of Côte d’Ivoire Tourisme in organizing the Festival of the Route of Kings and Queens (FESTIROIS, 2011). To the same end, a discovery trip was organized in the region of Man on September 26, 2011 to make policy makers and community leaders aware of the issue of peace through tourism: local governments, local elected officials. and the religious leaders of Man were involved.

613. Helping to promote income generating activities on the periphery of the Wildlife Reserve of Abokouamékro included the following: awareness meetings were held with youth associations from eight villages on July 3, 12, and 13, 2011 and four potential projects were identified, one of which was adopted. A management committee of the Tourism Development Fund (TDF) was established in 2010 and is functioning. Settlement Schemes shown on the Cadastral Map at the Assinie Site and tourism development on the banks of the lagoon side of the District of Abidjan were launched in July 2011.

614. As regards investment promotion, sector actors have participated in fairs and trade shows in Europe and Asia. Similarly, economic promotion missions were carried out in Morocco and France in 2011.

615. In terms of achievements, the hotels Hambol de Katiola and Le Carrefour de Séguéla were rehabilitated and returned to service in 2009 and 2011. The foundation stone was laid in November and in December 2011 for construction of a hotel in Abidjan and another at Yamoussoukro with a combined capacity of 700 rooms.

616. In the area of handicrafts, the actions taken by the National Chamber of Trades of Côte d’Ivoire in collaboration with the Ministry for Handicrafts, address the issues of governance and capacity building. Specifically, the draft handicraft code was developed and submitted to Government for adoption. Similarly, the Craft Support and Promotion fund (FAPA) was established and has been operational since 2010. A State Advisory Committee/Small- and Medium Sized Handicraft Enterprise was established in 2011 and is operational. The Ministry in charge of Handicrafts and the Promotion of SMEs helped associations of professional chauffeurs to establish a federation.

617. Concerning capacity building, the National Chamber of Trades signed a partnership agreement with the National Chamber of Trades of la Sarre (France) for the implementation of a project for the training of operators called “Interregional Network for the Adaptation of Technical and Vocational Education to the needs of the Crafts” [Réseau Interrégional pour la formation technique et professionnelle adaptée à l’Artisanat RIFA].” With a total cost of EUR 407,692 (267,430,389.12 CFAF), this project is 90percent financed by the European Union and 10 percent or 26,703,695 CFAF by the State of Côte d’Ivoire.

618. Also, as part of infrastructure improvements, sites for craftsmen were identified at N’dotré (43 hectares), Kumasi (9 hectares), San Pedro (29 hectares), Yamoussoukro (19 hectares). A project for the construction of 570 stalls for scrap dealers who had left Adjamé has been confirmed. Since 2010, the State has begun to rehabilitate the craft village of Grand Bassam.

Analysis of outcomes/performances

619. The flow of tourists increased from 205,152 in 2008 to 231,000 in 2009. The growth rate which was 8.86 percent between 2004 and 2006 rose to 12.61 percent from 2008 to 2009.

620. Nationally, the movement of people has increased dramatically following the policy to strive for peace. The most important flows of domestic tourism are found in and around Abidjan, on the beaches of Bassam, Assinie, and parts of the country such as San Pedro during weekends and holidays.

621. Concerning the rate of hotel occupancy, almost all of the accommodation capacity of Côte d’Ivoire is concentrated in and around Abidjan. Thus, the district of Abidjan, with about 5,500 rooms approved is home to over 70 percent of the hotel capacity of Côte d’Ivoire. This capacity, which was 12,000 rooms in 2002, is estimated at approximately 15,000 rooms in 2009. The occupancy rate noted on average over the whole country was 56 percent in 2009. In particular, the occupancy rate in 2008 was 70.52 percent in Grand-Bassam, 49.85 percent in Yamoussoukro, 44.58 percent in Dabou, 45.72 percent in San Pedro and in the Abidjan district it was 58.22 percent in 2009.

