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Solomon Islands

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
Published Date:
March 2016
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1 Introduction

This Medium Term Development Plan (MTDP) 2016-2020 sets out development programmes and projects supporting the draft National Development Strategy (NDS) 2016-2035 objectives. The NDS 2016-2035 is under preparation; the framework has been endorsed by Cabinet. The NDS 2016-2035 will be completed by end 2015. Consistent with the Public Financial Management Act 2013, section 45 (2), it is required that at least three months before the start of the financial year, the Minister for Development Planning and Aid Coordination shall table in the National Parliament and officallly publish the details of the Government’s medium term development plan – this was done. This document has been updated following 2016 budget revisions.

The programs and projects included in the MTDP are in line with the emphasis of the Democratic Coalition for Change (DCC) Government policy priorities, as presented in the DCC Policy Statement and Translation Document. The Government has emphasised the need for sustainable economic growth as the way to guarantee a reasonable standard of living for the people of the Solomon Islands. Its focus is on economic growth and effective service delivery. It has emphasised the need for fundamental and sector reform programmes, including in governance and anti-corruption, and in the productive, resource and social sectors. While in line with DCC priorities, many programmes and projects included in this MTDP are carry-over from previous MTDPs and the NDS 2011-2020.

The Budget Strategy for 2016 notes the need to balance investments that stimulate economic growth, while ensuring services to citizens continue to be met, and in a fiscal environment where revenue growth is historically low. The budget needs to be targeted. Increased investment will focus on a number of major infrastructure projects, particularly in the energy and transport sectors.

This MTDP 2016-2020 continues the change introduced in the MTDP2014-2018, from lump sum development budgets to budget proposals fully set out in the Chart of Accounts. Improved details in the presentation of SIG and donor proposals is a key part of the Public Financial Management Reform Roadmap, as is the strengthened alignment and reporting of donor assistance. The key parts of the Roadmap related to the MTDP “to make the MTDP the SIG central multi-year planning document” are discussed briefly in Section 5 and show the way ahead for development of the MTDP. Improvements, however, are still needed in processes and compliance.

2 Government’s Objectives, Priorities and Strategies

2.1 National Development Objectives

Consultations are ongoing in developing the National Development Strategy 2016-2035, which will be completed by end 2015 for approval by Government. Consultations include all provinces, levels of Government, development partners, private sector and civil society. It takes into account the DCC Government Policy Statement and Policy Strategy and Translation documents, and progress on the NDS 2011-2020, but with a longer term vision and emphasis. The NDS includes both long term objectives, together with medium term strategies and priorities aimed at achieving these objectives. The Budget Strategy stipulates that “the National Development Strategy will continue to assist the Government to prioritise and to advance important reforms’.

The overall vision and long term objective of the NDS is to achieve an improvement in the social and economic livelihoods of all Solomon Islanders, through a return to economic growth, by delivering on the following five long-term national objectives:

Objective 1Sustained and inclusive economic growth
Objective 2Poverty alleviated across the whole of the Solomon Islands, basic needs addressed and food security improved; benefits of development more equitably distributed
Objective 3All Solomon Islanders have access to quality social services, including education and health
Objective 4Resilient and environmentally sustainable development with effective disaster risk management
Objective 5Unified nation with stable and effective governance and public order

A return to economic growth and continued sustainable and inclusive economic and social development will provide the economic and social capital that will enable the improvement in the economic and social wellbeing of all Solomon Islanders. Sustainable and inclusive growth is seen as the key to long term development, necessary for the alleviation and prevention of poverty and hunger, particularly in the rural areas of the Solomon Islands. It will also provide resources for the provision of adequate, accessible and quality social services, including health and education which themselves are essential for developing a heathy and skilled labour force on which growth depends and thrives.

Solomon Islands needs to respond effectively to climate change and the increasing frequency of storm surges and floods. It needs to effectively manage the environment and the risks of natural disasters, improving preparedness and increasing mitigation activities; this cuts across the three objectives noted above. Similarly, improved governance, national unity, public order and safety are essential for a stable environment within which the economy can grow and people’s livelihoods and wellbeing improve.

2.2 Structure of the NDS and the planning system

The structure of the NDS and the planning process is presented schematically in the figure below. It shows the links between the longer term strategic framework of the NDS, medium term strategies included in sector and provincial development plans and ministry corporate plans, and more immediate programs and projects included in the medium term development plan (MTDP) and the annual development budget.

The NDS provides the overall twenty year strategic framework to guide planning. It includes more immediate medium term development strategies that are designed to achieve the NDS Objectives. These medium term strategies and priorities are translated into implementable policies, programs and projects through the MTDP, which is a rolling five year plan comprising development programs and projects. In turn, these projects are included in annual development budgets. The MTDP identifies priority policies, programs and projects consistent with the DCC Policy Statement and Translation Document.

Figure 1:Structure of the NDS and Planning Process

2.3 Medium Term Strategies and Priorities

The medium term priorities for the MTDP are drawn from the medium term strategies and priorities included in the draft NDS 2016-2035. The rationale for these is summarised in section 3 below which sets out programs and projects included in the MTDP 2016-2020 and 2016 development budget.

NDS Objective One: Sustained and inclusive economic growth

Medium Term Strategy 1: Reinvigorate and increase the rate of economic growth

Medium Term Strategy 2: Improve the environment for private sector development and increase investment opportunities for all Solomon Islanders

Medium Term Strategy 3: Build and upgrade physical infrastructure and utilities with an emphasis on access to productive resources and markets, and to ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services

Medium Term Strategy 4: Strengthen land reform and other programs to encourage economic development in urban, rural and customary lands

NDS Objective Two: Poverty alleviated across the whole of the Solomon Islands, basic needs addressed and food security improved; benefits of development more equitably distributed

Medium Term Strategy 5: Alleviate poverty, improve provision of basic needs and increase food security.

Medium Term Strategy 6: increase employment opportunities and improve the livelihoods of all Solomon Islanders

Medium Term Strategy 7: support the disadvantaged and the vulnerable and; improve gender equality

NDS Objective Three: All Solomon Islanders have access to quality social services, including education and health

Medium Term Strategy 8: Ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to quality health care and; combat communicable and non-communicable diseases

Medium Term Strategy 9: Ensure all Solomon Islanders can access quality education and the nation’s manpower needs are sustainably met

NDS Objective Four: Resilient and environmentally sustainable development with effective disaster risk management

Medium Term Strategy 10: Improve disaster risk management, mitigation and preparedness

Medium Term Strategy 11: Manage the environment in a sustainable resilient way and effectively respond to climate change

NDS Objective Five: Unified nation with stable and effective governance and public order

Medium Term Strategy 12: Efficient and effective public service with a sound corporate culture

Medium Term Strategy 13: Reduce corruption and improve governance at national, provincial and community levels

Medium Term Strategy 14: Improve national unity, peace and stability at all levels

Medium Term Strategy 15: Improve national security, law and order and foreign relations

2.4 2016 Development Budget Strategy

The MTDP 2016 templates for on-going and new MTDP programmes, based on the revised templates of 2014, were discussed by MDPAC with line ministries in refresher workshops held in June 2015. Launch of the Budget Strategy for 2016 was delayed until 22 July 2015. The workshops, nonetheless, had emphasised ministries should not delay in developing realistic proposals for 2016, which could be accommodated within the likely available SIG resources. Unfortunately most Ministry budget proposals were still not submitted in a timely manner, seriously undermining the MDPAC and MOFT process for effective scrutiny of proposals, and consultative feedback and amendment.

The strategy for the 2016 budget is set out in the Financial Circular published on 22 July 2015 in accordance with Part 6 of the Public Financial Management Act 2013 (preparation of the annual budget). This is informed for the first time by the inclusion of a Medium Term Fiscal Outlook, as required also under the PFM Act. The economic outlook for 2016 makes it clear that delivering the DCC Government’s policy priorities will require a genuine effort to refocus existing baseline spending and to review the relevance of development projects. The Government will only support new bids in 2016 that align with the National Development Strategy 2016-2035, the DCC Policy Statement and Translation document and deliver on the Government’s agenda, as summarised in 2.3 above. The Government remains committed to pursuing its sectoral reform programmes which include reforms in the economic and finance sector, productive sector, development sector, resource sector and social sector.

The Financial Circular notes that with revenue expected to grow by 3 per cent, expenditure on both the recurrent and the development budget should remain similar to 2015 planned levels. Any new programmes proposed by ministries must be accommodated within this.

A major objective of the reforms of the PFM Act and planning processes is to improve the quality of resource allocation decisions. The MTDP templates provide headings for the ministries to justify their responses to the Government’s financial constraints in terms of rescheduling and re-scoping programme activities to fit within the development budget ceilings. MDPAC and MOFT have emphasised the need for each Ministry to prioritise its programmes and activities and not leave central agencies to make necessary changes to stay within ceilings. Line ministries are the technical experts on their ministry’s subject matter and they are best placed to make informed decisions on priorities and necessary choices between alternatives under constrained resources. In 2014 and 2015, budget bids by ministries exceeded the available development budget, line ministries evading their responsibilities for managing their sector.

Figure 2 below summarises the budget allocations to the ministries for 2014 and 2015 and the proposed budget allocations for 2016. Some of the ministries budget allocation for 2016 are reduced compared to their allocation in 2015 whilst certain ministries have increased allocations. Most Ministries maintained at the 2015 level.

Figure 2.Line Ministry 2016 Development Proposals for SIG Funding Compared to 2014 and 2015 Budgets1

The allocations to ministries are attributed to both ongoing and new programmes in the Development Budget. This therefore demonstrates the DCC Government’s priorities in infrastructure development, natural resource utilization and management, improvement of the economic sector and productive sector, enhancement of the national security and the implementation of the fundamental and sectoral reforms programmes in governance, economic productive and social services.

3 Programmes Supporting Government Medium Term Strategies and Priorities

Figure 3 below presents a matrix linking each of the proposed MTDP 2016 – 2020 programmes to the NDS Objectives and the Medium Term Strategies and Priorities.

Figure 3.NDS Objectives and MTDP Priority Programs and Projects

The programmes are summarised in this section under each Medium Term Strategy. The details of each project are available separately in the individual MTDP templates, the development costs being summarised in an Excel spreadsheet which forms the basis of the Development Estimates included as Ledger 4 in the Budget Estimates. The MTDP templates include: (i) Programme Frameworks – these set out the Impact in relation to NDS Objectives and MTDSs, the Outcome of the programme with the rationale of how proposed Inputs, and the Activities and Outputs designed to achieve the Outcome and contribute to the NDS Objective. Each framework specifies monitorable indicators as the basis for Monitoring and Evaluation; and (ii) Development Costs - these set out the multi-year costs for the MTDP period 2016-2020. The development programme costs are broken down into the Chart of Accounts and have been reflected in the 2016 Development Budget.

These two MTDP templates are the core of the planning templates, and also include descriptions of the proposal, analysis of the assumptions in the Framework, Implementation Schedules, Incremental Recurrent Costs, Procurement Plans and TA Schedule. These will help ensure that programmes are ready for implementation to enable maximum use of the finance provided. The templates provide the basis for objective appraisal and comparison of proposals in terms of rates of return and cost effectiveness as required in the Public Financial Management Act 2013. The multi-year schedules also provide the basis for forward estimates.

3.1 Sustained and Inclusive Economic Growth

A return to economic growth and continued sustainable and inclusive economic and social development will provide the economic and social capital that will enable the improvement in the economic and social wellbeing of all Solomon Islanders. Sustainable and inclusive growth is seen as the key to long term development, necessary for the alleviation and prevention of poverty, provide for basic needs, and improve food security, particularly in the rural areas of the Solomon Islands, and for the provision of adequate, accessible and quality social services.

This requires improvements in economic and financial management and reforms, and development of the private sector. A key strategy is to develop economic growth centres and rural growth centres. The productive and resource sectors need reinvigorating to increase value added and export earnings, and to achieve sustained growth. Development of agriculture, fisheries, forestry, minerals and tourism are key. Infrastructure facilities and utilities to support growth in the productive sectors are a priority. Rural and customary land need to be made available for commercial and agricultural development. Skills of the working population need to be improved.

3.1.1 Economic Growth

Economic and finance sector: Economic stability is needed as a platform for growth. Improvements are needed in economic and financial management, and accountability. National fiscal and monetary policies should facilitate growth. There is a need to create a vibrant and robust economic environment to stimulate growth and investment; private sector led development will be key (MTS 2 below).

Productive sectors: development of the productive sectors is a key element to reinvigorate growth. The agriculture sector is the most important sector for the Solomon Islands national economy. It provides for and sustains 85 per cent of the rural population with food crops, cash crops and livestock for their daily livelihoods, food and social security. Agricultural exports are a major source of export earnings. Enhanced production of staple foods is essential for food security and the wellbeing of the rural population, but a twin track strategy includes the development of commercial agriculture and exports as key to growth. There is a large potential to increase production and export from large-scale plantations. The livestock sector is underdeveloped and domestic production does not meet consumption; the domestic industry is mostly back-yard production, and production could be increased through better animal husbandry and feeding practices, and improved breeds.

Fisheries: offshore and coastal fisheries are both important. Offshore fisheries provide an important source of foreign exchange earnings, and possibilities for expanded on-shore processing and canning of tuna. Coastal and on-shore fisheries, including aquaculture, are important for alleviating poverty, improving food security and providing greater benefits and opportunities to improve the lives of Solomon Islanders (NDS objective two). Sustainability of the resource is essential. Over-fishing and illegal and unregulated fishing are threatening the resource.

Tourism: the tourism sector is currently small and has underperformed in terms of growth but could play an increasingly important role in the economy, increasing foreign exchange earnings and providing direct income and employment.

Resources Sector: the forestry sector currently provides more than half of GDP and a significant proportion of export earnings. However the resource is not sustainable at current extraction rates and value added is minimal. More emphasis is needed on reforestation and plantation development and on downstream processing and value adding.

The projects and programs listed below all contribute towards encouraging and sustaining economic growth. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP. The first 13 projects below are all targeted at increasing agricultural production. Some also focus on livelihoods improvements and food security at the community level and are thus also included in figs 8 and/or 9 below under NDS Objective 2. The fisheries projects listed similarly contribute to both objectives. Tourism provides new opportunities for growth, as summarised in the Appendix. Forestry and mining sector remain important sources of economic activity, but sustainability is a concern.

Figure 4.Programmes and projects encouraging reinvigoration of sustainable economic growth

3.1.2 Private Sector Growth and Increased Opportunities for Solomon Islanders

The private sector is now seen as the principal driver of growth, which has been slow partly as a result of lack of diversification into other productive enterprises outside the resource sector, under investment, and the high cost of doing business. There is a need to improve the institutional and enabling environment for private sector growth, including institutional infrastructure, policies and other legislation. Access to financial services need to be improved with a broader range of financial services being available. The transparency of the legislative and policy environment needs to be enhanced; land and tax policies need to be clearer. Foreign investment policy also needs to be clear, with including any investment protection policies and treaties. Economic growth centers are seen as a priority implementation activity.

The projects and programs listed below contribute towards encouraging and sustaining economic growth through improving the environment for private sector development. Economic growth centers in particular are a key priority of the government. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 5.Programmes improving the environment for private sector development and increased opportunities for Solomon Islanders

3.1.3 Infrastructure and Utilities

Infrastructure plays a critical role in achieving the objectives of the NDS. However infrastructure needs in the Solomon Islands are great and given limited resources, priority should be given initially to those investments that are targeted at initiatives in key productive sectors. A national infrastructure investment plan (NIIP) has been prepared and revised to highlight such key priority investments over the next 5-10 years. Investments in the Provinces are needed also to meet needs of the population (NDS objective two) but these should be considered in the context of such provincial and rural needs, with the NIIP focusing on key national infrastructure projects focused on reinvigorating economic growth.

Access to key utilities is also an essential factor in both economic growth and meeting the needs of the people The continuous reforms of the Solomon Water, SIEA, Ports Authority and other authorities pave the way of improving and providing effective and efficient services and ensuring proper management of the organisation.

The importance of maintenance should not be overlooked. Infrastructure investments need to be sustainable, and be resilient to natural disasters and; design must take into account the potential impacts of climate change.

The projects and programs listed below are key infrastructure and utility projects on which growth depends. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP. Development Partners contribute significantly to some projects, as shown in figs 20 and 22 below.

Figure 6.Programmes targeting improved Infrastructure and Utilities

3.1.4 Land Reform and Increased use of Rural and Customary Lands

Many government development projects and private sector initiatives are constrained by the need to obtain land, whether by purchase or leasehold. There is a lot of unproductive and unused land in both urban and rural areas, including customary land, which could be more productively used. Policy changes and land reform efforts need to be enhanced to help remove land as an obstacle to development and allow land owners to share in the benefits of development. Customary land reform remains an issue that the government is still trying to solve. Analysis is being conducted on how land owned by land owners can be utilized by private sector, government, donors and others; how it can be sold, leased or occupied through proper, transparent and appropriate prices and possible regulations; and the processes of land agreement appicable to various communities in the provinces. Current approaches and policies will not solve all problems, but will assist in developing appropriate land valuation and land market prices. Availability of land for housing is an equally pressing problem.

The three projects and programs listed below address issues relating to urban and semi-urban land management, governance, planning and development are key to helping remove constraints to development, increasing availability of land, improving institutional and legislative capacity, and improving the planning process. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP. However, additional policies and programs are needed to address availability and usage of rural and customary lands.

Figure 7.Programmes Improving Land Use

3.2 Poverty Alleviation, Basic Needs, Food Security

The NDS 2011-2020 prioritised alleviation of poverty and improvements in the lives of all Solomon Islanders, particularly in rural areas. This remains a priority, but economic growth is needed to provide the resources to meet this objective. Basic needs such as provision of essential services including water, sanitation and public health services, and social and community development will improve the social wellbeing of all Solomon Islanders. Increase efforts will be directed at poverty alleviation, improved food security, food safety and nutrition, and increased diversification of employment and livelihoods.

3.2.1 Poverty Alleviation, Food Security, Basic needs

The projects and programs listed in fig 8 below include several projects targeted specifically at increasing food supply to improve food security, and increasing livelihood opportunities for those in rural areas. These latter programs are also shown in fig 9, covering improved employment and livelihoods. Public health and water supply programs providing basic needs are also important activities in achieving this objective. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 8.Programmes Impacting on Poverty, Food Security and Basic Needs

3.2.2 Increased Employment and Improved Livelihoods

Increasing employment opportunities and improving livelihoods is important to help ensure a more equitable distribution of benefits across the Solomon Islands. This includes generating jobs and increasing employment opportunities for the growing population across all Provinces, improving rural livelihoods and the wealth of all Solomon Islanders, and promoting agricultural services to support small scale farmers.

The projects and programs listed below are targeted at increasing livelihood and employment opportunities in rural areas. They include a program specifically targeting rural growth centers, a key priority of the current government. Projects provide support to farmers to open up their land to the niche market products. They provide incentives to assist farmers to venture or develop the niche products for local consumption and export for the demand of international and domestic users. Such incentives provide livelihood for the people - income generating activities. They also encourages farmers to look into new tools, equipment and crops that increase the yield of their crops and enables better productivity of their land and resources, encouraging innovation and promoting awareness and understanding on quality control of goods that could be exported domestically and internationally. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 9.Programmes Impacting on Employment and Livelihoods

3.2.3 Support for the Disadvantaged and Vulnerable, Women and Youth

Development should benefit all the people of Solomon Islands, and SDG emphasise the importance of including the disadvantaged, including the disabled and other vulnerable groups. The drift of the population from rural to urban areas and the increasing number of unemployed youths is creating tensions that could undermine the improvements in social cohesion and security in the past few years. The role and place of women in society is an essential element of any country and promoting gender equality and empowering women was a critical MDG and remains so as SDG.

The projects and programs listed below include programs addressing concerns of the youth and women and children. The sports development program will provide greater opportunities for youths to gainfully use their time, and improve their health and welfare. The national centers similarly provide opportunities for women and others to get together, and learn about and develop employment opportunities. These programs are combined with policies for more equitable involvement in development. No specific programs are currently in process targeting other disadvantaged groups, but NGOs are increasingly involved in this. Protection and understanding of cultural concerns is included here as part of the museum and archives portfolio, preservation of culture being seen as important for people’s wellbeing. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 10.Programmes Impacting on the Disadvantaged and Vulnerable

3.3 Access to Quality Social Services

3.3.1 Health and Medical Services

Access to quality health and medical services and to quality education is essential for the wellbeing of all Solomon Islanders. Development needs a healthy population with an education that can meet the needs of a growing country. The Ministry of Health and Medical Services is developing a new sector strategy –stressing that the quest for health goes beyond fighting disease, reducing sickness, preventing the loss of young lives and relieving suffering. The vision for health is to contribute to the wellbeing of all the Solomon Islands people. The overall goal is to achieve universal health coverage. This means that all people can access use of the preventive, curative, rehabilitative and palliative health services they need and which the country can afford, and that they are of sufficient quality to be effective. At the same time, it ensures that the use of these services does not expose the community to financial hardship. Sustainability of services and whether charges should be introduced/increased needs to be examined.

Priority health issues being targeted include: (i) improved child survival; (ii) improved maternal health; (iii) improved health and wellbeing of youth and adolescents; (iv) reduced incidence of non-communicable diseases and impacts; and (v) reduced burden of communicable diseases.

Enhanced access to and delivery of public health services and interventions is the second key priority area. Six key objectives for implementation have been identified: (i) strengthen Healthy Village initiative as a priority; (ii) strengthen collaboration with all stakeholders and partners to expand the reach of quality health services and public health initiatives; (iii) expand partnerships with resource developers, private health care providers, churches and NGOs across all provinces; (iv) improve affordable access to quality health services and interventions for priority critical reference groups and individuals; (v) improve support for coverage; and (vi) all facilities delivering universal health coverage service packages and interventions are adequately resourced.

Improvement of the quality and support of health services is essential, with an emphasis on effectively spending resources: (i) improved quality and support of health services: (ii) strengthened health systems and governance; and (iii) better preparedness for disasters, outbreaks and emerging population health issues.

The relocation of NRH is a high priority, while other medium term priorities include rehabilitating, reconstruction and construction of new medical infrastructures in rural and urban centres.

The projects and programs listed below include several ongoing programs essential for delivering on the new strategy, with some reorientation within programs. The relocation of the National Referral Hospital is seen as a key government priority. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP. Development Partners contribute significantly to some health sector projects, including both budgetary support and individual projects, as shown in figs 20 and 22 below.

Figure 11.Programmes Impacting on Health and Medical Services

3.3.2 Education and Human Resource Development

The Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development is developing a new education sector strategy. The draft proposes three strategic goals:

  • achieve equitable access to education for all Solomon Islanders;
  • improve the quality of education in Solomon Islands; and
  • manage and monitor resources efficiently and cost effectively.

The draft strategy includes several specific objectives and targets for 2030: achievement of minimum proficiency standards in reading and mathematics; completion rates; access to quality early childhood development, care and pre-primary education; equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university; number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship; elimination of gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations; adult literacy and numeracy skills.

The projects and programs listed below include several ongoing programs essential for delivering on the new strategy, with some reorientation within programs. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP. Development Partners contribute significantly to the education sector, including both budgetary support and individual projects, as shown in figs 20 and 22 below.

Figure 12.Programmes Impacting on Education and Human Resource Development

3.4 Resilient and Environmentally Sustainable Development

3.4.1 Disaster Risk Management, Mitigation and Preparedness

Solomon Islands needs to respond effectively to climate change and the increasing frequency of storm surges and floods. It needs to effectively manage the environment and the risks of natural disasters, and this cuts across the three objectives noted above. An increased emphasis on disaster risk preparedness and on efforts focused on disaster risk mitigation are immediate priorities.

The projects and programs listed below are ongoing projects that focus on improved disaster risk management and disaster response. While the SIMS program targets early warning of oncoming typhoons, other disasters such earthquakes are not yet easy to predict, although early warning systems for tsunamis generated by underwater earthquakes have improved. As noted above, more needs to be done on disaster preparedness. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP. Regional Partners contribute significantly to some environment projects, as shown in figs 20 and 22 below.

Figure 13.Programmes Impacting on Disaster Risk Management and Mitigation

3.4.2 Environmentally Resilient Development and effective Response to Climate Change

Increased efforts are needed to effectively develop and manage the environment sustainably and in the longer term, and be responsive to, and increase efforts directed at, climate change mitigation and adaptation. The Ministry of Agriculture and livestock will make an important contribution to both these strategies through: (i) shielding farmers from impacts of natural disasters and climate change through disaster and risk management and climate change mitigation; (ii) enhancing soil conservation and management; (iii) improving land fertility and productivity, and land use planning; and (iv) enforcing the regulatory framework.

The projects and programs listed below are ongoing projects that focus on responding to future climate change and other environmental concerns, including improving the government’s capacity to support integration of environmental issues into projects, making physical investments more resilient to climatic changes. Recent floods have emphasised the need for such resilient development. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP. Regional Partners contribute significantly to some environment projects, as shown in figs 20 and 22 below.

Figure 14.Programmes Impacting on resilient development and response to climate change

3.5 Unified Nation with Stable and Effective Governance and Public Order

Good governance at national, provincial and community levels, including maintenance of law and order, is essential for achieving a better future and achieving the full potential of the country. Improved governance cuts across all the NDS objectives and has many facets. It is an essential enabling environment for development and social cohesion and wellbeing. The RAMSI support has helped improve security and law and order, and has also strengthened government accountability, efficiency and effectiveness. More needs doing however, and a sound corporate culture needs to be instilled within and outside the public service to reduce and eventually eradicate corruption, which is holding back development. The 4 medium term strategies set out below to achieve this objective are mostly interrelated, and work as a whole in meeting this objective.

3.5.1 Efficient and Effective Public Service

Several ministries, including the MPS, have programs targeted at improving the working and living environment of public servants through improvements in office accommodation and housing, as set out in fig 15 below. Increased housing is a concern raised by almost all ministries, but provision of housing, while important for improving staff morale and wellbeing, must be balanced with the need to focus on reinvigorating economic growth. Improvements in the efficiency and effectiveness of the public service are also very dependent on policies and codes of conduct that should help develop an improved corporate culture. The programs included in fig 16 below on improved governance also impact on this strategy. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of each project and program, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 15.Programmes Impacting on Efficiency and Effectiveness of Public Service

3.5.2 Eradication of Corruption and Improved Governance

The PMO reform program shown below includes components to address corruption (an Anti-corruption Act is being prepared and targeted for implementation in 2016), and consultations on a new national constitution. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of these two programs, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 16:Programmes Impacting on Corruption and Good Governance

3.5.3 Improved National Unity, Peace and Stability

Several programs are listed below that target improvements in national unity and peace and stability. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of these programs, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 17:Programmes Impacting National Unity, Peace and Stability

3.5.4 National Security, Law and Order, and Foreign Relations

Public order and safety are key for stability and growth. Each of the three ministries implementing on-going programmes under the Public Order and Safety priority has made proposals for continuation of the activities. Each programme involves construction of office, court, station facilities and staff housing. The Appendix to this MTDP provides summary details of these three programs, drawn from the programme framework included in the line Ministry submission for the 2016 budget and MTDP.

Figure 18:Programmes Impacting on National Security, Law and Order, and Foreign Relations

4. Development Expenditure

4.1 SIG Funded Development Expenditure

The SIG development budget for 2016 is higher than the 2014 levels and slightly surpasses 2015 baseline planning level by 0.23 percent. This is due mainly to the ongoing programmes and the expansion of the programmes as these include programmes and activities stipulated in the DCC Government Policy Statement and Policy Strategy and Translation documents.

Figure 19:2016 Bids for SIG Development Funds

SIG total recommended allocation in the 2016 Appropriated Development Budget is SBD 1,143,927,137. This total proposed budget also includes RoC Support to constituency development SBD 70 Million under Head 498, EU Support to RWASH Programme under Head476 and DFAT support of SBD 4,160,000 million under Head 373. Moreover, development partners provide budget support to assist in the 2016 Recurrent Budget.

Figure 20:Total 2016 Development Budget, Budget Support and Non Appropriated Assistance- All Sources

3.6 Development Partner Funded Development Expenditure

The 2014 Development Budget provided SBD 921 million of non-appropriated donor development activities. Review of the data suggests SBD 161 million of this was double counting. Other errors were not so simply checked. Hence, it is inappropriate and inaccurate to suggest an actual level of donor development support. The donor funds indicated to MDPAC by ministry and by programme are likely to be a significant under-estimate of such funding.

The data was supplied in response to requests to both donor and line ministry to report expected levels of support. Some data were supplied directly to MDPAC by NZAID, UNDP and WHO with data broken down into the Chart of Accounts in the templates supplied by MDPAC. EU totals were provided by EU in their template and breakdown. Other data on donor funding including on AusAID/DFAT, JICA, GEF, ADB and WB had been supplied by the line ministries. Others provided data in the required Chart of Accounts breakdown while others such as the NTF in MID, provided the data as lump sums.

Despite the incompleteness of the data, this is a first significant step on the Public Financial Management Reform Roadmap to bring such funding into line with SIG policies and within the SIG planning processes of MDPAC and the MTDP.

Figure 21:SIG Development Expenditure by Programme and Ministry

Figure 22:Development Partner Development Expenditure by Programme and Ministry

4 MTDP in the Public Financial Management Reform Roadmap

The Public Financial Management Act of 2013 became effective in January 2014 and represents a series of major reforms in Solomon Islands’ public financial management. Included within the reforms are requirements for planning processes, centred on the Medium Term Development Plan, to play a more effective, coordinated role in the governments financial decision making processes. The PFM was promoted by MOFT but concerns all line ministries, including MDPAC in particular. The respective roles and responsibilities of MOFT and MDPAC need review.

To support the implementation of the Act, a Public Financial Management Reform Roadmap for the period July 2014 to June 2017 was published by MoFT in June 2014. The core reforms in planning and development budget processes are set out in the Roadmap extract in 5.5 and matrix 3.4 below. Recognizing long term public investment as a major source of economic growth and social development, the Roadmap intends the MTDP to become SIG’s central multi-year planning document.

Matrix 3.4.Integration of recurrent and development budget
Our aim: Strengthen the integration between the recurrent and development budget to raise the quality of expenditure
Lead implementing agency: Ministry of Development Planning and Aid Coordination
Our actions:PrioritiesBy whom?By when?
To implement the requirements of the PFM Act:
3.4.01 Table in Parliament the MTDP at least 3 months before the start of the financial year (PFM Act S45 (2) which need to be consistent to the budget and fiscal strategies.HighMDPACBy September 2014
3.4.02 Develop regulations to support the MTDP and its implementation (PFM Act S45 (2)).HighMDPACBy September 2014
To integrate the recurrent with the development budget:
3.4.03 Review budget process on both recurrent and development budget to strengthen coordination and promote greater integration (PEFA). The development expenditure is critical for economic growth and social development:
  • MOFT and MDPAC to undertake joint budget consultations to share information
  • Determine the funding envelope of the development budget early in the budget timetable to allow prioritization to be done effectively with LMs
  • Promote close liaisons of counterpart sectoral officers in MOFT and MDPAC to coordinate recurrent and development budgets
  • Clarify definition of recurrent and development
HighMDPAC/BudgetBy July 2014
3.4.04 Include recurrent costs of projects in recurrent budget (PEFA). These costs are identified by the current development budget template. It needs to filter into the recurrent budget for the life of the projects.HighMDPAC/BudgetBy July 2014
3.4.05 Include development expenditure strategy in the budget strategy paper. The development budget has the most impact on economic growth and social development. Its profile and priority in the budget need to be lifted in the fiscal and national strategic documents.HighMDPAC/BudgetTo include in the July 2014 Budget Strategy and subsequent strategies
3.4.06 Make the development budget an integral part of midyear budget review to enable MDPAC to assess and discuss with LMs the rate of implementation of the development budgetHighMDPAC/BudgetJuly 2014
3.4.07 Reconcile differences between the development budget and recurrent budget (PEFA):
  • Payment of wages and salaries of program staff
  • Require project proposals to the tender boards and Cabinet to include assessment of the capacity of LMs to implement the project
  • MDPAC to be more assertive in pushing the rate of project implementation in LMs
HighMDPAC/BudgetBy 2015 budget
3.4.08 Integrate the development and recurrent budget and have one unified budget estimates (PEFA)LowMDPAC/BudgetBy 2017 budget
3.4.09 Reduce the underspending of the development budget (PEFA):
  • Better match allocation of development expenditure to implementation capacity of LMs
  • Facilitate access to funding at MOFT during the year
HighMDPAC/Budget/TreasuryOn going
To strengthen multiyear budget projections:
3.4.10 Adopt MTDP as the main planning instrument for development budget:
  • Discuss with donors to fill the gap between funding available and the list of projects in the MTDP
  • Strengthen the link between the MDPAC and corporate plans of LM, sector policies and the budget (specific?)
  • Undertake awareness of LMs on the linkages of the NDS, MTDP and compliance to development budget procedures
  • Update MTDP yearly to carry forward those not funded in particular year
  • Undertake training of LMs on the link between development and recurrent budgets
  • Clarify the link between MTDP and MTEF
HighMDPAC/Budget/LMsBy end 2016
3.4.11 Improve multiyear development planning through the MTEF (PEFA) and the linkages between MTEF and MTDP.LowMDPAC2016
3.4.12 Undertake awareness program to improve the understanding of the importance of development budget in the economy and the budget processes (integrate with the Roadmap awareness and ownership program).HighMDPAC/FMSSIn line with awareness & ownership program
To strengthen alignment and reporting of donor assistance:
3.4.13 Strengthen alignment of donor assistance to the MTDP through donor policies and SIG strategies. This linkage has been weak with donors dictating their areas of assistance. Donors go directly to LMs and offer assistance in their chosen area rather than linking into the MTDP.HighMDPACOn going
3.4.14 Progressively reduce donor funding that are not appropriated by Parliament:
  • Improve the accuracy of forward estimates
  • Align forward estimates with the requirement of the PFM Act and definition of public funds
MediumMDPACOn going
3.4.15 Increase the use of national systems by development partners as confidence in the development budget management increases (PEFA).MediumMDPACOn going
3.4.16 Require development partners to provide multiyear allocation of assistance according to budget classification and to address different financial years of donors (PEFA).MediumMDPACBy end 2016
3.4.17 Development partners to provide report to MDPAC twice a year on an agreed template (PEFA).MediumMDPACBy end 2016

The Act requires that the MTDP be tabled in Parliament before the end of September each year, a deadline which has guided the preparation of the 2016 MTDP, despite the delayed budget launch. The Roadmap aims for coordination of the MTDP, fiscal and budget strategies, which should be “published at the same time”, in practice by the end of June. This has not been possible in 2015 due to the changes in Government and delayed budget preparation process. However it is planned that in 2016, MTDP preparation will be brought forward, with initial preparation activities commencing in March - this should enable a draft MTDP to be published with the Budget Strategy and Operational Rules, which can thus include a development budget strategy. An updated final MTDP could then be published and tabled in Parliament in September. Line Ministry proposals would be needed no later than the end of May.