Outlook

622. To ensure the development of tourism and make Côte d’Ivoire a tourist destination, several actions will be implemented over the coming months. These will be to: (i) update, adopt and disseminate the draft Tourism Code; (ii) develop, adopt, and popularize the draft Tourism Code; (iii) set up an information system on tourism establishments; (iv) continue to restore the heritage tourism of the State; (v) create new tourist sites; (vi) establish the National Coordinating Committee (PP Partnership) of the WAEMU Tourism Development Program; (vii) continue the project for the development of the lagoon banks of the District of Abidjan; (viii) continue to promote investments in the tourism sector to create 5,000 new rooms by 2015, which would generate 12,500 direct and indirect jobs; and (ix) create a Higher Institute of Tourism in Yamoussoukro.

623. In the area of handicraft, in order to better target interventions for the best outcomes, the Government will place special emphasis in the coming years on strengthening the legal and institutional framework. Thus, the Handicraft Code, the draft law relating to the social security and welfare of craft workers, the legal framework for continuous learning and training, the legal framework for creation of craft sites, and the strategic plan for the development of handicrafts will be developed, adopted and popularized. To do this, it will be necessary to conduct a census of the stakeholders and a census on awareness, training and grouping of the latter in economic interest groups [groupements d’intérêts économiques GIE] and trades. Other actions will focus on the rehabilitation of handicraft centers and the building of new infrastructure. Finally, the capacity of organizations and employees in charge of the handicraft sector will be strengthened and handicrafts will be promoted by a system of codification and certification. Similarly, elections to the National Chamber of Trades of Côte d’Ivoire remain a state priority.

Domestic Trade

Commitments over the period

624. In this context, the overall objective of the domestic trade sector is to promote trade activity through better operating techniques on the part of nationals and the strengthening of organizations to promote domestic trade (the Aid Office for the marketing of food products [Office d’aide a la commercialisation des produits vivriers OCPV], the Bouaké Wholesale Market, and collection centers).

625. In particular, actions to be taken are (i) organizing the legal and regulatory framework of domestic Trade organizations; (ii) improving and modernizing distribution channels; (iii) strengthening capacity of the framework organizations; (iv) establishing a financing system for operators; and (v) monitoring the food market.

Actions taken

626. The Competition Commission has been constituted and the implementing decree will be signed during the first quarter of 2012. In 2010. The Ministry of Commerce carried out two campaigns on verification of measuring instruments. In 2011, steps were taken to put a stop to counterfeit goods, smuggled goods, and shoddy products (oil, milk, fuel, fish, loincloth and condoms). Meanwhile, discussion sessions with operators in the sectors that supply basic necessities (sugar, rice, milk, meat) has enabled measures to be taken to stabilize the market and make it competitive. Actions were taken against the dominant position practices and this led to the removal of clauses from provisions giving priority status to rice importers thereby preventing monopolies. Studies for a Single Window Trade Portal and Business Facilitation Portal were completed. These two systems may materialize in 2012. The draft law on consumption was approved and is awaiting adoption by the National Assembly.

627. In 2011, the Bouaké Wholesale Market was rehabilitated in order to restore it to its role as liaison between producers from the North and the markets of the South.

Outlook

628. For 2012, in addition to functional trade courts, the State plans to set up the competition and cost of living commission in order to establish a culture of compliance with trade regulations. Moreover, the restructuring of the OCPV allows for greater consideration of problems in the food sector (wholesale markets, transport and storage of goods etc.).

629. The Ministry will initiate a series of measures aimed at lowering the cost of living. A pilot project for placing 2,200 young Ivorians in the retail distribution trade and the refreshments trade in order to take the price trend to acceptable proportions has already started in advance of the study phase. This project should ultimately create 1,100 direct jobs and 4,400 indirect jobs.

630. Actions will be implemented to make business information available through: (i) publication of a monthly newsletter of food prices; (ii) the work of the Commission for the Harmonization of Foreign Trade Statistics; and (iii) the creation of a Trade Information Centre with the National Trade Development Organization of Côte d’Ivoire [Association pour la promotion des exportations de Côte d’Ivoire APEXCI].

Population

Commitments over the period

631. The main commitment in the period was the carrying out of the Fourth General Population and Housing Census [Recensement Général de la Population et de l’Habitat RGPH] of Côte d’Ivoire which is part of the series of decennial population censuses decided on since 1987 by the Ivorian Government. This operation has the following main components: (i) RGPH design; (ii) raising awareness; (iii) counting; (iv) data utilization and analysis; and (v) publication and dissemination of outcomes.