The Roadmap intends to strengthen the links between the MTDP and corporate plans and sector policies as well as the budget and MTEF documents. At present, the partial implementation of MTDP processes produces an expenditure oriented document with more detailed presentation of the use of the funds and the intended outcomes than the other documents. The distinct contribution which planning should provide is a benefit orientation to compare with the expenditures and assess the cost effectiveness and returns to each programme. In this way planning more effectively contributes to the budget processes and resource allocation decisions. To fulfil its role, the MTDP processes need to complete their intended scope to include appraisal of proposals.

The following sections discuss the present status and Roadmap required development under each of the subheadings of the Roadmap Matrix 3.4.

4.1 Implementing the requirements of the PFM Act

In this first year under the Act, MDPAC should have completed MTDP preparation so that the MTDP can be tabled in Parliament before the dissolution of the 8th Parliament Meeting. The Act specified requirement of at least 3 months before the start of the new financial year. Line Ministries, however, have not submitted budget proposals in a timely fashion, which is substantially undermining the MTDP process and reducing its effectiveness. This must be addressed.

The Roadmap, at 3.4.01, also intends that the MTDP be consistent with budget and fiscal strategies and this MTDP strives to meets this requirement particularly in the application of the Budget Strategy’s bid ceiling, ministry by ministry.

At 3.4.02, the Roadmap indicates the need to develop regulations to support the MTDP and development budget. The non-response of several agencies to the request for updated MTDP’s and the non-compliance by some ministries with the MDPAC and MoFT required bid ceilings, indicates the need for such regulations as well as for enforcement of such requirements as responsible bids in order to give credibility to the process.

4.2 Integrating the recurrent with the development budget

MDPAC’s recent planning and budget reforms have included the conversion of development budget bids from lump sums to the Chart of Accounts breakdown shared with recurrent budgets and in the MTDP templates, required proposals to indicate the incremental recurrent costs resulting from programme implementation.

Item 3.4.03 proposes greater consultation and coordination between MDPAC and MoFT in budget preparation, continuing the developments already begun. The effective coordination of development and recurrent budgets will require changes by all ministries rather than MDPAC and MoFT alone, and this may take some time to effectively achieve.

3.4.03 also highlights the need for a clear definition of “development” and “recurrent” and 3.4.07 raises the specific issue of payments to programme staff. Many of the costs proposed for the development budget appear to be recurrent in nature whilst many asset purchases - housing, offices, IT - are clearly capital expenditures but are tenuously linked to “development”. Definition may be difficult but is needed to support consistent, objective decisions on allocation of resources, as in the MTDP, and is necessary to give effective control of recurrent expenditures.

The MTDP’s inclusion of projected incremental recurrent costs is not simply to support MTEF and budget projections but is a necessary input to the intended appraisal process involving cash flow analysis to determine cost effectiveness and rates of return. However much more training is required to achieve this, and simplified templates need to be developed.

4.3 Strengthening multiyear budget projections

The origin of the MTDP in the NDS is to create a link between NDS strategic objectives and allocation of resources to activities which contribute to achievement of the national objectives. The MTDP process has focused on linking planning and budget processes but to be fully effective in aligning activities to serve national objectives it is necessary that the MTDP and MDPAC planning also be closely involved with the corporate and sectoral planning processes, as proposed in item 3.4.10 in the Roadmap.

Whilst the budget process is primarily an annual cycle the NDS, MTDP, corporate plans and sectoral policies and plans are all multi-year. Indeed, significant development expenditures are multi-year and can be seriously delayed and benefits forgone due to irregularity and uncertainty in available annual funds. The MTDP, therefore, needs to be a link between multi-year plans and annual budget process in order to strengthen multi-year budget projections and support development of the MTEF, as intended at 3.4.11.

Probably influenced by the annual budget cycle several multi-year investment programmes seem to be planned on an annual basis so that their MTDP proposals are actually a single year from an on-going programme. This is the case with clearly multi-year programmes including: MID’s Rural Transport Infrastructure, MPNS Infrastructure, MCILI’s Private Sector and MSME Development, MCA’s International and Provincial Airports Programmes, and both of MMERE’s Renewable Energy Programmes. It would be impossible to appraise proposals in the absence of full development costs and the incremental recurrent costs.

Multi-year planning and budgeting require complete data on a proposal and the rejection of proposals with incomplete information - probably supported by regulations.

An incentive to encourage Line Ministries to more seriously adopt multi-year programmatic approaches to development would be through a move to multi-year programme budgeting rather than simply projections. It would not be possible to guarantee availability of SIG funds but priority could be given on an objective basis - as has been given to on-going programmes over new bids in this MTDP. Similarly, multi-year priority could be given to provision of counterpart funds for development partner supported programmes, as with the “new” proposals by MID for support to donor programmes and by MDPAC for counterpart funds for the Rural Development Programme.

4.4 Strengthening alignment and reporting of donor assistance

At 3.4.13, the Roadmap notes that “alignment of donor assistance to the MTDP through donor policies and SIG strategies has been weak with donors dictating their areas of assistance. Donors go directly to LMs and offer assistance in their chosen area”. It is suggested “development partners provide multi-year allocation of assistance according to budget classification”.

The bypassing of central agencies is inappropriate and inconsistent with international agreements but has become a characteristic of donor behaviour which, as noted in the Roadmap, needs to be changed so that aid becomes more effective in achieving the benefits sought in national plans and strategies.

The Roadmap indicates MDPAC as the responsible agency and needs to contribute towards changed behaviour in two ways. First, completing development of a comprehensive aid coordination strategy and then implementing it in partnership with donors. Second, through the involvement of sector and planning staff in the preparation of proposed programmes to optimise their design in relation to SIG objectives and benefits to Solomon Islanders.

4.5 Roadmap Extract

This section is an unrevised quotation of section 14.3.4 in the Roadmap. As is clear, the dates proposed are no longer realistic and need to be revised.

14.3.4 Integrating the preparation, monitoring and reporting of recurrent and development budgets

Recognizing that the development budget contribute significantly to economic growth through long term public investments such as the building of physical infrastructure like roads and bridges, over recent years the contents of the development budget and its linkages to the recurrent budget have been improved to build on what has already been achieved by having MDPAC and the Budget Division in MOFT work together in the preparation, monitoring and reporting of the total SIG budget. This will include holding joint budget consultations and the determination of the development budget resources early in the budget process.

The PFM Act requires the tabling in Parliament and the publishing of the Medium Term Development Plan (MTDP) by end September every year. In this respect the MTDP which contains the list of costed projects with the fiscal and budget strategies will be tabled and published at the same time. It is the intention to make the MTDP the central multiyear planning document and link this closely with the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) which will be completed within this PFM Reform Roadmap. It is also aimed to strengthen the alignment of the donor assistance to the MTDP and improve the flow of information from development partners to help the multiyear budgeting.

Appendix: Development Programmes and Projects Proposed by Ministries

Summaries of the 2016 development budget projects, drawn from the programme frameworks, are presented below. These set out the project objectives, and anticipated outputs, outcomes and impacts. These are monitored as part of the regular Ministry and MDPAC monitoring process. This is further discussed in the NDS M&E performance Framework. Full project details are available in MDPAC, while budget details are set out in Ledger 4 of the 2016 Development Estimates, including projections for 2017- 2019.

70 Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock

70-1 Field Experimental Station and Biotechnology Infrastructure Development

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop Physical Infrastructure and Utilities to Ensure all Solomon Islanders have Access to Essential Services and Markets
  • At least 20 % of farmers in the rural areas adapting new technologies being demonstrated at the Field experimental stations by 2020.
  • 20% increase in crop production by 2020.
Outcome

Improved farmers’ access to new planting materials and new agriculture technologies to enhance food security and sustainable agriculture sector development.
  • Out scaling of 10 new crop varieties and 5 technologies by 2020.
Outputs
  • Buildings at Ringi Field Experimental Station(FES) rehabilitated
  • Plant Health diagnostic lab at Henderson PEQ area is established
  • Plant diagnostic lab built at Henderson PEQ area is fully equipped
  • Entomology Lab built under MAL building at Lata, Temotu.
  • Improved Access road to the Tenaru FES,
  • Three semi-permanent buildings for 3 research staff are constructed at Tenaru FES or another FES
  • Ringi FES completely rehabilitated by 2017
  • Plant Diagnostic Lab fully operational by 2017
  • Plant Diagnostic lab built at Henderson PEQ area is fully equipped by 2017
  • Entomology Lab built and operational by 2017.
  • 1 km of Tenaru FES access road rehabilitated by 2016.
  • 3 Research staff members residing in newly built houses at the FES by 2016.

70-2 National Food Security Enhancement Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 2, MTS 5: Alleviate Poverty, increase food security
Reduce the proportion of population below Basic Needs Poverty Line from 22.7% in 2006 to 20.1% by 2016.
Outcome

Improved level of food security.
  • Increase proportion of own food production in food consumption by households from 49% in 2006 to 52% by 2016.
  • Increased household average non-food expenditure from 40% in 2006 to 45% by 2016.
Outputs
  • Improved Food Crops Production and Support: Root Crops, Vegetables, Fruit Trees, Rice, Promotion of Locol Kaikai
  • Updated Report on National Food Security Status
  • A Five National Food Security Plan formulated and endorsed by cabinet.
  • At least 60 root crop farmers throughout the country are supported with technical advice and equipment by December 2016..
  • At least 100 vegetable farmers throughout the country are supported with technical advice and equipment by December 2016.
  • At least 50 fruit tree farmers throughout the country are supported with technical advice and equipment by December 2016.

70-3 Solomon Islands Coconut Industry Support

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 1 and Objective 2, MTS 5: Increase the Rate of Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute the Benefits of Employment and Higher Incomes
Increase in Agriculture’s contribution to GDP from 33.4% in 2012 to 40% by 2020.
Outcome

Coconut industry strengthened through rehabilitation, processing and value adding activities
  • Copra and coconut oil share of total commodity export will remain stable at 11% in 2012 to 2020 despite of the rehabilitation program.
  • Coconut rehabilitation and processing implemented at targeted sites in all provinces involving at least 2,000 households by 2020
Outputs
  • Seed gardens in the provinces rehabilitated


2. Rehabilitation and establishment of coconut based farming system

3. Processing and value adding activities established

4.Improved surveillance for possible introduction of Bogia Disease

5. Coconut Secretariat is fully resourced and operational within MAL
  • At least 2 seed gardens rehabilitated by 2015
  • At least 10 sites of coconut areas rehabilitated and number of coconut based farming system established
  • At least 4 processing and value adding units established between 2015
  • Absence of Bogia disease in the country
  • The Coconut Secretariat is resourced and continues to be operational
  • The M&E on coconut projects are completed, monitoring at the 4th quarter of each year and the evaluation at the 4th quarter 2015.

70-4 Livestock Programme (Cattle Industry)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 2, MTS 5: Alleviate Poverty and Improve the Lives of Solomon Islanders
Over 500 – 1000 families have access to income through cattle farming

Improved household performances in rural households
Outcome

Cattle industry development
  • increase number of improved breeding animals
  • Increase improved pastures and grazing areas
  • Increase commercial cattle heads
  • Increase small-holder cattle heads
  • Increase local beef production
  • Improved local beef quality
  • Increase in imported breeding cattle from 1500 heads in 2015 to 4000 heads in 2020
  • Increase available grazing area of for commercial cattle to 4000 - 5000 hectares by 2019
  • Increase local beef production to 50 tonnes per annum by 2019
  • Improve 3 x slaughter, processing and market facilities and capacities in Auki, Gizo and Honiara
  • Increase in cattle population by 40% (4500 heads) in 2020.ie imported and progenies)
Outputs
  • Isabel Commercial farm
  • MAL nucleus farm.
  • Small-holder expansion project
  • Expansions on Ilolo, Gonokukufo, Ghojoruru and Hakama
  • Processing facilities in Auki, Gizo and Honiara
  • Pasture improvement project
  • Staff training and capacity building
  • Commence development 500 hectare cattle property at Ghojoruru, Isabel.
  • Commence development of 200 hectare land for cattle research, breeding multiplication and distribution.
  • Develop or rehabilitate 165 small-holder farms on Guadalcanal (50) Malaita (50), Isabel (30), Makira (15) and Western (20).
  • Develop further 400 hectares of improved pastures handling and processing facilities on Ilolo and Ghojoruru
  • Develop, processing and marketing capacities and facilities on Auki (1), Gizo (1) and Honiara (1) including potentials at Isabel, and Makira.
  • Pasture rehabilitation and improvement program for all farms 165 small-holders and four commercial farms.
  • Training for all cattle staff in Stockmanship, animal husbandry and cattle management in regional facilities – Fiji and Vanuatu

70-5 National Bio-security Strengthening Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3. Build and Upgrade Physical Infrastructure and Utilities to Ensure that all Solomon Islanders have Access to Essential Services and to Markets.
Solomon Islands Biosecurity and inspection service workforce better equipped to assess, identifies, prevent and manage biosecurity risk and quarantine risk items at the boarder by 2018
Outcome

Safeguard SI’s animal and plant health status to maintain overseas markets and protect the economy and environment from the impact of exotic pests and diseases, through risk assessment, inspection and certification, and the implementation of emergency response arrangements for SI agricultural, food and fibre industries
Improve trade facilitation through efficient and effective pre-export, treatments, and inspection and certification procedures.
Outputs
  • Improved Border Control
  • Improved Quarantine Treatment Operations
  • Improved Quarantine Infrastructure
  • Strengthened Quarantine Trade Facilitations
  • Specialise Equipment
  • Strengthened Pest and Disease Surveillance
  • Enhanced Pest and Disease Control
  • Market Access and Trade Facilitation Strategy
  • Improved pre-export procedures
  • Internal capacity development and training
  • Percentage of vessels, passengers, cargo inspected and cleared by 2018
  • Numbers of quarantine interceptions done by 2018
  • Number of treatments and destruction recorded by 2018
  • Facilities (Staff houses & Offices) completed by 2018
  • Drainage, fencing, roads, landscaping work, signboards
  • Market access conditions for existing products updated, reviewed and implemented by 2018
  • Border inspection and laboratory equipment
  • Conduct 2 pest and disease survey per year
  • Contain and or eradicate pest through application of chemical and other pest control measures 2016
  • At least 2 consultation meeting with stakeholders in Country or out of the country to seek trade opportunities
  • Audit export pathways and facilities
  • Conduct Import Risk Assessment for plants plant product, animal, animal product
  • Revise import protocol for plants and plant product animal, animal product
  • Pre- export pathways are documented and approved
  • Induction training
  • PMP assessment training

70-6 Solomon Islands Coconut Industry Support Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 1: To increase the rate of Economic Growth and equitably distribute the benefits of employment and higher incomes amongst all the provinces and people of the Solomon Islands.
Increase in Agriculture’s contribution to GDP from 33.4% in 2012 to 40% by 2020
Outcome

Coconut industry strengthened through rehabilitation, processing and value adding activities
  • Copra and coconut oil share of total commodity export will remain stable at 11% in 2012 to 2020 despite of the rehabilitation program.
  • Coconut rehabilitation and processing implemented at targeted sites in all provinces involving at least 2,000 households by 2020
Outputs
  • Seed gardens in the provinces rehabilitated
  • Rehabilitation and establishment of coconut based farming system
  • Processing and value adding activities established
  • Improved surveillance for possible introduction of Bogia Disease
  • Coconut Secretariat is fully resourced and operational within MAL
  • Monitoring and Evaluation of coconut projects
  • Green and dry copra trading
  • At least 9 seed gardens rehabilitated between 2016-2020
  • At least 10 sites of coconut areas rehabilitated and number of coconut based farming system established between 2016-2020
  • At least 10 processing and value adding units established between 2016-2020
  • Absence of Bogia disease in the country
  • The Coconut Secretariat is resourced and continues to be operational
  • The M&E on coconut projects are completed, monitoring at the 4th quarter of each year and the evaluation at the 4th quarter 2016.
  • At least 5 trading activities per province operational by Dec 2016

70-7 National Honey Development Programme (Honey in Rural Households)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 2, MTS 5 and 6: Alleviate Poverty and Improve the Lives of Solomon Islanders in a Peaceful and Stable Society
Many rural families improve in household performances.

Increase revenue level for buyers through honey trading.

Increased cash flow at household and community level through honey sales
Outcome

Honey Industry Development
  • Increased honey production by 60% from baseline.
  • Increased family income levels through honey by 30% of basal income.
  • Prolific breeding queen bees improve genetic potential of existing bee population in general
Outputs
  • Strong apiaries and associations
  • Sturdy local suppliers of materials, tools and equipment
  • Strong buyer/market and processing sector
  • Update production, pest and disease status
  • Training sessions for trainers and farmers.
  • Information sharing and linkages
  • Formation of associations of Honey producers - 5 Association of honey producing bee keepers and over 500 apiaries producing 60 kg of honey in 2015
  • 25 Supported local suppliers of materials, tools and equipment
  • Documented update status of production, pest and disease of honey available
  • 220 training sessions for trainers and farmers 900 farmers in five years

70-8 National Cocoa Industry Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 1, and Objective 2, MTS 6: To increase the rate of Economic Growth and equitably distribute the benefits of employment and higher incomes amongst all the provinces and people of the Solomon Islands.
Increase cocoa’s contribution to GDP by 6% in 2018.

High value products from cocoa will be produced by 2018.
Outcome

Cocoa industry strengthened through rehabilitation, processing and value adding activities
Increase GDP from 1.12% in 2014 to 6% by 2018, 20,000 MT by 2020.
Outputs
  • A National Cocoa Participatory Action Research (PAR) - Integrated Pest & Disease Management (IPDM) conducted for cocoa farmers-phase 2
  • Improved genetic planting material and new technologies made available to farmers
  • Cocoa industry is protected from exotic pests and diseases
  • Cocoa Secretariat fully established & operational
  • Monitoring and evaluation system established and operational
  • Rehabilitation, Replanting and establishment of cocoa based farming system
  • Processing and value adding activities established
  • Wet and dry beans trading activities established
  • At least 29 PAR sites per selected provinces established (Phase 2) by 2016
  • At least 5 Improved planting material and New Technologies introduced and used by farmers in selected provincial sites by 2016
  • Present level of Cocoa Pod Borer (CPB) maintained (Present level Zero)
  • Cocoa secretariat Officers appointed by December 2016. The Cocoa Secretariat is resourced and operational from the 2nd Quarter of 2016
  • The M&E on cocoa projects are completed, monitoring at the 3rd quarter of each year and the evaluation at the 4th quarter 2016.
  • At least 10 sites of cocoa areas rehabilitated and Replanting number of cocoa based farming system established by 2018
  • At least 10 processing and value adding units established by 2018
  • At least 10 trading activities per province operational by 2016

70-9 Agriculture Livelihoods Improvement and Export Based Expansion Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 2, MTS 6: Alleviate Poverty and Provide Greater Benefits and opportunities to Improve the Lives of Solomon Islanders in a Peaceful and Stable Society. Objective 1, MTS 1 Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefits (NDS Objective 5)
Improved Economic Livelihoods through farmers support and increased exports by Dec 2016 from 22% to 23%
Outcome

Improved Livelihoods for urban and rural communities through equal participation in development.



Increase in foreign reserves through export of agriculture crops
  • More than 2,000 Solomon Islanders participating in economic development activities by Dec 2016.
  • Employment creation of 2,000 in rural and urban areas by Dec 2016
  • Income generated in the rural and urban areas
  • Increase in the agriculture export base.
Outputs

1. Livelihoods Improvement

1.1 Support to Highland crop farmers.

1.2 Support to women and youth farmers

1.3 Support to Youths in Agriculture

1.4 Support to Urban Farmers



2. Agriculture Export based expansion

2.1 Support to Coffee

2.2 Support to Kava farmers



3. Research and Development
  • at least 100 highland crop farmers supported by the by end of 2016.
  • at least 200 women farmers supported by the end of 2016.
  • at least 114 urban farmers supported by the by end of 2016.
  • Coffee production from 100 ha in 2013 to 160 Ha established by end of 2016
  • Kava production from 118 ha in 2013 to 158 ha of Kava farms established by the end of 2016
  • Establishment of Coffee Seed Garden in Tenaru by end of 2016
  • Establishment of Kava bulking centre at Gozoruru
  • Training of 100 staff and farmers in Coffee and kava husbandry
  • 480 livelihood project operating sustainably by end of 2016

70-10 National Oil Palm Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS1: Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefits
Development of 40,000 hectares of oil Palm plantations by 2024

Increased job opportunities for un-employed human resources from 15% to 20% in 2018 and 30% in 2024.
Outcome

The National oil Palm programme is to establish 40,000 hectares of oil palm plantations in both large scale plantations and smallholders’ plantations in Solomon Islands.
The development of Oil Palm Industry will increase from 7,000 hectares (GPPOL) to at least 15,000 hectares 50% in 2018 in other Provinces by Private Sector led.
Outputs
  • Auluta Oil Palm Project
  • Waisisi Oil Palm (include West Kwaio)
  • Vangunu Oil Palm
  • Choiseul Oil Palm
  • Makira Oil Palm
  • GPPOL- Out growers
  • Shortland Oil Palm Project
  • Infrastructure (Wharf, Roads & Bridges)
  • The Auluta Oil Palm and Waisisi Oil Palm should be engaged with Smallholders development model.
  • Vangunu Oil Palm Project should start extracting crude palm oil by 2015 for the next 10 years.
  • The expansion of out-growers to plant more seedlings from the oil palm nurseries for another 4,000 hectares within Choiseul, Western and Makira.
  • Plains out growers to continue with planting.
  • New potential site to consider as SIG owned area for development.
  • Infrastructures (Wharf, Roads & bridges) is the most important and fundamental component for the Oil palm Industry Investment.

70-11 National Agriculture Census

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 1: Reinvigorate and increase the rate of economic growth
  • Minimum set of core data, for evidence-based policy development and project monitoring and evaluation purposes available for planners and policy makers.
Outcome

Baseline data in agriculture for decision making by policy makers and the private sectors is available
  • Production data on food crops and livestock for all provinces documented
Outputs

The National Agriculture Census conducted in all provinces
  • Production data on food crops and livestock for all provinces documented

70-12 Small Livestock Industry Development Program

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS1: Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefits
Outcome
  • Poultry industry development
  • Pork industry development
  • Goat and Sheep industries development
  • Animal health laboratory and surveillance capacity development
  • Increased poultry meat (15%) and egg (10%) production at rural small-holder level
  • Increased pork production by 25% and piglets availability by 15%
  • Increase goat and sheep meat production by 10%
  • Animal health laboratory developed with completed training of laboratory manager
Outputs
  • Small livestock industries policy and strategy.
  • Village livestock research, breeding, multiplication and distribution.
  • Village livestock Farm improvement project
  • Commercial farm and out grower projects
  • Complete a Small livestock industry strategy by May 30th 2016
  • Complete 8 research and breeding and distribution centers for village livestock (1 centers per province including Honiara and 1 MAL facility))
  • Complete improvement of 16 identified lead village Livestock farms (Central 2 poultry, Guadalcanal 3 pig/poultry, Honiara 3 pig/poultry, Makira 2 pig, Malaita 4 pig/poultry and Temotu 2 pig) by October 2016
  • Complete expansion of 12 lead small-holder commercial farms (Guadalcanal 4 pig/poultry, Honiara 4 pig/poultry, Malaita 4 pig/poultry) by October 30th 2016

70-13 Extension Infrastructure

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

The project will address NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: build and upgrade Physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure that all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and to markets.
Improved extension services in the rural areas of the country
Outcome

Enhancing Extension infrastructure project to be implemented successfully without delay
Improved work output by officers in Malaita and Isabel Provinces by the end of 2016
Outputs
  • Auki and Buala Offices designed
  • Auki and Buala Agriculture Offices constructed
  • Building designs for Auki and Buala Agriculture Offices completed by 2nd Quarter 2016
  • Auki and Buala Agriculture offices constructed and completed by December 2016

71 Office of the Auditor General

71-1 Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5, MTS 13: Improve Governance and Order at National, Provincial and Community Levels and Strengthen Links at All Levels
Office of the Auditor General building is renovated to improve working environment; residence improved.
Outcome

Office of the Auditor General and individual officers able to work more effectively.

Auditor General resides in a house that is appropriate for a constitutional post holder thereby reducing accommodation costs.

SIG owned vehicles are safe and secure and flooding is reduced in Mud Alley. Staff has safe transport available for after hours travel.
  • Auditor General and staff are working in a safe and improved working environment with more space.
  • Auditor General resides is a house that is improved, safe and secure.
  • SIG/OAG vehicles are parked safely and securely both during and after working hours; and flooding is lessened in Mud Alley during heavy downpours. Staff safety is maximised thus encouraging high performance and output.
Outputs
  • Office of the Auditor General building renovated and improved.
  • Auditor General official residence refurbished and renovated
  • Office of the Auditor General Car Park improved
  • Fully renovate Auditor General official residence at Lengakiki - refurbished building, improved residence grounds, secure perimeter
  • Office renovated - waterproofing iron roofing, repainting the whole exterior, renovate and increase the interior workspace by improvements to the main auditors’ room, the training room, and corporate service offices and construct a secure registry room.
  • Redesign water drainage system, redesign car ports, build new car parks, build concrete driveway and slab, improve and demarcate front roadside parking area and put up parking signs

72 Ministry of Education and Human Resources

72-1 SICHE Transition to University Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 3, MTS 9: Ensure all Solomon Islanders can access quality education and the nation’s human resource needs are sustainably met
SINU enrolls not only students that complete high secondary education but also those already in employment. Current indications are that 50% come from high school and 50% from those already in employment.
Outcome

Transitioning SICHE into the Solomon Islands National University (SINU), so that more Solomon Islanders have easier access to the university education starting in 2013
  • Around 5,000 Students enrolled in 2014 and envisaged this should similar for 2015.
  • Also by 2015 the University will be offering at least 3 first degree programmes
Outputs
  • Standard and quality classrooms built
  • Quality courses and programmes developed
  • Quality teaching and learning resources and standards developed (to cater for diverse student learning needs)
  • Quality office and accommodation facilities built
  • Beautified and landscaped physical campus environment
  • 5 new classrooms to be built based on minimum classroom standards by 2016
  • Current courses and programmes peer-reviewed by external reviewers/or assessors and meet minimum quality assurance standards by 2016
  • Current teaching and learning resource materials meet SINU instructional design guidelines or curriculum frameworks by 2015
  • Professional development for staff is crucial. At least 10% of staff under-go training for a higher qualification each year.
  • Work environment for staff improved based on SINU office/or infrastructure standards. 3 offices will be completed by 2016.
  • The SINU Campuses (Kukum, Ranadi and Panatina) are developed based on the SINU Master Physical Plan. Full fencing of Panatina and Kukum Campus to be completed in 2014. Basic landscaping and road improvement to begin in 2015.

72-2 Education infrastructure

Design SummaryPerformance Indicators
Impact

Rehabilitate, reconstruct and build new educational infrastructures to accommodate increased enrolment of students at all levels of the education system.
Proportion of population aged 12 and older who have vocational or professional qualification increased from 1% towards 2% by 2020
Outcome

Skills and knowledge of students on secondary education practical subjects has improved.
At least 70% of secondary schools have met the MEHRD minimum standards for secondary teaching by 2017
Outputs

Rehabilitate, reconstruct and build new educational infrastructures to accommodate increased enrolment of students at all levels of the education system.
  • 15 classrooms each for 30 pupils completed by 1st September 2015

73 Ministry of Finance and Treasury

73-1 MoFT Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5, MTS 14: Improve Governance and Order at National, Provincial and Community Levels and Strengthen Links between Them
The Composite Country Performance Rating(CCPR)increased from 10.5 in 2011 to at least 13.0 before 2015
Outcome

Improved quality of PFM and budget execution, service delivery and revenue supply to Solomon Islands Government and citizens
Rating for Quality of Public Administration increased from 2.5 in 2011 to at least 3.5 before 2020
Outputs
  • Enhanced Technology infrastructure
  • Physical infrastructure enhanced
  • Key economic and social data improved
  • Key Economic, Revenue and Financial legislation and Administration Acts improved
  • Customs & Excise/ICT Acquisition-ASYCUDA Project by 2016.
  • Development and implementation of an eGovernment Framework by 2018.
  • Paradox Software and with Holding Tax on funded software purchase
  • MoFT Treasury Building completed by 2015
  • New ICTSU Building completed by 2016
  • National Statistical Development Strategy Project (NSDS) 2014-2034
  • Demographic and Health Survey completed by 2015 and disseminated by 2016.
  • Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) 2012-2013 by 2015.
  • Community Service Obligation and State Owned Enterprises Recapitalisation
  • Improved aviation services through reliable flights to targeted locations and improved infrastructures.
  • Improved radio services through reliable broadcasting coverage
  • Improved postal services through reliable services to the eight locations
  • The clear public benefit of enhancing agricultural production, and reinforcing confidence in Solomon Islands products supports CSO funding in the initial stage. This will also give CEMA the opportunity to build up confidence of the industry in the service, while there is a price incentive to do so compare with the costs of seeking product testing from overseas

74 Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade

74-1 MFAET Infrastructure Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5, Medium Term Strategy 15: Improve national security, law and order and foreign relations
Build new infrastructure that will ensure Solomon islanders have access to regional and international markets by 2020
Outcome

Strengthened relations btwn SIG and regional and international states /organizations on Bilateral and Multilateral trade arrangements
  • Increase in GDP thru Trade from 4.8% to 10% by 2021
Outputs
  • Suva Chancery Office Complex
  • New Henderson internal airport VIP Building
  • Completion of the New Suva Chancery Office complex by 2020
  • Completion of a new VIP Lounge Building at Henderson international airport by 2020

75 Office of the Governor General

75-1 Government House Improvement and Rehabilitation Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5, Medium Term Strategy 13: Reduce corruption and improve governance at national, provincial and community levels
  • The Governor-Generals office is enabled to perform the constitutional, statutory, ceremonial and public duties associated with the appointment
Outcome

The Government House has improved in the level of staff performance, through having a good and ventilated new office working space and environment. This will boost the wellbeing of those working and living inside, this hope to increasing level of quality, in service delivery to meet the government and state ceremonial obligations.
  • The Office successfully supports an increased number of major official activities as of 2014- 18, while continuing to provide effective support for the on-going official commitments from 18% to 40% by 2018
Outputs
  • Selection of the contractor after the tendering process by the MTB
  • Landscaping process of the project site by the constructor.
  • Foundation work process begins (2nd Quarter 2016)
  • Completion of the roofing and basic building structure (4th Quarter 2016)
1. Quality:

The Governor –General is satisfied as to the level of support provided and standard of household operations Management. Properties are maintained to high professional standards.