Actions taken

632. In the context of the completion of the Fourth General Population and Housing Census ( RGPH), a review of the RGPH design to suit the new realities of Côte d’Ivoire was carried out. Also, the institutional bodies (national census committee, steering committee, permanent technical Census Bureau) have been activated and they have held at least one meeting with the exception of the national committee, which is going through its membership renewal process.

633. In addition, the revision and updating of all technical documents (project documents, revised budget, timing chart, advocacy materials) of the RGPH was completed. However, the RGPH suffers from weak mobilizing of resources currently estimated at more than 11 billion CFAF, constant postponements since 2008 and the taking over of certain activities thereby causing a total increase of nearly 3 billion CFAF francs in the cost of the project.

634. Four hundred cartography officers at Masters level and more were trained and they carried out the census mapping pilot project in Alépé in 2011 after the RGPH design was finalized.

635. Moreover, in the context of the search for improved understanding and consideration of socio-demographic issues in development planning, the RAPID Model Côte d’Ivoire 2010-2040 highlighting the economic consequences of population growth, as well as modules that build awareness of population and development issues have been finalized.

636. The main action underway is the construction of a new codification of parts of the country to be included in the work of the fourth RGPH in accordance with the administrative redistricting of Côte d’Ivoire.

Outlook

637. Key future actions include: (i) the accelerated census mapping operation scheduled to begin in late February 2012); (ii) completion of mapping and the training of collection agents from the first quarter of 2012 as part of the pilot census in 60 census districts; (iii) implementation of the pilot census scheduled for late March 2012; (iv) implementation of the fourth RGPH in November 2012; and (v) creation of the National Population Office [Office National de la Population ONP].

Chapter 4: Transformation of Cote D’ivoire Into a Dynamic Actor on the Regional and International Scene

International Cooperation and Sub-Regional Integration

Commitments over the period

638. In the area of international cooperation and regional integration, the Government is committed to strengthening its cooperation with the international community, consolidating its actions and its place in international organizations, and continuing its efforts to consolidate the gains made in sub-regional markets.

Actions taken

639. Regarding the governance of the sector, the policy document on “Ivorian Diplomacy, Missions, Performance, Prospects 2025 and Charter” [La diplomatie ivoirienne, Missions, Bilan, Perspectives 2025 et Charte] was drafted and adopted. In addition, a strategy document on International cooperation is being developed. As well, a document on Côte d’Ivoire’s integration policy is being developed. It should also be noted that a decree on the status of the diplomatic corps was adopted. Moreover several missions for the inspection of diplomatic and consular offices were conducted. The most recent ones dealt with the audit of embassies in the following capitals: Tel Aviv and Brussels; Pretoria, Madrid, Rome and Vatican; Bamako, Addis Ababa, Tehran, Geneva and Bern; Yaoundé, London, Paris, UNESCO and Libreville. Moreover, draft decrees ratifying 17 international conventions and agreements on the fight against money laundering and the financing of terrorism have been developed.

640. As part of its continued efforts towards consolidating the gains made in the sub-regional markets, the Government obtained a suspension of the Senegalese regulation prohibiting the entry of palm oil into its territory, pending the final decision of the WAEMU Court of Justice. In addition, there have been discussions in the Cabinet on Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) and a request for capacity building of the National EPA was submitted to the Government. In the same vein, the Government participated in negotiation meetings on the Economic Partnership Agreement. In terms of regional integration, the interim report on the statutory audit of the services market funded by the European Union and the network of researchers from International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP) is available. In addition, as part of African cooperation, the Government has participated in meetings organized with Burkina Faso, Mali, Nigeria, Morocco, and Ghana. The Support Program for Trade and Regional Integration (PACIR) started in February 2010 with support from the European Union which finances it up to EUR 16 million. This program will be implemented over four years.