2. Quantity

Support of the Governor-General’s program of internal and external commitments

76 Ministry of Health and Medical Services

76-1 Public Health Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 3, MTS 8: ensure that all Solomon Islanders have access to quality health care and to combat Malaria/HIV, Non communicable and other diseases.
Child (<5years) mortality reduced from 23.2 per 1000 in 2009 to less than 20 by 2015 and towards 10 by 2020

Maternal mortality reduced from 93 per 100,000 live births in 2010 to less than 80 by 2015 below 70 by 2020
Outcome

The people of Solomon Islands will be healthy, happy and productive.
  • Increase number of people has direct access to Safe drinking water from 42% from 2009 to 60% by 2018.
  • Increased population have direct access to improved sanitation from 18% to 40% by 2018
Outputs
  • Communities fully triggered and aware to utilise WASH facilities
  • Vulnerable groups (Mothers, Children and the disable) have access to safe drinking water, improved sanitation and hygiene
  • Schools now have improve sanitation and access to safe drinking water and hygiene practices
  • Primary Health Facilities and General hospitals are fitted with improved sanitation and hygiene with continuous supply of safe drinking water
  • Staff housing to Health Promotion officer to AHCs level.
  • 100 Communities mobilized on the importance of wash by end of 2018
  • 50 disabled people have access to WASH program by 2018
  • 60 schools have access to WASH by 2018
  • 100% of health facilities have access to WASH program by 2018
  • At least 3 staff house build starting in 2014 to identified AHCs in the WP, Malaita and GP and roll out to the provinces

76-2 Primary Health Care Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to quality Health Care.
Improved staff Housing provided to provincial areas, and critical equipment provided to support rural services
Outcome

Universal Health Care expanded to rural areas.
Additional staff and equipment available in key areas.
Outputs
  • DCC Government priorities for AHC redevelopment
  • Provincial Staff Housing Program
Critical sites identified: AFIO, PANGOE, TINGOA, WAGINA, AVUAVU, WAISISI, MANUOPO, TAU

76-3 Secondary Health care Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to quality Health Care.
Secondary Health Care Services available in Provinces.
Outcome

Sustainable Secondary Health Care available in Provinces.
Initial planning undertaken to sustain key MHMS facilities.
Outputs
  • Kiluufi Hospital rebuilt
  • Kirakira Hospital Rebuilt
  • Tulagi upgraded to hospital as part of NRH relocation strategy.
  • Kiluufi hospital construction started by 4th qtr 2017
  • Kirakira Hospital building reconstruction started by 2017
  • Tulagi Rural health centre upgraded by 2017

76-4 Tertiary Care Services Programme (National Referral Hospital Rehabilitation Program)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 3: To ensure that all Solomon Islanders have access to quality health care and to combat Malaria/HIV, Non communicable and other diseases.
High quality Tertiary Care for all by 2018
Outcome

Quality Tertiary care accessible to all people of Solomon Islands.
Reduce the average length stay from 7 days to 4 days by 2018.
Outputs
  • NRH infrastructure upgraded and refurbished.
  • Functional staff quarters built to standard design
  • All clinical staff equipped with appropriate qualification
  • Functional Tertiary care equipment supporting services in place as defined by standards.
  • Relocation and Up-grade of National Referral Hospital
  • NRH Facilities built or upgraded to standard design or functional structure from 2016 to 2020
  • 100 standard design staff houses built or upgraded from 2016 - 2020
  • All NRH departments filled with appropriate staff with technical skills by 2016 -2020
  • NRH departments with functional equipment and providing prescribed services from 2016 - 2020
  • New NRH is built to standard design and located at safe site from 2016-2020

76-5 Water Supply & Sanitation

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to quality Health Care.
Strengthened national systems to support delivery of Health Care Services
Outcome

National distribution and monitoring systems strengthened.
Staff consolidation for Corporate Services Division due to organisational restructure.
Output

Construct and complete 40 rural community water supply throughout the Country
40 rural community water supply projects completed by 2016

76-6 Medical Supplies and Logistics Development Programme

76-7 National Program (cross cutting)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to quality Health Care.
Strengthened national systems to support delivery of Health Care Services
Outcome

National distribution and monitoring systems strengthened.
Staff consolidation for Corporate Services Division due to organisational restructure.
Outputs

MHMS HQ Redevelopment Stage 1
Efficient open plan offices for HQ, HR and Finance staff.

77 Ministry of Infrastructure Development

77-1 SIG Obligation to Transport Donor Funded Projects Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islands have access to essential services and markets
Honiara Highway in adequate (at least 3 km in fair) condition increases from 25% to 60%.Also 2 major bridges in Honiara are upgraded
Outcome

Rural Guadalcanal and Honiara population can enjoy main Honiara Highway of adequate quality, facilitating efficient and safe traffic to economic and social services, which improves livelihoods and quality of life. Upgrading of Munda Airport Road Reconstruction of wharves on selected sites throughout Solomon Islands
  • Honiara Highway in adequate (at least 3km in fair) condition increases from 25% to 60%. Also 2 major bridges in Honiara are upgraded
  • Meeting international airport required standards
  • Wharves completed and used by vessels.
Outputs

TSDP ADB/SIG ongoing funded projects at 18.5 % of total contract sum



Kukum Highway project Relocating of utilities and land acquisition



Transport Sector Flood recovery project (TSFRP)



Munda Airport upgrade
  • Provision of Airport fence & lights
  • Addressing other safety aspect of the Airport
  • Disburse of funds toward the contracts before end of 2016
  • At least 4 lane of 3 km are improved including construction of 2 bridges at the end of 2016
  • The stationeries expected to be procured in 2016
  • Administrative support provided to the project
  • Undertake erection of Airport Fence and lights installation in 2016

77-2 Disaster Housing Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Effective respond to climate change and manage the environment and risks of natural disasters.
Outcome

Develop and maintain measures to support communities in reducing their risks and managing consequences of disasters.
Outputs

Damaged Houses for Temotu repaired and reconstructed.
  • 862 houses for Temotu are built incorporating resilient features.

77-3 SIMSA Hydrographic Strengthening Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS: Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop Physical Infrastructure and Utilities to Ensure all Solomon Islanders have Access to Essential Services and Markets.
Outcome

Efficient and safe maritime transport.
Hydrographic surveys carried out and navigational Charts of Solomon Islands waters update.
Outputs
  • Purchase of hydrographic data acquisition and charting Software.
  • Enhanced Capacity in Hydrographic Data acquisition and processing.
  • SI Charts regenerated and updated.
  • HYPACK MAX Hydrographic Survey software purchased by Q2 2016
  • dKart Charting software purchased by Q2 2016
  • Fugro Marine STAR Correction Signals purchased by Q2 2016
    • SIHU assisted by Hydrographic equipment and software specialist Q2 2016.
    • Safer and shorter routes identified thus efficient maritime transport.

77-4 Office and Green Terrace Redevelopment Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact:

To improve Governance and order at National, Provincial and Community Levels and Strengthen Links between them and to Build and upgrade physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure that all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and to Markets,
Every staff at MID will have office space, The new MID Workshop facility will meet the demand of existing and future Road Transport, Senior government officers will have access to Properly Maintained Housing,
Outcome:

MID provides Construction and planned Maintenance to government owned buildings whether residential or non-residential to ensure safety of the property and the officers occupying the premises or accommodation in the long term,
Improved MID Office needs by 2018 including SIMSA and MID Engineering Complex, Proper Vehicle facilities for both Government and Private Sector by 2017, Improved Government Quarters at Green Terraces by 2016,
Outputs:
  • Office complex completed and fully equipped with modern high facilities and equipment,
  • Completed workshops and offices with modern facilities and equipment,
  • Properly designed, construction processed to completion of New SIMSA Office facility,
  • Refurbished 30 government quarters at the Green Terrance. On annual bases at least 4-8 quarters are refurbished over a 4-5 year period.
By end 2016 MID Office Building Construction is completed

Modern Vehicle Testing facility, Vehicle owners have the confidence in the Mechanical and Testing facilities Modern facility for SIMSA to carry out its mandatory roles effectively and efficiently Improved Housing Standard and access to better sanitation.

77-5 Rural Transport Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islands have access to essential services and markets
By 2020, at least 30% of Solomon Islanders in rural areas have access to essential services as a direct result of rehabilitated roads and bridges.
Outcome

Rehabilitated and new rural road infrastructure provides rural population to improved access to social facilities (health care center and schools), markets, rural economic centers and other transport infrastructure such as wharves and airfields.
60 % increase in maintainable rural roads in the provinces from 2015 to 2019
Outputs
  • Rehabilitation and new construction of rural roads and bridges infrastructures
  • Feasibility studies of selected existing and new rural roads
  • Wharves construction
  • Gravel Lease arrangements
  • At least 25 km of rural road rural are rehabilitated annually during the four years
  • At least 3 road studies are undertaken during the four year
  • At least a one or two construction of wharves per year
  • At least 12 gravel sites are targeted for gravel extraction from 2016 - 2020

77-6 National Transport Fund Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islands have access to essential services and markets
Solomon Islanders will be able to enjoy adequately improved main roads in Guadalcanal and Malaita provinces for better accessibility and lower transport costs by 2019

Honiara Core Road Network in adequate (at least fair) condition increases from 25% to 60%. Interisland cargo volume and passengers increased by 20% from 2013 to 2018.
Outcome
  • Honiara population can enjoy roads of adequate quality, facilitating efficient and safe traffic to economic and social services, which improves livelihoods and quality of life.
  • Rural population can enjoy roads of adequate quality, facilitating efficient and safe traffic to economic and social services, which improves livelihoods and quality of life.
  • Interisland shipping services are frequent, reliable and safe.
Main road network in adequate (at least fair) condition increases from 60% to 90%.



Honiara Core Road Network in adequate (at least fair) condition increases from 25% to 60%.



At least most rural roads in all provinces are maintained regularly. Civil works and transport services are provided in remote areas where output per capita is less than 75% of the national average Services on 8 remote routes increase from an average of once a quarter to at least once a month by 2015
Outputs
  • Main road and other feeders rehabilitation (including bridges)
  • Provincial main and town roads are under regular maintenance
  • Honiara feeder roads rehabilitated and improved
  • Selected wharves and airfields rehabilitation


4. Franchise shipping scheme established and operational
  • 20 km of main and feeder roads will be rehabilitated 2016 - 2019
  • Over 80 Km of provincial roads are under ongoing and regular maintenance
  • Increase in adequate level of service on the main roads in Guadalcanal and Malaita annually from 2016 to 2019
  • At least 2 wharves rehabilitations or 1 airstrips rehabilitated
  • At least 8 route franchises remaining operational by 2018

77-7 Navigational Aids Installation Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islands have access to essential services and markets
Rehabilitated Navaids ensure Solomon Islands is meeting the IMO convention (SOLAS) and improve the safety of local and foreign ships from 2016 -2020.
Outcome

Safer passes for conventional vessels and small crafts are facilitated by functioning, adequate and safe aids to navigation network throughout the country from Short-land in the West to Santa Cruz in the east.
8 light houses are functioning by 2020
Output

Rehabilitation of lighthouses
  • By 2017 at least 3 light houses are expected to be rehabilitated
  • By 2020 at least total 8 light houses are expected to be rehabilitated

77-8 Shipping Initiatives Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islands have access to essential services and markets
Solomon Islanders will be able to enjoy adequately improved frequent shipping services by 2020 Interisland cargo volume and passengers increased by 20% from 2013 to 2018.
Outcome

MID provides through constituencies a safe and reliable shipping services to economical and uneconomical parts of Solomon Islands.
At least 10% of targeted expansion of Shipping fleet by 2020
Outputs

Increase in No. of Vessels servicing the provinces of Solomon Islands
Increase in shipping services by 2020.

77-9 Development Infrastructure Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islands have access to essential services and markets
By 2020, at least 30% of Solomon Islanders in rural areas have access to essential services as a direct result of rehabilitated roads, bridges and wharves. By 2020 Government Ministries including MEHRD, MFMR and MFAET and OPMC, have New Office spaces.
Outcome

Rehabilitated and new rural road infrastructure provides rural population to improved access to social facilities (health care center and schools), markets, rural economic centers and other transport infrastructure such as wharves and airfields.

Upgrading and construction of airfields Improved wharves facilities MID provides Management of Government works from design to planned Maintenance of government owned buildings whether residential or non-residential
60 % increase in maintainable rural roads in the provinces from 2015 to 2019





Improved airfields runways by 2016

Construction of wharves by 2016

Improved Government Establishments and/or Office needs by 2018



Improved Government Housing Needs by 2017
Outputs

Road activities
  • Rehabilitation of selected important access roads
  • Tar sealing and construction of selected airfields
  • Selected roads, airfields feasibility studies including design works


Wharves construction



Government funded buildings - MEHRD Education Infrastructures Programme completed and fully furnished.

OPMC and MFAET office Building completed and fully furnished; MFMR Office Program completed; New PM’s Residence completed; New Speakers Residence completed; New Leader of Oppositions Residence completed
  • At least 1 mobilisation road rehabilitation contract
  • At least mobilisation of contracts for sealing of 5 airfields
  • At least mobilisation of 2 Feasibility studies and design works
  • At least 1 or 2 wharves are constructed
  • MEHRD Schools and Office Design to Construction completed by 2017
  • Office Design to Construction to OPMC and MFAET completed by end of 2018
  • MFMR Office Designs and Construction completed by end of 2017; Improved Housing Standard by end of 2016

79 National Parliament

79-1 National Parliament Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Improved governance and order at National, Provincial and community levels and strengthened links between Parliament and citizens of Solomon Islands contributing to the legislative processes
  • Parliament buildings refurbished, made safe, secured, water proofed roof structure, and treated from termites producing clean and safe working office environment. Also Parliament Sittings broadcasted live via television.
  • Paul Tovua Complex secured from tipping over and strongly supported by a retention wall. Also Parliament Committee Office completed enabling MPs and Public to involve in committee Hearings and contribute to the Legislative process.
  • Improved and secured Parliament precinct
Outcome

National Parliament and individual MP’s able to work more effectively.

Solomon Islands Citizens and the Public able to contribute to Committee Hearings and participate in the Legislative Process
  • MPs and staff and the Public accessing Parliament buildings are working in safe and secure office buildings.
  • Sufficient space and facilities available for MPs, Public and NPO staff use during Committee inquiries and Parliament meetings
  • MPs and staff are working in a safe, secured and clean environment.
Outputs
  • National Parliament facilities refurbished and renovated.
  • Parliamentary infrastructure development completed.
  • National Parliament Precinct developed.
  • Refurbish by waterproofing the roof of the Parliament buildings to prevent rain from sipping into offices
  • Maintain by refurbishing the Parliament building ceiling and expand the Registry office to cater for receptionist office and to be completed by 2016 4th qtr. Treat termites.
  • Purchase Media equipment to enable Parliament to broadcast Parliament sitting through television
  • Construct the PTC retention wall to ensure PTC building is safe from tipping over the cliff. Work to begin in 2016.
  • Construct Parliamentary Committees Office complex commencing in 2016 and to be completed by 2018
  • Rebuild the Official Residence of the Speaker by 2017
  • Rebuild Opposition Office by 2020
  • Develop a MPs recreational centre completed by 2019
  • Fence to secure National Parliament site complete by 2015
  • Back road access to Paul Tovua complex completed 2014
  • Landscaping National Parliament precinct completed 2017

80 Ministry of Forestry and Research

80-1 Downstream Processing Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 1: To Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute the Benefits of Employment and Higher Incomes Amongst All the Provinces and People of the Solomon Islands
GDP (2005 PPP$) to increase at an average rate in excess of 4.5 to not less than US$2 billion by 2020.
Outcome

Smallholder incomes from timber increased.
  • Annual average income increased to more than 25% from 2020 from current export level.
Outputs

1.1 Increased Resource Owner Capacity



1.2 Timber Yard Development



1.3 Forest Stewardship Council Certification



1.4 Increased Capacity of Rural Training Centres



1.5 Marketing Support
  • Resource owners participating in the Timber Industry increased by 30% from current levels by 2020.
  • Timber Yard fully developed by 2015.
  • FSC certified communities increased from 2 to 25 by 2020.
  • Increased number of Well trained graduates from current levels by 25% by 2020.
  • Increased timber export by VATA by 50% by 2020.

80-2 National Forestry Resources Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Increase economic growth and equitably distribute employment and income benefits.
Operation of sustainable forest Development & reforestation program.
Outcome

Sustained and improved contribution of the forestry sector to the National Economy.
To maintain average annual planting target of 205 hectares
Outputs
  • Implementation of Technical training programs.
  • Establishment of Forest Plantations.
  • Implementation of quality control operations.
  • Improve collection & distribution of quality seeds to out growers.
  • 18 technical trainings conducted by end of November 2016.
  • 205 hectares of forest plantation established by Nov.2016.
  • Quality of Forest Plantations improved to 80 percent by 2020
  • 4 new seed sources establish, current seed sources maintained and increased in seed collection to 1,000kg/yr by 2017.

80-3 National Herbarium & Botanical Garden Fencing & Landscaping

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and income Benefits.
A securely fenced and fully functional Government Research and Recreational Facility by December 2018
Outcome

Safe, secure and attractive facility for re-search, amenity and indigenous pharmacological uses
•Commercializing services to sustain the facility by 2018

Identification of 50-100 medicinal plants per year from 2014 to 2019
Outputs
  • Fencing: Secure fencing around botanical Garden area
  • Landscaping: Appropriate and Professionally landscaped Botanical garden
  • Access Road and Parking Lot Improvement: well maintained access road to the facility and a well maintained parking lot for visitors
  • Establishment of Terrestrial Parks in Provinces: Provincial Terrestrial parks established for research, educational purposes, income generation for communities (through REDD+ or user pay) and amenities.
  • Complete fencing of Botanical garden area by 4th quarter 2019
  • No squatter settlements within the boundaries of the Botanical garden by 4th quarter 2018
  • Improved landscaping and facilities at selected sites within the Botanical garden completed by4th quarter 2018
  • Improved road access and parking lot by 4th Qtr. 2015
  • Terrestrial Parks established in Provinces by 2020

80-4 National Herbarium Research Laboratory Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefits
National Plant Research Laboratory with Specialized equipment installed by 4th quarter 2016
Outcome

Quality Plant research Services with increased ownership of local data
  • Well-equipped research facility completed by 4th quarter of 2016
  • More sophisticated plant researches conducted locally by 2nd quarter 2017
Outputs
  • Quality Plant research Services with increased ownership of local data
Laboratory complex completed by 4th quarter 2016

80-5 Native Forest Enrichment and Research

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Generate jobs and increased employment opportunities for the growing population and achieve high economic growth, wealth and social wellbeing for all Solomon islanders
  • Increase in small scale enrichment planting projects and farmers in Solomon Islands at 200 hectares per year
  • Implementation of Native Forest Enrichment Planting and Rehabilitation national program in Solomon Islands by 2021
Outcome

Increase and restore timber supply from natural forests
  • Interests and quantity of self- imitative enrichment planting projects and farmers will increase and more native forest areas replanted.
  • Implementation of Native Forest Enrichment planting and Rehabilitation program by 2022
Outputs
  • promote and increase small scale native Species enrichment planting projects and farmers through subsidy assistance for tools and Maintenance
  • Development of Native Forest Silvicultural manual and Guidelines
  • Increase annual enrichment planting of logged over forest land areas to 1000 hectares from 20 2021 at 200 hectares per 2016 per annum from nil in 2015 and 2 hectare in 2013
  • Identification and establishment of 15 native forest enrichment planting and rehabilitation trial pilot plots by 2018 and formulation and development of native Forest silvicultural Guides and manual by 2021

80-6 Identification & Establishment of REDD+ Pilot Sites

Design SummaryPerformance Targets & Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 1: Sustainable Utilization of SI Natural Forest Resource to encourage economic Development and improved national Revenue and standard of living.
Establishment of appropriate policies, strategies and enabling institution and system to enhance development of the Forest Resource.
Outcome

Sectoral Objective: Embellishment of the Sustainable Forest Management strategy in Forest Biomass and Carbon content inventory to quantify potentials to mitigate climate change as well as enabling participation in the Carbon Trade Market, to benefit of Solomon Islands and its people and to the environment hence the global community.
Establish the Forest Biomass value and carbon content of forest and vegetation types in the country. To enable assessment and quantification of carbon storage capacity and changes. To facilitate carbon regulation and trade. Implementation of the REDD+ project.
Outputs
  • Project Design
  • Partnership and training
  • Field survey, establishment
  • Field measurement
  • Data Analysis


6. Reference level
The project commences at the 1st qtr and plots are establish by the 3rd qtr. The main indicator is the mapping of the carbon content of vegetation types and the National reference Level

81 Office of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

81-1 PMO Reform Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5, MTS 12 and 13: improve Governance and Order at National, Provincial and Community levels and Strengthen Links between them
Improved government policy implementation by year 2020
Outcome

Political, administrative and community Government machinery work more efficiently and effectively
PMO reform offices established and operational by 3rd quarter of 2016.
Output
  • Land reform program operational by 4th quarter 2015
  • Political integrity Act operational by 2016
  • New National Constitutional of Solomon Island passed and operational by 2018/19
  • Land reform recommendations submitted for Cabinet approval by 4th quarter of 2015
  • Guadalcanal land dealings consultation started by mid 2015
  • Political integrity office operation in mid 2016
  • Constitutional committee appointed and working by 3rd quarter of 2015
  • Draft new constitution prepared and completed by 2016
  • National consultation on new constitution conducted by 2016/17

81-2 OPMC Infrastructure Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5, MTS 12:efficient and effective public service
Improved government policy implementation by year 2020
Outcome

Cabinet Ministers and staffs work more efficient and effectively
  • OPMC office complex occupied by year 2019
  • New PM residence completed and occupied by 2018
  • New SIIAC Completed
Outputs
  • OPMC Office complex completed
  • PMs new residence completed
  • SIICAC Office Complex
  • UXO Bomb Disposal
  • Utilities Alignment
  • Architectural & engineering design completed by 2016: Construction started by 2017 and completed by 2019
  • Architectural Design started 1std quarter 2016
  • Construction of New Residence started by 2017 and by 2018
  • Survey; Geotech
  • Architectural Design started 1st quarter 2016; Construction started 3rd Quarter 2016

83 Ministry of Police, National Security and Correctional Services

82-3 Police and Correctional Service Infrastructure

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 5, MTS 13- Improve Governance and Order at National, Provincial and Community Levels and Strengthen Links between Them.
  • Increased number of investors over the years,
  • investor confidence in country
Outcome

Build the capacity of the RSIPF staff to be able to deliver accessible, efficient and effective policing services to the government and people of the Solomon Islands.
  • Increased number of reported cases,
  • Improve Public confidence on the police force
Outputs
  • good and secured residential buildings


2. Police posts for RSIPF established in the rural & isolated areas
  • police and correctional services houses completed by end of December 2015,
  • 6 police posts completed by end of September 2015,
  • 12 police station completed by end of May 2018

84 Ministry of Provincial Government and Institutional Strengthening

83-1 Provincial Township Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS: Objective 1: increase the rate of Economic Growth, Employment and Income amongst all province and people.
  • 10-20% increase in provincials revenue by 2018
  • 5-10% increase in employment rate by 2018
Outcome

Increased participation in economic and social activities by rural populace in Choiseul Guadalcanal and Makira Provinces.
  • Increased access to health, education and other social services by 2018.
  • Increased proportion of people participates in economic activities at the province by 2018.
Outputs

Choiseul Bay Township development.

  • Land admin and physical planning management
  • Office establishment and Administration.
  • Infrastructure development and constructions implemented.


Doma Township developments implemented.
  • Land admin and physical planning process implemented.
  • Site preparation developments implemented.
  • Infrastructure development and construction implemented.


Huro Township Development.

  • Land admin and physical planning implemented.
  • Infrastructure development.
  • Local planning scheme and zoning plan formalized by mid 2016.
  • Project office established and fully functioned from 2015 to 2019.
  • Infrastructure and road rehabilitation completed by end 2018.
  • National coordination committee formalized by 2016.
  • Town Planning, Subdivisions and designs completed by 2017.

83-2 Provincial Institutional Infrastructure Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

[NDS Objective 5]: Improved governance and order at national, provincial, and community levels and strengthened links between them.
  • Stable Provincial governments.
  • Number of bills passed by provincial assemblies increased from 10 to 20 by end of 2019.
  • Number of Public Accounts Committees increased from 5 to 9
Outcome

Provincial staffs enjoy proper residential houses and office facilities and are able to carry out their functions more effectively.
  • Reduced number of staffs turn-over.
  • Reduced number of vacant key posts to 0 by end of 2019.
  • Provincial Governments have access to proper housing, office and facilities.
Outputs

1.0 New Provincial staff Houses completed

2.0 Provincial & National Office complexes completed.
  • 4 provincial staff house completed per year from 2014.
  • 6 Provincial Office Complex completed by 2018.

83-3 Provincial Governance Strengthening Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5, MTS 13: Improved governance and order at national, provincial and community levels and strengthen links at all levels.
  • Stable provincial gov’t
  • Motion of no confidence for provincial assemblies decreased from 10 to 5 by end of 2016
  • Number of public accounts committee increased from 7 to 9
Outcome

Improved service delivery as a result of effective implementation of the program.
  • Improved financial reporting of provincial gov’ts from 85% to 100%.
  • Increased citizen participation in development decision making
Outputs PCDF grant.
  • Provide funds for small-scale capital investments in service delivery.
  • Provide funds for small-scale infrastructure development.
  • Access to social services and basic infrastructure by the rural population increased from 20% to 30% by 2015.

85 Ministry of Lands, Housing and Survey

85-1 Solomon Islands Urban Management Programme (SUMP)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Identify and resolve the underlying challenges associated with informal settlements in urban and semi-urban areas and support informal settlers through community driven and rights-based approaches to development.
Urban and semi-urban Land Management, Governance, Planning and Development in Solomon Islands are efficient and effective by 2020.
Outcome

Improved Urban and semi-urban Land Management, Governance, Planning and Development.
Urban and semi-urban Land Management, Governance, Planning and Development challenges identified and addressed in Solomon Islands improved by 2020.
Outputs
  • Land Reform TOL Upgrading Project.
  • Urban Centres Profiling Project.
  • Building Assessment & Valuation Project.
  • National Development/Resettlement Project.
  • National Lands Auditing Project.
  • National Urbanization
  • Survey and demarcation of TOL Subdivision Plan for Cana Hill (new) Feraladoa, Fulisango, Zion and Green Valley (old) completed by 2016
  • Urban Profiling for Tulagi and Kirakira urban centres in completed by 2016
  • Building Assessment & Valuation for Auki town completed by 2016.
  • Resettlement Areas studied and identified by 2016.
  • Alienated and crown Land in Solomon Island is identified and audited by 2016.
  • National Urbanization Policy is developed by 2016.

85-2 Land Development, Preparation and Construction Programme (LDPCP)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Provide an enabling environment to stimulate economic growth in urban and rural areas.
More land, infrastructure and building is made available to stimulate economic growth by 2019 and thereafter.
Outcome

Government service delivery improved through land, building and infrastructure availability.
More Land, Infrastructure, and Building prepared, built and acquired by 2019 and thereafter.
Outputs
  • Lands Office Housing Project
  • Site Development Project
  • Doma USP Land Project
  • Land (Resource) Owners’ partnership in Development project
  • Urban Land Expansion Project
  • Tina Hydropower Project
  • One new provincial lands office housing constructed by 2015
  • One new commercial subdivision prepared, serviced to stimulate economic growth by 2015
  • Another $2m instalment Payment for Doma USP Land by 2015.
  • Project piloting the Growth Centre Concept under the Land (resource) owners’ partnership in development is completed by 2015
  • More land is leased or purchased to cater for Urban expansion in Honiara, Auki and Gizo by 2015
  • Increased MLHS commitment in Payment of land related expenditure in support of the Tina Hydropower by Project by 2015

85-3 Institutional and Capacity Building Strengthening Programme (ICBSP)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Enhance social reform and economic advancement in the country.
Land Management and Governance at all levels well established in Solomon Islands by 2019.
Outcome

Stakeholders better served through an improved & strengthened MLHS service delivery.
Strengthened and improved Logistics, Legal framework, Organisational structure and ICT for MLHS by 2019.
Outputs

1.0 MLHS Legislative Programme.

2.0 Ministerial Restructuring Programme.

3.0 ICT Server and Database upgrade Programme.
  • MLHS existing Acts and Subsidiary Regulations reviewed by 2019.
  • More than 80% of MLHS Provincial Offices have access to Computers and Software by 2019.

86 Ministry of Development Planning and Aid Coordination

86-1 Institutional Development Program

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 5: To Improve Governance and Order at National, Provincial and Community Levels and Strengthen Links between them.
Outcome

More effective planning, coordination processes in MDPAC
  • Development plans, budgets and work plan processing completed in a timely manner.
  • Coordination with development partners more effective and mainstreamed in MDPAC processes.
  • Monitoring and evaluation of plans and programmes is comprehensive and timely.
  • MDPAC successfully carried out its lead role in the SINIIP and as well as NRIMP Formulation
Outputs

Institutional Development Programme
  • Support in the area of NHRDTP implementation and probably Population Policy Implementation Plan.
  • Strengthening Monitoring and Evaluation systems in MDPAC
  • TA – Support to NDS Implementation and Development Planning Reform
  • Support to the SINIIP Implementation
  • Support to the Formulation of Natural Resource Integrated Management Plan
  • Strengthened Aid Coordination and Management and the Development Assistance Database
  • A NHRDTP implemented by end 2014.
  • National Population Policy Implementation Plan is developed by 2014.
  • ME systems in MDPAC is in place by 2014.
  • Support to NDS is fully implemented by mid 2015.
  • SINIIP is well coordinated during its implementation.
  • The Development of NRIMP by 2015
  • Aid Coordination Strategy is implemented by end 2015.
  • DAD is fully operational by 2015.

86-2 Rural Development Programme

87 Ministry of Culture and Tourism

87-1 Tourism Development and Institutional Strengthening Program

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 5: Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefit through tourism
  • Tourism contribution to GDP increase by 2% per year.
Outcome

Increased tourism in Solomon Islands with more even distribution between destinations throughout the provinces
  • International visitor arrivals increased by 18% per year.
  • Visitor expenditure increase by 7% per year.
  • Direct and indirect employment of Solomon Islanders in tourism grows by 5% each year.
  • Increasing recreational visitor nights by 70% in centres outside Honiara per year.
Outputs
  • Tourism Support Infrastructure Tourism Support Infrastructure and facilities is developed in identified areas in the country.
  • Pilot Proejcts - Increased and enhanced Tourism Product through identified pilot project.
  • Eco-tourism Grant More local people are involved and benefit from tourism through the development of small scale eco-tourism project that are economically viable and environmentally and culturally sustainable.
  • A new tourism office building for the Ministry of Culture and Tourism is completed by 2017.
  • New tourism offices and information centres for Western and Malaita completed by December 2016 while planning for the other provinces starts by March 2015.
  • A replica of the former BSIP Commissioner Residence house is completed and converted into a heritage building with museum and other facilities by 2017.
  • The Guadalcanal Trek is fully completed, promoted and become a standalone destination for tourist by 2016.
  • At least 2 tourist facilities are developed at the Forest Lake and it becomes a popular tourist destination by 2016.
  • Maruyama trail is properly developed and becomes a tourist attraction by 2016.
  • Most of the WWII sites are identified, rehabilitated and promoted as tourist attractions by 2019.
  • model island resorts are developed and promoted by 2017.
  • Between 10 to 20 economically viable eco-tourism projects are supported by 2015.

87-2 SI National Museum & National Archives

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
NDS Objective 1 and 2: To alleviate poverty and improve the lives of Solomon Islanders in peaceful and stable societyPreserve the cultural relics and documentations that have made to build the communities of Solomon islands and have foretold the history of Solomon Islands and its people.
Outcome

The culture, arts and heritage including important historical and documentary records of Solomon Islands are appropriately protected, safeguarded, developed and promoted.
Increased visitors and users of the National Museum and National Archives facilities and resources by 5-10%
Outputs
  • Provision of new infrastructure for the Solomon Islands National Museum (SINM)
  • The protection of Wrecks and War Relics Act 1980 CAP 150 to be reviewed by end of 2015
  • The New SINM Act to be enacted by end of 2016
  • Provision for the Expansion and Improvement of the National Archives
  • Establishment of Digital Recording System
  • Begin construction in July 2015 and new Museum Complex opened by September 2019; Construction of retaining wall/gabion along the Mbokona Stream completed by early 2016; Landscaping of the Museum compound completed by 2019
  • New generator to be installed by 2020
  • Installation of internet facilities, telephone lines, lights and audio-visual equipment by 2020
  • Tender for Consultant to review the WWII Act after mid-2014 while most of the processes done in 2015
  • Review completed by end of 2016
  • Tender for consultant(s) to develop the SINM Act in mid-2014 – early 2015; Completed draft by end of 2015
  • Enactment of new SINM Act in 2016
  • Fencing and security hut to be completed by end of 2015
  • More space for the acquisition of records to be transferred to National Archives; backlog of Records in the Government Ministries are processed; more archival services are provided for the public (all by May 2016)
  • Accessibility of information by more researchers (2016)
  • Improve the accessibility of historical records/files (as of 2016)
  • Digitisation Policy in Place (June 2015)
  • Training of officers (November 2015)

87-3 Supporting the expansion of sustainable cruise shipping and yachting sector

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 1: Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefit through tourism
  • Tourism contribution to GDP increase by 2% per year
Outcome

The new passenger terminal will improve the facilitation of visitor dispersal and will also improve the level of Solomon Islands appeal as a cruise ship destination.
  • The frequency and number of large cruise ship visit to Honiara increased by 7% each year.
  • The frequency and number of visits by the medium and small expedition cruise vessels increased by 10%.
  • The number of inbound operators increased by 30% and improve the on-shore products and tours available to the cruise companies.
  • New cruise destinations are identified and associated infrastructure and facilities developed
Outputs
  • Cruise ship passenger terminal building at the SIPA area.
  • Jetties, tenders and other facilities such as toilets are completed for up to 10 sites.
  • On-shore products such suitable transportation, tour guides and tours/excursion are improved.
  • New cruise passenger terminal is completed by June 2017.
  • Jetties, tenders and other facilities such as toilets are completed for more than 10 sites by 2020.

88 Ministry of Commerce, Industry, Labour and Immigration

88-1 Industrial and Commercial Estate Development

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
To increase the rate of Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute the benefits of Employment and Higher Incomes amongst all provinces and people of the Solomon IslandsIncrease in GDP from 2% to 10% by 2019. Increase in per capita income to SBD15,000 per annum by 2019.
Outcome

Increase economic activities
Increase in downstream processing and manufacturing activities to 1000 by 2019. Create 10,000 additional jobs by 2019. Increase of 300% in cash-flow into rural areas. Increase by 500% in production by 2019
Outputs
  • Noro Industrial Estate
  • Provincial Industrial/Commercial Estate
  • Land secured; -Roads constructed; wharfs constructed; Business building constructed.
  • Basic utilities put in place; land subdivided to business plots; Investors flowing in and establishing; management and control authorities instituted.