641. In terms of strengthening its cooperation with the regional and international community, Côte d’Ivoire has restored its relations with all its bilateral and multilateral partners, which was evidenced by the participation in several missions abroad of the Head of State and Cabinet members. In return, Côte d’Ivoire in 2011 recorded the visit of important foreign dignitaries. And joint committees for cooperation have been reactivated in particular with Burkina Faso, France, and Ghana. In order to improve safety for its guests, a seminar on diplomatic privileges and immunities was held for law enforcement officers and state officials involved in the implementation of such privileges and immunities. Moreover, Community legislation (AU, ECOWAS and WAEMU) not ratified by Côte d’Ivoire was identified in 2011 and will be submitted to Parliament after legislative elections. Under the ECOWAS-China partnership, the country obtained the support of ECOWAS to ensure that new proposals were submitted to Chinese authorities for funding. In addition, diplomatic efforts initiated at the sub-regional level saw the implementation of major interconnection projects, the construction of infrastructures such as the Yamoussoukro-Ouagadougou highway, the construction and modernization of the Abidjan-Niger railway to Niamey, the completion of the railway connecting San Pedro to Mount Klahoyo (Guinea) with a view to mining the deposit common to both states, the improvement and asphalting of the roads to Liberia and Mali and the electricity interconnection between Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Mali, and Burkina Faso to be implemented. The State has created two new posts in 2011 of trade commissioner to China and India.

642. In terms of consolidation of actions and the place of Côte d’Ivoire in sub-regional and international organizations, the Government began to pay off the arrears of contributions due to International Organizations (the sum of $1.5 billion CFAF francs out of a total of 17 billion was paid off). In addition, Côte d’Ivoire has contributed to the revitalization of the Mano River Union, the reactivation of the Entente Council [Conseil de l’Entente], and participated in the development of the ECOWAS Community Program.

643. To improve the reputation of the Côte d’Ivoire major rehabilitation, security and equipping work was undertaken in the central office of the Ministry of State, Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Similarly, the premises of embassies have been rehabilitated. Also, a sizeable payment of arrears in scholarships, rent, tuition fees, and operating expenses of embassies was made for about 20 billion CFAF out of a total of about 26 billion. Moreover, there are no longer any arrears of wages in embassies.

644. As regards strengthening cooperation links with the regional and international community, there has been an improvement. In terms of consolidating the gains in sub-regional markets, several actions have been taken but more needs to be done for the implementation of community projects. The main constraint is the lack of a budget for the implementation of major actions, which therefore calls for an increase in the budget of the Ministry of African Integration.

Analysis of outcomes/performances.

645. As regards strengthening cooperation links with the regional and international community, there has been an improvement. In terms of consolidating the gains in the sub-regional markets, several actions have been taken but more needs to be done for the implementation of community projects. The main constraint is the lack of a budget for the implementation of major actions, which therefore calls for an increase in the budget of the Ministry of African Integration.

Outlook

646. As regards international cooperation and subregional integration, the outlook is seen in terms of: (i) development of a strategy paper on international cooperation; (ii) development and approval of a national strategy document on African integration; (iii) settlement of arrears in contributions to international organizations including the WTO; (iv) participation in community organizations and joining the Standing Committee on the InterState Committee for the Fight against Drought in the Sahel and West Africa; (v) organization of annual meetings to promote community programs; (vi) the provision of support, in collaboration with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), for the voluntary return of Refugees of the Sub-region; (viii) signature of the draft decrees on the ratification of 17 international conventions and agreements on the fight against money laundering and the financing of terrorism; (ix) reactivation and creation of joint committees; and (x) continued clearing off of the arrears in embassies.

Chapter 5: Lessons Learned From the Implementation of the PRSP

647. Leveraging this review enables best practices to be defined, lessons learned and limitations in implementation to be formulated, which should guide working groups in 2012 when preparing the next report.

5.1 Best Practices

648. Under the 2011 review, positive points were noted that will be further strengthened to improve significantly the process of reviewing the National Development Plan. These include:

  • The broad participation of the actors

649. The system put in place, both centrally and locally, has enabled all stakeholders to participate in various stages of the process. The review was an opportunity for each of the stakeholders to discuss and make recommendations for a successful implementation of the National Development Plan which replaces the PRSP.

  • The existence of local committees

650. Local committees have been active in producing the monitoring report through the provision of data or regional information from local authorities or sector ministries. Local committees have also revealed development activities conducted in the field by some NGOs and development partners without these interventions being in line with a framework document validated by the Heads of the sector ministries or decentralized authorities. In short, the existence of local committees has greatly assisted in the collection and validation of regional data.