88-2 Private Sector and MSME Development Program

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

{NDS objective 5 states clearly the need to “increase the rate of economic growth” equitably to all provinces.
Increased GDP growth from 4% to 5% by 2019 Increased employment rate from 2% to 5% by 2019
Outcome

Investors enjoy conducive environment to establish and operate business activities in all sectors
Number of SME established in the country and operational increased to 25,000 by 2019
Outputs/Projects
  • appropriate institutional framework for SME development in place
  • culture of entrepreneurship among Solomon Islanders
  • SME access to business development services
  • mechanisms for SMEs to access appropriate business financing
  • SME access to local, regional and international markets and market information
  • Promote innovation and technological capacity of SMEs for competitiveness
  • Product innovation and development
  • MSME Policy & Implementation Project continues 1st quarter 2016
  • National Industrial Policy & Strategies completed by 1st quarter 2016
  • Research & Development Studies conducted by 2nd quarter 2016
  • Cooperative Legislation Reviewed by 2nd quarter 2016 (e) LPC Policy Framework completed by 3rd quarter 2016
  • National Export Strategy completed by 2016
  • TA to review existing SME legislation and prepare bill to enact MSME during 2nd Quarter 2016
  • Down Stream Processing of Coconut, Cocoa & Timber Promoted by 2016
  • Industrial Skill Training (Value Added) done by 2nd quarter 2016
  • Business Development Services Conducted by 2016 through 2017
  • Private Sector Technical & Financial Assistance established by 2nd and 3rd quarter 2016
  • Trade Directory & Promotion started from 1st quarter 2016 and expected to complete 3rd to 4th quarter 2016
  • Technologies capacities of SMEs introduced from 2017
  • At least 5 new products are designed and developed, increasing national production base.

88-3 Economic Growth Centres Development

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
To increase the rate of Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute the benefits of Employment and Higher Incomes amongst all provinces and people of the Solomon IslandsIncrease in GDP from 2% to 10% by 2019. Increase in per capita income to SBD15,000 per annum by 2019.
Outcome

Increase economic activities
Increase in downstream processing and manufacturing activities to 1000 by 2019. Create 10,000 additional jobs by 2019. Increase of 300% in cash-flow into rural areas. Increase by 500% in production by 2019
Outputs
  • Bina Harbour Economic Infrastructure
  • Suava Bay Economic Growth Centre
  • Liwe Industrial Park
  • Wairokai EGC
  • Provincial EGCs: (i) South Vella La Vella – West; (ii) Afio – South Malaita; (iii) Faumamanu – Malaita (iv) Marau – Guadalcanal; (v) Molou - Auki Langalanga, Malaita; (vi)Tatamba – Isabel ; (vii) West Bay – Russel Islands; (viii) Wawa – Makira/Ulawa; (ix) Vanikoro –Temotu/Vatud; (x) Rennel – Renbell; (xi) West New Georgia – Hon. Silas Tausinga; (xii)Kumanibae – East Choiseul
  • Land acquisition done; Feasibility Studies completed
  • Roads constructed; wharfs constructed
  • Business building constructed; basic utilities put in place.
  • Land subdivided to business plots; investors flowing in and establishing.
  • EGC endorsed by respective Provincial Government; MOU/MOA Signed; Conducted scoping; Design Master plan and or Schematic Map

89 Ministry of Civil Aviation and Communication

89-1 Provincial Airports Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

(NDS OBJ. 1), MTS 3: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and markets
Solomon Islanders enjoying access to air transportation in all weather conditions
Outcome

Economic and Social activities Improved
Passenger’s number and Cargo volume increase from previous years as these services are provided that assures their comfort and safety.
Outputs
  • Airport is free from EOD and FOD.
  • Airport infrastructure is rehabilitated and sealed
  • New Domestic Terminals Built
  • All airports are clear for resealing by 2015
  • Seghe, Lata and Taro airports resealed and completed by 2016.
  • Seghe, Lata and Tingoa Terminals completed by 2016

89-2 International Airports (Henderson & Munda) program

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3:Develop physical infrastructure and Utilities to ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and markets.
Air Transportation is safer and efficient.
Outcome

Safe and secure environment for the traveling.
Increase in number of passengers coming into the country
Outputs
  • Enhanced Security Surveillance
  • Munda Terminal
  • International Airport (Munda & Honiara) Staff Houses
  • Munda Fire station
  • Civil aviation complex
  • Aircraft Navigation equipment installed at Henderson and Munda
  • Henderson and Munda Perimeters roads sealed.
  • Replacement and Installation of Security equipment at Henderson and Munda airports by 2016
  • New Terminal Building at Munda by end of 2016.
  • Staff houses for officers working at Honiara & Munda International airport completed by 2016
  • Fire station building in place to accommodate fire tender for coverage at Munda Airport completed by 2015
  • Civil Aviation completed/Office completed by July 2015
  • Navigational equipment and Communication equipment commissioned in place.
  • Security surveillance and routine patrol to secure airport.

90 Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources

90-1 Community Fisheries Livelihoods

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1 and 2: To Alleviate Poverty and Provide Greater Benefits and Opportunities to Improve the Lives of Solomon Islanders in a Peaceful and Stable Society
2-5% increase in the income earned by coastal fishers by 2018

Food security improved - Maintaining the per capita of 35kg of fish per person annually.
Outcome

Lives of Solomon Islanders are improved.
10% of the coastal population are using the livelihood alternatives by 2018
Outputs
  • Fish Aggregation maintenance and monitoring
  • Seaweed Farming expansion
  • Farming of Milkfish
  • Farming of Tilapia
  • Farming of sea cucumber (Stichopus horrens)
  • Community Based Resource
  • Fisheries rehabilitation
  • Constituency Fisheries rehabilitation.
  • Communities taking care of FADs deployed within their proximity by 2018. For each 12 pieces of iFAD will be Deployed for each Province.
  • 500 metric tonnes of dried seaweed produced p.a.
  • 9 active farmers farming milkfish by 2018.
  • 9 active farmers farming Tilapia by 2018.
  • 2 pilot sites are support by 2018.
  • Improved coordination of fisheries resource.
  • Fisheries Centers built and fully functional by 2018
  • Research centre complete by 2018.

90-2 Infrastructure Supporting Livelihoods

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS, Objective 1 and 2: To Build and Upgrade Physical Infrastructure and Utilities to Ensure that all Solomon Islanders have Access to Essential Services and to Markets
10% of coastal communities having access to improved services that deals with fisheries livelihood by 2019
Outcome

Improved infrastructures to support livelihood programs
Improvement of 10 infrastructures supporting the management and development of fisheries resources by 2019
Outputs
  • Fisheries Centre Rehabilitation
  • Provincial Fisheries Housing
  • Radio Awareness program
  • MFMR Seafront reclamation
  • Reclamation of seafront in Provincial Fisheries centres
  • Building of New Compliance Office 7.0. Aquaculture Research Centre
  • Two Fisheries centres rehabilitated by end of 2019
  • 4 new staff houses built in the 4 Provinces by 2019
  • Radio program awareness conducted in 4 Provinces by 2019
  • MFMR Seafront reclamation completed by 2015
  • 2 fisheries centre in the Provinces seafront reclamation by 2015.
  • 2 storey complex building completed by 2015
  • Building Complete,2017

90-3 Tuna Onshore Development

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1: Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefits
Fisheries GDP at constant prices increases by not less than 6% every year.

30% percent increase in tuna landed for processing by 2018
Outcome

Increase the Export of Solomon Islands Tuna processed products.
30% increase in Tuna catch landed locally in Solomon Islands by 2018

Food production increase by 10% annually
Outputs
  • Land at Suafa secured for the Tuna onshore development.
  • Bina Onshore Development
  • Masupa Mini Cannery Survey studies
  • Tulagi Mini Cannery
  • Outright payment negotiated and scheduled to be paid by 2nd quarter 2015
  • Mobilisation, Cost and benefit and feasibility studies complete by 2016
  • Feasibility studies complete.
  • Feasibility studies complete

91 Ministry of Public Service

91-1 Public Service Infrastructure Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Improve Government and order at the National, Provincial and community levels and strengthen links at all levels.
The composite country performance rating (CCPR) increase from 10.5 in 2011 to at least 13 by 2020. Improved service delivery experienced by 80% of all Solomon Islanders by 2020.
Outcome

MPS through the Institute of Public Administration and Management (IPAM) able to deliver trainings to contribute to the creation of a skilled, professional and ethical Public Service Workforce.
  • The number of programs delivered by IPAM that leads to effective and efficient service delivery.
  • Number of Public officers trained using the new complex.
  • Number/range of courses provided by IPAM.
Outputs

Design and construct a learning and development Complex to house the IPAM.
New IPAM learning and development complex completed and ready for use by 30 June 2017.

92 Ministry of Justice and Legal Affairs

92-1 MJLA Institutional Infrastructure Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Improve Governance and order at the National, Provincial and community levels and strengthen links at all levels.
The composite country performance rating (CCPR) increase from 10.5 in 2011 to at least 13 by 2020.
Outcome

Capacity of the Courts, legal staff and systems are better able to deliver accessible, efficient and effective justice services to the government and people of Solomon Islands
  • Improved efficiency results in pre-trial detainees and remand prisoners from 41% in 2011 to less than 30% by 2018
Outputs
  • Justice and Legal complex completed and operational
  • New housing for critical justice staff increased
  • Building completed by 2016
  • MJLA divisions, DPP, PSO, AG and Court of Appeals working from same building by end 2019
  • Two houses built a year

93 Ministry of Home Affairs

93-1 Solomon Islands Electoral Commission IT Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

To improve governance and order at National, Provincial and Community levels and strengthen links between them
Public perception about the Government on various measures such as corruption, policing, is improved.
Outcome

Solomon Islanders Civil Rights better served by improved Electoral and Civil Registration Systems
  • All Solomon Islanders have a recognised civil status by 2020
  • All Solomon Islanders are registered as eligible to vote in general elections.
Outputs

SIEC IT Data Base and system is developed
IT system in place by 2015

93-2 Provincial Sports Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

To develop physical infrastructure and Utilities to ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and markets,
Increased number of people have access to basic infrastructures & other facilities
Outcome

To develop sporting infrastructure that will contribute towards wellbeing of children, youths and the population as a whole
  • Increased number of medal counts in regional competitions such as the South Pacific Games
Outputs
  • Provincial Sports Institute comprising Stadia and Fields developed in Provinces and the Urban Centres including Honiara.
National Sports Infrastructure/Facilities Survey carried out by 2015 - 16,

A Base-Line Data/Information on existing sports facilities in and around the provincial centres will be known.

This information is important for planning purposes + allocation of resources, to improve and diversify benefits to all.

93-3 MHA Office Building Complex

94 Ministry of National Unity Reconciliation and Peace

94-1 National Peace Building & State building Program

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

{NDS Objective 5, MTS 14improve national unity at all levels
The decline in surveyed perception of living in safe and peaceful communities is reversed so that it does not fall below 25% and is raised to 50% or more by 2020.
Outcome

Existing and emerging threats to peace and security are effectively dealt with to build peace in the community.
By 2018 all existing and emerging threats to peace and security will be drastically reduced.
Outputs

Improved capacity for effective and efficient human resource man power in MNURP
  • Early Warning Systems /Resilience and report on potential threats to Conflict in place
  • Human Resource Development Plan implemented successfully with more staff trained in relevant training needs/gaps
  • Institutional Infrastructure – Staff Residential Development (Honiara and in provinces)
  • Youth and Peace Building capacity building trainings
  • Effective and efficient work performance in MNURP
  • An effective and efficient early warning system is in place to signal potential threats and risk to national peace, Unity and Security by 2018
  • MNURP will eventually have a very capable workforce in the ministry with a well-developed Human Resources Information System by 2018
  • 40% of the initial 20 houses under the institutional infrastructures should be completed by 2018 in either Honiara or the provincial offices (Malaita, Guadalcanal Western and Choiseul Province).
  • Youth and peace building activities will reach out to youths in the Solomon Islands by 2018 with peace initiatives integrated livelihood trainings.

95 Ministry of Mines, Energy and Rural Electrification

95-1 Constituency Renewable Rural Electrification

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3, and Objective 2, MTS 5: Develop physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and markets
  • An increase in rural population access to basic electricity for lighting from current 15% to 50% by year 2018.
Outcome

Electrification of rural Communities and households
  • Replacement of Kerosene lantern with solar technology for lighting, 30 % of rural households by 2020
  • Less usage of petroleum products from 100% to less 50% by 2018
  • Data will reflect, a significant reduction of GHG Emissions from the initial 0.84Gg CO2 per capita to 0.42Gg by 2018
Outputs
  • Rural communities receive solar for lighting and other uses.
  • Recipient trained for basic operation of solar equipment.
  • Increases in no. of solar users in rural areas.
  • Implementation of solar project at the end December 2014-2015 each year.
  • Decrease demand for replacement systems by users in each constituency 25% by 2020.
  • Decrease in import of Kerosene into the Solomon Islands at by 30% of total imports by 2020.

95-2 Renewable Energy Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1: Develop Physical Infrastructure and Utilities to Ensure all Solomon Islanders have Access to Essential Services and Markets
Increase Renewable Energy contribution to the national electricity supply grid from 0.64 to 5.5 by 2018 Increase number of households connected to electricity grid from 10,748 households (2009) to by 2017

Reduce electricity tariff from $6-00 per kWh unit (2013) to $3-00 per kWh unit by 2017
Outcome

Solomon Islanders receive improved levels of electricity services in terms of quality, quantity, affordability and sustainable electricity supply.
Increase number of households connected to electricity grid from 10,748 households (2009) to 40,000 by 2017
Outputs
  • 20MW hydro-power scheme commissioned in 2017 to supply Honiara grid.
  • 750W Fiu hydro-power plant commissioned by 2017 for supply of Auki grid.
  • 5 rural schools and 5 rural clinics installed with sustainable solar power systems by end 2015
  • 2 Economic Growth Centres with micro-hydropower systems by 2015.
  • Wind data for the country available by 2017 which is currently non-existent
  • Cheap electricity after commissioning of hydro power in 2017. $3.00 per kWh from current $6,40 per kWh
  • Renewable energy generation increased as a percentage of Auki power generation, from 0% in June 2014 to 99% (2.04 GWh) by June 2018
  • Duration of outages for customers reduced by 20% in Auki by June 2018 compared with June 20142
  • CO2 emissions reduced by 1623 tCO2e by January 2018 relative to June 2014 baseline
  • Diesel imports into Malaita Province for power generation reduced by 672,000 liters by June 2018 relative to June 2014 baseline
  • GWh hydropower generated from the Fiu River hydropower plant per annum by June 2019 (2014 baseline:0.0 GWh)
  • 500 school children benefit from studying at night-time by commissioning at end of 2015.
  • 50 rural households receive electricity from hydro-grid after commissioning in 2015
  • Wind data for design available by end of 2015 compared to non-existent data now.