  • The existence of sector correspondents

651. The existence of sector correspondents has facilitated the collection of information and helped to meet deadlines for the completion of various stages of production of the report.

  • Effective coordination of activities

652. Coordination of the production of the report was provided by the Group of local coordinators of the Permanent Technical Secretariat of the PRSP. The Group facilitated the sharing and ownership of the process of collecting, processing and preparation of sector reports. Frequent interaction with the focal points of ministries, local actors, the technical and financial partners, and managers of projects and programs have helped to ensure proper coordination of all activities of the production process of the National Report.

5.2 Lessons Learned

  • A better understanding of the workings of local development

653. The implementation of the PRSP helped in the understanding of the local development mechanisms including interrelation and interaction mechanisms between local actors (prefectural authorities, traditional authorities, local elected officials, civil society organizations). Thus, for the successful implementation of actions in the fight against poverty and for local development, the involvement of some players is more than necessary. These partners are the prefectural authorities, leaders of decentralized authorities, and to a lesser extent the traditional authorities (traditional chiefs). These authorities have a high regard for people who listen to them, which can be leveraged to mobilize them or heighten their awareness in support of any action.

  • The need to coordinate the actions of different actors

654. It was also reported that some actors such as NGOs and some development partners are conducting development activities in the field, without the responsible sector ministries or decentralized authority being informed and without these interventions being in line with a framework document approved by these officials. This situation makes it difficult to understand and to assess overall the actions taken.

655. From this report, there appears to be a need to strengthen the monitoring and coordination of all actions at the local level to ensure interventions are in line with the framework document.

  • The need to strengthen the capacity of certain actors

656. The implementation of the PRSP showed a weakness in operational capacity (capacities in the area of planning, as well as in the area of material and financial resources to cover the planned actions) of some local actors (decentralized organizations, deconcentrated organizations, civil society organizations) and even central Management and this hampers the definition, implementation and monitoring of poverty reduction and development actions in the field.

  • The need to reconcile the global and the local

657. The coordination of development actions between the overall level (national or ministerial) and the local level is not systematic. It was found that the central organizations have no information about the actions of their deconcentrated or decentralized bodies.

658. In addition, some bodies are conducting development activities according to priorities other than those defined in their policy defining document.

659. All these situations make coordination, information gathering, and evaluation of actions difficult. Thus, the actions to be taken must be in line with the national document (National Development Plan) taking into account all sectors and specifying the areas of intervention and the outcomes expected.

5.3 Limits in the Implementation of PRSPs

660. Despite efforts by stakeholders (Government, Technical and Financial Partner (TFP), civil society, private sector and regional actors), the process has faced difficulties related to several factors that should be corrected to improve the quality of outcomes from the implementation of the National Development Plan. Among other challenges and constraints, the following were noted:

  • Late implementation of the PRSP Institutional Framework

661. The PRSP institutional framework, governed by Decree No. 2009-258 of August 6, 2009, was adopted by the Cabinet four months after approval of the PRSP by the Bretton Woods institutions. The constituent bodies namely the Local Monitoring Committees, the Supervision Committee, and the National Monitoring Council were established in September 2009, December 2009, and January 2010 respectively. The late implementation has had a negative impact on the monitoring process and actual outcomes on the ground.

  • A dysfunctional institutional framework

662. Because of the socio-political climate and the priority given to the crisis, the institutional framework for M & E has barely functioned. Indeed, the National Monitoring Council, chaired by the Prime Minister, scheduled to meet twice a year and the Supervision Committee scheduled to meet each quarter, have never met. Only the local committees met once in 2010 and 2011.

663. This situation is due to the unwieldy nature of the bodies owing to the excessive number of members, to the members of various bodies not taking ownership of their missions and tasks, and to the problem of the institutional anchoring of the Permanent Technical Secretariat (PTS) in the Ministry of Planning and Development.

  • Difficulties in lining up the Priority Action Plans of the PRSP with the budget cycle

664. The Priority Action Plan (PAP) 2009-2013, developed six months after the adoption of the PRSP, has had difficulties lining up with the budget cycle. Finalization occurred during the implementation of the 2010 budget, which did not allow the PAP actions to be recorded in the budget in 2009 and 2010.

665. In addition, the activities identified in the PRSP action plans were not always those written in the business plans of the various sector ministries. Similarly, the relationship between the measures included in the PAPs and the formulation of projects included in the Public Investment Program and in the budget was not always very clear.

  • A lack of indicators and targets in the PAP

666. The PRSP Priority Action Plan did not identify indicators and targets to carry out monitoring. Indicators and targets have indeed been identified by sector in the final document but could not be addressed by objective and under annual targets in the PAP.

  • A limited availability of statistics

667. Having regard to the particular situation of Côte d’Ivoire during this period, the statistics provided were generally limited especially the administrative statistics produced by sector ministries. Upstream, the failure to implement the General Census of Population and Housing (RGPH 2008) has also been a major constraint in the production of statistical data.

668. Similarly, production of the indicators identified (outcomes and impacts) in the PRSP depended largely on surveys, none of which was conducted during the period 2009-2011. These include the Survey of Living Standards, Survey of Demography and Health, Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS), etc. This made it difficult to measure progress toward achieving fixed objectives.

669. In addition, data especially those produced routinely were not available at the right time to help in monitoring the projects and programs implemented. Indeed, data for year n-1 were available at the earliest the sixth month of year n, which is not consistent with the production of the Monitoring Report which is carried out in the first quarter.

  • A lack of simulation tools

670. The Permanent Technical Secretariat of the PRSP, the operational body monitoring the implementation of the PRS, has not sufficiently leveraged the tools at its disposal for the analysis of poverty (poverty map, Simulations for Social Indicators and Poverty (SimSIP), etc.). Moreover, it has not benefited from capacity building including new tools intended to enable it to simulate the impact of policy changes (reforms) on poverty (extent, depth, severity) and measure the changes in the incidence of poverty outside the survey years.

Conclusion and Recommendations

671. Outcomes of the implementation of the PRSP for the period 2009-2011 are mitigated because of the direction of the Government’s efforts in order to end the crisis and the consequences of the post-election crisis of 2011.

672. Côte d’Ivoire experienced a post-election crisis that has had disastrous consequences on economic activities, the basic social infrastructure, and the fragile social cohesion. This crisis, which lasted nearly five months, thus brings up new social and economic challenges. In order to take into account on the one hand, these new challenges and on the other hand, commitments leading to the completion point under the HIPC initiative, the Government prepared a National Development Plan (NDP) for the period 2012-2015.

673. The NDP draws its substance from the updated PRSP, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Economic and Financial Program, local and sector policies as well as the Government Program of the President of the Republic and has therefore become the new frame of reference for public interventions.

674. The vision of the President of the Republic is to make Côte d’Ivoire an emerging country by 2020. To achieve this vision of development, the NDP should at the end of its implementation in 2015 have laid the basic foundation for making Côte d’Ivoire an emerging country by 2020. The overall result has been translated into five strategic outcomes according to the Results Based Management (RBM) approach which was used in the formulation of the NDP. These major outcomes are:

  • (1) People live in harmony in a secure society in which good governance is ensured;
  • (2) The creation of national wealth is expanding, sustained, and the fruits of growth are shared equitably;
  • (3) People, especially women, children, and other vulnerable groups have access to quality social services in an equitable manner;
  • (4) People live in a healthy environment and have a good quality of life; and
  • (5) Côte d’Ivoire is effectively repositioned on the regional and international stage.

675. The NDP also includes Priority Action Plans that describe in detail the actions to be taken, the scheduling of these actions and the institutions responsible for their implementation, as well as the outcome indicators. The NDP leverages all commitments of the PRSP and their implementation will be punctuated by the production of an annual monitoring report to track progress towards achieving outcomes.

676. Nevertheless, the implementation of the NDP could be thwarted if the following recommendations are not sufficiently analyzed and taken into account by the competent authorities. These are:

  • Establish and make operational as soon as possible the institutional framework for monitoring/evaluation of the implementation of NDP;
  • Get out quickly from the emergency situation and the recovery following the postelection crisis to refocus government efforts on actions to fight against poverty, and for development;
  • Align the budget cycle effectively with the priorities set by the NDP;
  • Make every effort to achieve the completion point under the HIPC Initiative.
1State company whose primary mission is to promote tourism in the region of Lacs

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