95-3 GEO-Lab and Petroleum Information Centre

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS - Objectives 1: Improved physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure that all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and markets
Improved contribution of the mineral sector to the national employment statistics from1166 in 2011to over 2000 by 2020 and improved mineral shares in Commodity Export from 16% in 2011 to over 25% by 2020.
Outcome

Upgrading specialised equipment to modern technology facilities

Improved building capacity for laboratory technician staff
  • Lab equipment should be function and operated by the end 2018
  • Complete Training program to USP or other institution by 2018.
Outputs
  • Complete renovation of two Chemicals storage room and electrical wiring appliance for laboratory
  • Procurements of wet preparation Laboratory, Petrology & Thin Section specialized Equipment s
  • Complete procurement of remaining components and annual servicing of AAS
  • Laboratory Staff technician training.
  • Procurement of Chemicals/Reagents
  • Installation and Training of Petrology equipment completed
  • Procured of Thin Sections and training completed.
  • Chemicals and safety equipment/materials procured.
  • Chemical Storage room fully refurbished by end of 2016
  • Almost equipped with specialized equipment and chemicals by 2017
  • Proper handling or removal of chemicals disposal by end of 2014 completed
  • Chemicals and safety equipment in used by 2017
  • Improved facilities and working environment of the Geochemical, Petrology & Thin Section laboratory by 2016
  • Access to transport for Environmental sampling and monitoring by first quarter 2016
  • Completed by first and second quarter of 2018

95-4 SI Water Sector Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1, MTS 3, and Objective 2, MTS 5: Develop Physical Infrastructure and Utilities to Ensure all Solomon Islanders have Access to Essential Services and Markets
1. Solomon Islanders enjoying access to clean water supplies and sanitation services increased from 65% and 18% in 2010 to 78% and 23% respectively in 2015
  • health of Solomon Islanders is improved through reduction in water borne diseases
  • incidence of diarrhoea among children aged less than five years old diseased from 9.4% in 2007 to a lower value in 2018
Outcome

Urban and rural communities receive improved levels of water supply and sewerage services in terms of quality, quantity, coverage, reliability, and resilience.
  • coverage of water supply and sewerage in urban areas increased from about 40% to over 50% by 2015 and in rural areas from 65% to over 80% by 2018
  • water quality samples meeting WHO increased from less than 50% in 2011 to 97% in 2018
  • non-revenue water reduced from 55% to 30% by 2018
  • residents receiving water increased from current baseline of 14.2% to 21.5% in 2018
  • vulnerability to adverse impacts of climate change, including variability, reduced at local, provincial and national levels.
Outputs/Components



1. Urban Water Supply Development



1.1 Strengthening SIWA Systems and Capacity (JICA/SIG)





1.2 SI Urban Water Supply & Sewage Improvement (AusAID supported)





2. Increased Resilience of Water Supplies

2.1 SI Water Sector Adaptation (SIWSAP) (GEF/UNDP supported)











2.2 Resilient Community Water Supply Services (SIG funds)
  • At least 10 pilot sites identified by end 2014 with proposals to reduce non-revenue water
  • SIWA capacity to identify and implement non-revenue water reduction measures in place by 2015
  • Remedial works for the identified activities commenced in 2014 and completed by 2016
  • Two Year urban water supply Development Plan 2013 to 2015 implemented by mid-2015 to improve:
  • levels of services, customer care and communications
  • organisational capacity, financial management and administration.
  • Five Year Plan 2015-2020 for urban water and sewerage prepared by mid-2015.
  • Water Sector Climate Change Adaptation plans formulated, integrated and mainstreamed in appropriate policy and development frameworks by 2017
  • community level “soft” measures implemented at 6 pilot sites by 2017 to improve water supply and sanitation at times of scarcity including but not limited to:
  • diversify of sources;
  • protect and restore eco-systems;
  • demand management and efficiency;
  • traditional knowledge;
  • climate warning and preparedness for water resources.
  • strategic investments in water and sanitation completed by 2017 in target areas, including but not limited to:
  • enhanced water storage;
  • at least 1 small, climate resilient reservoirs;
  • up to 4 portable water filtration and desalination units;
  • better sanitation practices in small islands to protect the freshwater lens.
  • improved governance and knowledge for climate-resilient integrated water management developed and implemented at local and national levels by end 2017.
  • Establishment and promotion of best practices based on the above plans and pilots.
  • replication and implementation of best practices of the SIWSAP piloted soft and hard measures for resilient water resources management in new and existing systems in identified communities not included in the pilot projects starting in 2014;
  • investment in drilling service equipment and facilities to restore capacity for ground water resources development.

95-5 Gold Ridge Tailing Dam

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 4: Effectively Respond to Climate Change and Manage the Environment and Risks of Natural Disasters
4. Minimal damage to properties and no loss of lives during a natural disaster such as tropical cyclone

5. Lead time of warnings is improved 24 to 48 hours for tropical cyclones; Less than 10minutes for earthquake/tsunami events

6. 95 to 100% of warnings are accessed by the public.

7. 100% of weather and climate information accessed by stakeholders for planning purposes.
Outcome
  • Downstream communities are safe from any possible disaster.
  • The freshwater ecosystem and terrestrial ecosystem are protected.
8. Warnings are accessed by 95 to 99% of Solomon Islanders.

9. Lead time and accuracy is improved
Outputs

1…Relevant Scientific analysis regarding Environmental, Biological Chemical, Water and Sediment quality Assessments

2. Disaster Risk Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment.
10. A Mini Water Treatment Plant to treat supernatant water before discharge into Tinahulu River to reduce the water level by third/fourth quarter

95-6 Honiara Fuel Storage Relocation

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 4: Effectively Respond to Climate Change and Manage the Environment and Risks of Natural Disasters
A realistic plan to do Safe relocation of fuel terminals out of Honiara town.

Review of the petroleum storage & Handling Act 1979.
Outcome

Relocation of fuel terminals out of Honiara town.



Review of Petroleum storage and Handling Act.
Fuel storage Terminal relocated to a location outside of town



The “Petroleum storage and handling Act” gives clear guidelines for modern high standard of operation for the fuel industry.
Outputs
  • Feasibility study for relocation of storage terminals
  • Stakeholders review meetings of Act. 3.Actual relocation of the storage terminals.
  • Amendments to the petroleum storage and handling Act
Completed feasibility study report



Final draft of Amended Petroleum storage & Handling Act.

95-7 Mineral Sector Institutional Strengthening Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1: Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefits
Increase GDP Growth which now stands at 3.2%
Outcome

Promote sustainable use of mineral resources to increase production, value added, and rural incomes
Develop New National Mineral Policy within 1 year of completion as of year 2016 for sustainable development of viable mineral deposits including New Mines and Minerals Act, Regulations and Guidelines within 4 years of completion which will begin in year 2016
Outputs
  • National Mineral Policy, Mining Act, Regulation and Guidelines to provide overarching governance, regulatory system and guide for mineral development
  • New Mining Projects will establish
  • Two storey building
  • New mineral policy, New Mining act, regulation and guidelines within 4 years of completion which will begin in year 2016
  • Increase revenue collection to Solomon Islands Government and increase employment with creation of Mines working offices in Provinces hosting mining projects as of year 2016 and onwards for 25 years.
  • One two storey building for geochem (rock/soil) storage on ground floor and Mines Division office on upper floor within 1 year of completion by end of year 2018

95-8 Petroleum Sector Institutional Strengthening Project

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
ImpactComposite Country Performance Ratings increased from 10.5 in 2011 to at least 13 in 2020
Outcome

Adopt an effective regulatory and monitoring system inclusive of the Extended Continental Shelf taking into account standards and experiences
  • New instructions and regulations are developed
  • New Structure is implemented
  • Improved operational capacity of the Petroleum Division
  • Petroleum licenses granted
  • Increase number of Petroleum Prospectors in SI
Outputs
  • Support the development and implementation of new rules for the Petroleum regulatory and legal framework taking into account standards and experiences
  • Support for Technical and Administrative Capacity of the Petroleum Division
  • Specification for specific software system to be acquired developed
  • Concept model of the petroleum data to be stored and managed is developed
  • Document management and archiving system is developed

96 National Judiciary

96-1 NJ Institutional Infrastructure Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

To Improve Governance and Order at National, Provincial and Community Levels and Strengthen Links between Them
Composite Country Performance Ratings increased from 10.5 in 2011 to at least 13 in 2020
Outcome

Capacity of the Courts, legal staff, and systems are better able to deliver accessible, efficient and effective justice services to the Government and people of the Solomon Islands
Improved efficiency results in reduction in pre-trial detainees/remand prisoners from 41% in 2011 to less than 30% by 2018
Outputs
  • Housing provided for NJ officers.
  • Central Magistrates Complex.
  • National courthouses in good, usable condition.
  • Construction of 10 houses completed and occupied by end 2018.
  • Central Magistrates Complex built and being used by magistrates by end 2018
  • Well designed and costed detailed plan completed by end 2015.
  • All existing courthouses and offices rehabilitated and secure by end 2018.
  • New courthouses constructed at Gizo, Lata by end 2018

97 Ministry of Women, Youth and Children Affairs

97-1 National Centers for Women, Youth and Children

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Increase Economic Growth & Equitably distribute employment and income benefits
GDP per Capita (2005 PPP$) to increase from $2,430 in 2010 by an average exceeding 3.5% per year. Average rating for Policies for Social Inclusion and Equity increased from 2.9% in 2011 to at least 3.3% before 2020
Outcome

Improving the livelihood of all Solomon Islanders
At least 70% of rural Solomon Islanders have access to social services by 2017 20% improvement in supportive infrastructure
Outputs
  • Small Businesses Established and Operating
  • Local/Rural Economies developed
  • Employement Created/Income Generated
  • Small infrastructures developed
  • At least 70% of rural micro businesses are supported both with technical inputs and materials by 2020
  • Rural/local businesses establishment increased by 2% annually up to 2020
  • An annual increase of 2% in rural employment in the 50 constituencies up to 2020
  • More than 50% of population experienced improvement in physical infrastructure by 2020

98 Ministry of Rural Development

98-1 Constituency Development Program

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Increase Economic Growth & Equitably distribute employment and income benefits Strategic Objective: Addressing the basic needs of all the people.

Beneficiaries of the Project: Solomon Islanders in all 50 Constituencies
GDP per Capita (2005 PPP$) to increase from $1,600 in 2013 by an average exceeding 0.5% per year.

Equity increased from 2.9% in 2011 to at least 3.3% before 2020
Outcome
  • Improving the livelihood of all Solomon Islanders
  • At least 70% of the 80% of rural Solomon Islanders population have access to improved social services by 2020
  • 20% improvement in supportive infrastructure by 2020
Outputs

Small Businesses Established and Operating



Local/Rural Economies developed



Employment Created/Income Generated



Small infrastructures support socio-economic livelihoods constructed
  • At least 70% of rural micro businesses are supported both with technical inputs and materials by 2020
  • Rural/local businesses establishment increased by 5% annually up to 2020
  • An annual increase of 2% in rural employment in the 50 constituencies up to year 2020
  • More than 70% of rural population have access to improved housing 2020
  • 75% increase in facilities supporting processing constructed by 2020

98-2 MRD-Database and Management System

98-3 Rural Development Centres

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS Objective 1 – Increase Economic Growth and Equitably Distribute Employment and Income Benefits Strategic Objective: Provide enabling environment to stimulate economic growth in rural areas of Solomon Islands

Beneficiaries of the Project:

Solomon Islanders in all 50 Constituencies
  • Reduce urban drift by 2% in 2016
  • Employment in Rural formal economy increase by 1.5% by 2016
  • Access to improved basic rural social services delivery in 2016
  • Site developments take place in 7 Development Centres by Dec 2016
Outcome

Increase participation of the rural populace in the socio-economic development

3. Improvement to socio-economic infrastructure supporting rural economies

4. Increase investment in rural economy
  • Improve access to business, marketing facilities and employment opportunities
  • Infrastructure and services established in 7 development centers
  • More investment businesses established within the Development Centre vicinity
Outputs
  • Development Centre sites identified and surveyed
  • Land payments made & MOU signed
  • Infrastructures and facilities constructed
  • 7sites surveyed and developed in 2016
  • Land issues addressed in 7 sites in 2016
  • Constituency offices and residential buildings built in 7 constituencies
  • Processing facilities operational & utilized

99 Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology

99-1 Low Carbon Emission Development Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 4: Effectively Respond to Climate
Outcome

Enhanced national climate change programme linking the development of low carbon emission framework towards climate change mitigation and improved capacity that contributes to increased resilience and achievement of sustainable development goals
An overarching framework bringing all relevant sectors to take climate change mitigation actions is developed
Outputs

1. Policy on regulatory framework to facilitate transition to green growth, low carbon climate resilient paths and increased access to clean energy and low emission mitigation projects developed.
  • By 2017 a regulatory framework policy for green growth is established.
  • By 2014 onward capacities within various sectors dealing with CC mitigation built

99-2 Environment Conservation Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 4: Effectively Respond to Climate Change and Manage the Environment and Risks of Natural Disasters
Outcome

Improve mechanisms for waste management and disposal system.
1) Major developers adhere to waste management requirements in the Environment Act 1998 by treating wastes to acceptable standards.

2) Wastes are Reduced, Reused and Recycled by the communities.

3) Major prescribed developments under the Environment Act 1998
Outputs

1) Environmental safeguards enforced through the application of the EIA Process and regular monitoring and evaluation conducted

2)Waste minimised and Landfill developed.

3) Environmental pollution controlled
1) Waste reduced to 60% at household level before reaching The landfill.

2) By 2015 all solid wastes are disposed at a control manner in a proper designed landfill.

99-3 National Climate Change and Disaster Risk Resilience Programme (continuation of SICAP)

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 4: Effectively Respond to Climate Change and Manage the Environment and Risks of Natural Disasters

Strategic Objective:

events including a timely warnings
5. Minimal damage to properties and no loss of lives during a natural disaster such as tropical cyclone
Outcome

National Vulnerability and risks due to adverse impacts of climate change documented and adaptation measures implemented.
By 2021, all provinces within Solomon Islands and their selected communities will be able to register climate change adaptation projects for implementation
Outputs
  • Provincial Institutional structures in participating provinces are strengthened and climate change mainstreamed into participating provincial policies and programmes.
By 2019, most of the provinces would have established policies and structural adjustments that would create conducive environment to better address climate issues and enhance sustainable development.

By 2017, a policy guideline on resettlement is made available

99-4 MECDM office building: Environment Haus

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

To build and upgrade physical infrastructure and utilities to ensure that all Solomon Islanders have access to essential services and to markets
By 2025, public access to and knowledge of MECDM services (meteorological services, disaster risk management, climate adaptation/mitigation, environmental management and biodiversity conservation, and national focal point responsibilities for relevant international conventions) are improved.
Outcome

Improved capacity to support integration of national environmental issues in a holistic way so as to adapt to impacts of climate change and variability, improved disaster preparedness and risk resilience, halt deterioration of the eco-systems, restore damaged ecosystems and ensure their survival in the long term to benefit Solomon Islanders.
1. By 2025, 80% of the Solomon Islands’ population can be to access and effectively respond to warning systems (EWS).

  • By 2025, all provinces in the Solomon Islands have legal registered protected areas.
  • By 2025, all provinces in the Solomon Islands have established local institutions and capacity to support climate adaptation activities.
Outputs

A new and adequately furnished MECDM office building that provides conducive and professional working environment for the MECDM staff and its clients and partners.
2. By the end of 2017, a new MECDM office building has been completed, furnished and operational.

99-5 NDMO Infrastructure Strengthening Programme

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

NDS OBJECTIVE 4 - Effectively Respond to Climate Change and Manage the Environment and Risks of Natural Disasters.
By 2018, Improved capacity in the Solomon Islands to effectively respond to and manage disaster risks and coordinate disaster emergency responses and rehabilitation.
Outcome

National and Provincial Government able to manage risk and impacts of disasters
3. Emergency Operation Centres established in all provinces by 2018.

4. Staff Housing constructed in all Provinces by 2018

5. National Emergency Operation Center upgraded by end of 2014.
Outputs
  • Provincial Emergency Operation Centre constructed in the Provinces
  • Provincial NDMO Staff houses are constructed in 8 provinces
  • The National Emergency Operation Centre is upgraded.
6. Renbel PEOC completed by 2017.

7. Isabel, Guadalcanal, Honiara City EOC to be completed by end of Dec 2017.

8. Choiseul Province PEOC to be completed by Dec 20117

9. Malaita Province PEOC Extension to be completed by end of 2018 Provincial staff housing for Provincial Disaster Officers built in 8 provinces and Honiara City Council by 2018.

10. Guadalcanal and Isabel Province – Dec 2017.

11. Honiara City and Central Province - Dec 2017

12. Western and Choiseul Province – Dec 2018

13. Malaita and Temotu Province - Dec 2017

14. New NEOC Building completed by June 2017

15. Backup Generator procured and installed by April 2014.

16. NDMO warehouse refurbished by Dec 2017

99-6 SIMS Early warning Systems

Design SummaryPerformance Targets and Indicators
Impact

Objective 4: Effectively Respond to Climate Change and Manage the Environment and Risks of Natural Disasters Strategic Objective:

Improve Solomon Islands Meteorological Service capability and capacity to forecast severe weather events, including tropical cyclones.

Beneficiaries

People of Solomon Islands will be better informed about severe weather events including a timely warnings
17. Minimal damage to properties and no loss of lives during a natural disaster such as tropical cyclone

18. Lead time of warnings is improved 24 to 48 hours for tropical cyclones; Less than 10minutes for earthquake/tsunami events

19. 95 to 100% of warnings are accessed by the public.

20. 100% of weather and climate information accessed by stakeholders for planning purposes.
Outcome

Early warning capability enhanced through better infrastructures
21. Warnings are accessed by 95 to 99% of Solomon Islanders.

22. Lead time and accuracy is improved
Outputs
  • Expand and sustain adequate observations sites with the required quantity and quality for all meteorological services (including climate) including automatic weather stations.
  • Establish a multi-hazard early warning system that is workable for all hazards.
  • Upgrade all communication infrastructures
23. At least 90 % of the project is completed by 2020
1

National Development Strategy – 2016 to 2035. A draft, endorsed by Cabinet, was issued in August 2015 for consultation with stakeholders and will shortly be finalized.

1

Approved Budget figures, as shown in Budget Ledger 4. Figure 19 provides actual 2014 expenditure.

2

Baseline will be determined by design and supervision consultants

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